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The Diamond Age
The Diamond Age: Or, A Young Lady's Illustrated Primer is a science fiction novel by American writer Neal Stephenson. It is to some extent a bildungsroman or coming-of-age story, focused on a young girl named Nell, set in a future world in which nanotechnology affects all aspects of life. The novel deals with themes of education, social class, ethnicity, and the nature of artificial intelligence. The Diamond Age was first published in 1995 by Bantam Books, as a Bantam Spectra hardcover edition
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Protagonist
A protagonist (from Ancient Greek πρωταγωνιστής (protagonistes), meaning 'player of the first part, (chief actor)' is the main character in any story, such as a literary work or drama.[1][2] The protagonist is at the center of the story, makes the key decisions, and experiences the consequences of those decisions. The protagonist affects the main characters' circumstances as well, as they are often the primary actor propelling the story forward. If a story contains a subplot, or is a narrative made up of several stories, then the character who is interpreted as the protagonist of each subplot or individual story.[3] The word protagonist is used notably in stories and forms of literature and culture that contain stories, which would include dramas, novels, operas and films
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Electronic Paper
Electronic paper
Electronic paper
and e-paper are display devices that mimic the appearance of ordinary ink on paper.[1] Unlike conventional backlit flat panel displays that emit light, electronic paper displays reflect light like paper. This may make them more comfortable to read, and provide a wider viewing angle than most light-emitting displays. The contrast ratio in electronic displays available as of 2008 approaches newspaper, and newly (2008) developed displays are slightly better.[2] An ideal e-paper display can be read in direct sunlight without the image appearing to fade. Many electronic paper technologies hold static text and images indefinitely without electricity
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Miniseries
A miniseries (or mini-series, also known as a serial in the UK) is a television program that tells a story in a predetermined, limited number of episodes.Contents1 History 2 Great Britain 3 North America 4 Japan 5 South Korea 6 Soviet Union/Russia 7 Brazil 8 See also 9 ReferencesHistory[edit] A miniseries is distinguished from an ongoing television series; the latter do not usually have a predetermined number of episodes and may continue for several years. Before the term was coined in the USA in the early 1970s, the ongoing episodic form was always called a "serial", just as a novel appearing in episodes in successive editions of magazines or newspapers is called a serial. In Britain, miniseries are often still referred to as serials. Several commentators have offered more precise definitions of the term
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Syfy
Syfy
Syfy
(formerly Sci-Fi Channel and Sci Fi) is an American basic cable and satellite television channel that is owned by the NBCUniversal Cable Entertainment Group division of NBCUniversal, a subsidiary of Comcast.[1] The channel features science fiction, fantasy, horror, supernatural, paranormal, drama, and reality programming.[2] Syfy
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Bruce Jensen
Bruce Jensen (born 1962 in Indianapolis, Indiana) is a US illustrator who has created book covers for science fiction authors such as Kim Stanley Robinson, Neal Stephenson, Charles Sheffield, Joe Haldeman, Linda Nagata, Kelley Eskridge, and Philip K. Dick. His covers were described by Nagata as "deftly illustrat[ing] the mood, the feeling of the book".[1] He also drew the unfinished Neuromancer graphic novel in 1989. He won the 1995 Jack Gaughan Award for Best Emerging Artist. Career overview[edit] Bruce Jensen began drawing at an early age, drawing the typical childhood birds and dinosaurs. As he grew older he discovered science fiction. A book that heavily influenced his decision to become a science fiction cover artist was Jack Gaughn's cover to The Skylark of Valeron by E. E. Smith. When Bruce was in high school he realized his dream to become an artist
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Engines Of Creation
Engines of Creation: The Coming Era of Nanotechnology is a 1986 molecular nanotechnology book written by K. Eric Drexler
K. Eric Drexler
with a foreword by Marvin Minsky. An updated version was released in 2007. The book has been translated into Japanese, French, Spanish, Italian, Russian, and Chinese.[1]Contents1 Synopsis 2 Nanosystems (1992) 3 Engines of Creation
Engines of Creation
2.0 (2007) 4 Reception 5 References 6 External linksSynopsis[edit] The book features nanotechnology, which Richard Feynman
Richard Feynman
had discussed in his 1959 speech There's Plenty of Room at the Bottom
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Richard Feynman
Richard Phillips Feynman (/ˈfaɪnmən/; May 11, 1918 – February 15, 1988) was an American theoretical physicist known for his work in the path integral formulation of quantum mechanics, the theory of quantum electrodynamics, and the physics of the superfluidity of supercooled liquid helium, as well as in particle physics for which he proposed the parton model. For his contributions to the development of quantum electrodynamics, Feynman, jointly with Julian Schwinger
Julian Schwinger
and Shin'ichirō Tomonaga, received the Nobel Prize in Physics
Nobel Prize in Physics
in 1965. Feynman developed a widely used pictorial representation scheme for the mathematical expressions governing the behavior of subatomic particles, which later became known as Feynman diagrams. During his lifetime, Feynman became one of the best-known scientists in the world
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Han Chinese
The Han Chinese, Han people[27][28][29] or simply Han[28][29][30] (/hɑːn/;[31] Mandarin: [xân]; Han characters: 漢人 (Mandarin pinyin: Hànrén; literally "Han people"[32]) or 漢族 (pinyin: Hànzú; literally "Han ethnicity"[33] or "Han ethnic group"[34])) are an East Asian ethnic group and nation.[35] They constitute the world's largest ethnic group, making up about 18% of the global population. The estimated 1.3 billion Han Chinese
Han Chinese
are mostly concentrated in Mainland China, where they make up about 92% of the total population.[2] The
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Legal Aid
Legal aid is the provision of assistance to people otherwise unable to afford legal representation and access to the court system. Legal aid is regarded as central in providing access to justice by ensuring equality before the law, the right to counsel and the right to a fair trial. This article describes the development of legal aid and its principles, primarily as known in Europe, the Commonwealth of Nations and the United States. A number of delivery models for legal aid have emerged, including duty lawyers, community legal clinics and the payment of lawyers to deal with cases for individuals who are entitled to legal aid. Legal aid is essential to guaranteeing equal access to justice for all, as provided for by Article 6.3 of the European Convention on Human Rights regarding criminal law cases
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Aerostat
An aerostat (From Greek ἀήρ aer (air) + στατός statos (standing) through French) is a lighter than air aircraft that gains its lift through the use of a buoyant gas. Aerostats include unpowered balloons and powered airships. A balloon may be free-flying or tethered. The average density of the craft is lower than the density of atmospheric air, because its main component is one or more gasbags, a lightweight skin containing a lifting gas to provide buoyancy, to which other components such as a gondola containing equipment or people are attached.[1][2] Especially with airships, the gasbags are often protected by an outer envelope. Aerostats are so named because they use aerostatic lift which is a buoyant force that does not require movement through the surrounding air mass. This contrasts with the heavy aerodynes that primarily use aerodynamic lift which requires the movement of a wing surface through the surrounding air mass
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Locus Award
The Locus Awards are an annual set of literary awards by the science fiction and fantasy magazine Locus, a monthly based in Oakland, California, United States. The award winners are selected by polling magazine readers. The awards are presented at an annual banquet. The publishers of winning works are honored with certificates, which is unique in the field.[1] The awards were inaugurated in 1971 for publication year 1970 and the original purpose was to influence the Hugo Awards.[1]Contents1 Winners 2 Categories 3 Inactive categories 4 References 5 External linksWinners[edit] The following have won the most awards as of July 2011[update]:[2]Gardner Dozois* (35) Michael Whelan** (28) Ursula K. Le Guin
Ursula K. Le Guin
(21) Harlan Ellison
Harlan Ellison
(18) Neil Gaiman
Neil Gaiman
(18) Ellen Datlow* (12) Dan Simmons (12) Terry Carr* (11) George R. R. Martin
George R. R

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International Monetary Fund
The International Monetary Fund
International Monetary Fund
(IMF) is an international organization headquartered in Washington, D.C., of "189 countries working to foster global monetary cooperation, secure financial stability, facilitate international trade, promote high employment and sustainable economic growth, and reduce poverty around the world."[1] Formed in 1945 at the Bretton Woods Conference
Bretton Woods Conference
primarily by the ideas of Harry Dexter White and John Maynard Keynes,[5] it came into formal existence in 1945 with 29 member countries and the goal of reconstructing the international payment system. It now plays a central role in the management of balance of payments difficulties and international financial crises.[6] Countries contribute funds to a pool through a quota system from which countries experiencing balance of payments problems can borrow money
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Molecules
A molecule is an electrically neutral group of two or more atoms held together by chemical bonds.[4][5][6][7][8] Molecules are distinguished from ions by their lack of electrical charge. However, in quantum physics, organic chemistry, and biochemistry, the term molecule is often used less strictly, also being applied to polyatomic ions. In the kinetic theory of gases, the term molecule is often used for any gaseous particle regardless of its composition. According to this definition, noble gas atoms are considered molecules as they are monoatomic molecules.[9] A molecule may be homonuclear, that is, it consists of atoms of one chemical element, as with oxygen (O2); or it may be heteronuclear, a chemical compound composed of more than one element, as with water (H2O)
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Phyle
Phyle (Greek φυλή phulē, "clan, race, people"; pl. phylai, φυλαί; derived from ancient Greek φύεσθαι "to descend, to originate") is an ancient Greek term for clan or tribe. They were usually ruled by a basileus. Some of them can be classified by their geographic location: the Geleontes, the Argadeis, the Hopletes, and the Agikoreis, in Ionia ; the Hylleans, the Pamphyles, the Dymanes, in the Dorian region.Contents1 Attic tribes 2 The ten tribes of Thurii 3 Footnotes 4 ReferencesAttic tribes[edit] The best-attested new system was that created by Cleisthenes
Cleisthenes
for Attica
Attica
in or just after 508 BC. The landscape was regarded as comprising three zones: urban, coastal and inland
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Values
In ethics, value denotes the degree of importance of some thing or action, with the aim of determining what actions are best to do or what way is best to live (normative ethics), or to describe the significance of different actions. It may be described as treating actions as abstract objects, putting value to them. It deals with right conduct and living a good life, in the sense that a highly, or at least relatively high valuable action may be regarded as ethically "good" (adjective sense), and that an action of low value, or relatively low in value, may be regarded as "bad".[citation needed] What makes an action valuable may in turn depend on the ethic values of the objects it increases, decreases or alters. An object with "ethic value" may be termed an "ethic or philosophic good" (noun sense). Values can be defined as broad preferences concerning appropriate courses of actions or outcomes. As such, values reflect a person's sense of right and wrong or what "ought" to be
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