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The Chronicle Of Higher Education
The Chronicle of Higher Education
The Chronicle of Higher Education
is a newspaper and website that presents news, information, and jobs for college and university faculty and Student Affairs
Student Affairs
professionals (staff members and administrators). A subscription is required to read some articles.[5] The Chronicle, based in Washington, D.C., is a major news service in United States academic affairs. It is published every weekday online and appears weekly in print except for every other week in June, July, and August and the last three weeks in December (a total of 42 issues a year)
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Newspaper
A newspaper is a periodical publication containing written information about current events. Newspapers
Newspapers
can cover wide variety of fields such as politics, business, sport and art and often include materials such as opinion columns, weather forecasts, reviews of local services, obituaries, birth notices, crosswords, editorial cartoons, comic strips, and advice columns. Most newspapers are businesses, and they pay their expenses with a mixture of subscription revenue, newsstand sales, and advertising revenue. The journalism organizations that publish newspapers are themselves often metonymically called newspapers. Newspapers
Newspapers
have traditionally been published in print (usually on cheap, low-grade paper called newsprint)
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The New Republic
The New Republic
The New Republic
is a liberal American magazine of commentary on politics and the arts, published since 1914, with influence on American political and cultural thinking. Founded in 1914 by leaders of the progressive movement, it attempted to find a balance between a humanitarian progressivism and an intellectual scientism, ultimately discarding the latter. Through the 1980s and '90s it incorporated elements of conservatism.[2] In 2014, two years after Chris Hughes purchased the magazine, he ousted its editor and attempted to remake its format and operations, provoking the resignation of the majority of its editors and writers
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For-profit Corporation
A for-profit corporation is an organization which aims to earn profit through its operations and is concerned with its own interests, unlike those of the public (non-profit corporation).[1]Contents1 Structure 2 Aims 3 Popular models3.1 B-corporations 3.2 Proximity to LLCs4 Advantages4.1 To the economy 4.2 To the business5 Difference between profit and not-for-profit 6 Legal parameters 7 ReferencesStructure[edit] A for-profit corporation is usually an organization operating in the private sector which sets aims that eventually help the organization itself. This kind of a company makes shares of ownership available to the general public. The purchasers of those shares then become the company's shareholders; shareholders have bought a portion of ownership of the corporation by giving away certain amount of money (differentiating from company to company) or assets of a particular value
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Education Week
Education Week is an award-winning independent news organization that has covered K–12 education since 1981. It is known for providing both news and analysis, along with explanatory and investigative journalism across a range of digital, print, and broadcast platforms as well as through live and virtual events. It is owned by Editorial Projects in Education (EPE), a nonprofit organization, whose mission is to raise awareness and understanding of critical issues facing American schools. It is headquartered in Bethesda, Maryland
Bethesda, Maryland
in Greater Washington DC. The newspaper publishes 37 issues a year, including three special annual reports (Quality Counts, Technology Counts, and Leaders to Learn From)
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Gopher (protocol)
The Gopher
Gopher
protocol /ˈɡoʊfər/ is a TCP/IP application layer protocol designed for distributing, searching, and retrieving documents over the Internet. The Gopher
Gopher
protocol was strongly oriented towards a menu-document design and presented an alternative to the World Wide Web
World Wide Web
in its early stages, but ultimately Hypertext
Hypertext
Transfer Protocol (HTTP) became the dominant protocol. The Gopher
Gopher
ecosystem is often regarded as the effective predecessor of the World Wide Web.[1] The protocol was invented by a team led by Mark P. McCahill[2] at the University of Minnesota. It offers some features not natively supported by the Web and imposes a much stronger hierarchy on information stored on it
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IPad
iPad (/ˈaɪpæd/ EYE-pad) is a line of tablet computers designed, developed and marketed by Apple Inc., which run the iOS mobile operating system. The first iPad was released on April 3, 2010; the most recent iPad models are the iPad (2018), released on March 27, 2018, the 10.5-inch (270 mm) and 12.9-inch (330 mm) 2G iPad Pro released on June 13, 2017. The user interface is built around the device's multi-touch screen, including a virtual keyboard. All iPads can connect via Wi-Fi; some models also have cellular connectivity. As of January 2015, Apple had sold more than 250 million iPads[6], though sales peaked in 2013[17][18] and it is now the second-most popular kind of tablet computer, by sales, after Android-based types.[19] An iPad can shoot video, take photos, play music, and perform Internet functions such as web-browsing and emailing
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Diploma Mill
A diploma mill (also known as a degree mill) is a company or organization that claims to be a higher education institution but provides illegitimate academic degrees and diplomas for a fee.[1][2] These degrees may claim to give credit for relevant life experience, but should not be confused with legitimate prior learning assessment programs. They may also claim to evaluate work history or require submission of a thesis or dissertation for evaluation to give an appearance of authenticity.[3] Diploma
Diploma
mills are frequently supported by accreditation mills, set up for the purpose of providing an appearance of authenticity.[4] The term may also be used pejoratively to describe an accredited institution with low academic admission standards and a low job placement rate
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Plagiarism
Plagiarism
Plagiarism
is the "wrongful appropriation" and "stealing and publication" of another author's "language, thoughts, ideas, or expressions" and the representation of them as one's own original work.[1][2] Plagiarism
Plagiarism
is considered academic dishonesty and a breach of journalistic ethics. It is subject to sanctions like penalties, suspension, and even expulsion. Recently, cases of "extreme plagiarism" have been identified in academia.[3] The modern concept of plagiarism as immoral and originality as an ideal emerged in Europe in the 18th century, particularly with the Romantic movement. Plagiarism
Plagiarism
is not in itself a crime, but can constitute copyright infringement
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National Magazine Award
The National Magazine
Magazine
Awards, also known as the Ellie Awards, honor print and digital publications that consistently demonstrate superior execution of editorial objectives, innovative techniques, noteworthy enterprise and imaginative design. Originally limited to print magazines, the awards now recognize magazine-quality journalism published in any medium. They are sponsored by the American Society of Magazine
Magazine
Editors in association with Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism and are administered by ASME in New York City, New York. The awards have been presented annually since 1966.[1] The Ellie Awards are judged by magazine journalists and journalism educators selected by the administrators of the awards. More than 300 judges participate every year. Each judge is assigned to a judging group that averages 15 judges, including a judging leader
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Utne Reader
Utne Reader
Utne Reader
(a.k.a. Utne)[pronunciation?] is a quarterly American magazine that collects and reprints articles on politics, culture, and the environment, generally from alternative media sources including journals, newsletters, weeklies, zines, music, and DVDs. The magazine's writers and editors contribute book, film, and music reviews and original articles which tend to focus on emerging cultural trends. The magazine's website produces ten blogs covering politics, environment, media, spirituality, science and technology, great writing, and the arts
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The Nation
The Nation
The Nation
is the oldest continuously published weekly magazine in the United States, and the most widely read weekly journal of progressive political and cultural news, opinion, and analysis
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Ford Foundation
The Ford Foundation
Ford Foundation
is a New York-headquartered, globally oriented private foundation with the mission of advancing human welfare.[2][3][4][5] Created in 1936[6] by Edsel Ford
Edsel Ford
and Henry Ford, it was originally funded by a US$25,000 gift from Edsel Ford.[3] By 1947, after the death of the two founders, the foundation owned 90% of the non-voting shares of the Ford Motor Company. (The Ford family retained the voting shares.)[7] Between 1955 and 1974, the foundation sold its Ford Motor Company
Ford Motor Company
holdings and now plays no role in the automobile company
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Reason (magazine)
Reason is an American libertarian
American libertarian
monthly magazine published by the Reason Foundation.[1] The magazine has a circulation of around 50,000[2] and was named one of the 50 best magazines in 2003 and 2004 by the Chicago Tribune.[3][4]Contents1 History1.1 Funding and partners1.1.1 Controversy2 Hit & Run 3 Reason TV 4 See also 5 References 6 External linksHistory[edit] Reason was founded in 1968 by Lanny Friedlander (1947–2011)[2][5] as a more-or-less monthly mimeographed publication. In 1970 it was purchased by Robert W. Poole, Jr., Manuel S
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The American Prospect
The American Prospect is a daily online and quarterly print American political and public policy magazine dedicated to American liberalism and progressivism. Based in Washington, D.C., The American Prospect says it aims "to advance liberal and progressive goals through reporting, analysis, and debate about today's realities and tomorrow's possibilities."[3]Contents1 History 2 Format 3 Contributors 4 References 5 External linksHistory[edit] The magazine was founded in 1990 (and initially called The Liberal Prospect) by Robert Kuttner, Robert Reich, and Paul Starr
Paul Starr
as a response to the perceived ascendancy of conservatism in the 1980s. Robert Kuttner
Robert Kuttner
and Paul Starr
Paul Starr
currently serve as Co-Editors. Harold Meyerson serves as Executive Editor
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Alliance For Audited Media
The Alliance for Audited Media (AAM) is a North American non-profit industry organization founded in 1914 by the Association of National Advertisers to help ensure media transparency and trust among advertisers and media companies. Originally known as the Audit Bureau of Circulations (ABC), today AAM is a source of verified media information and technology platform certifications, providing standards, audit services and data for the advertising and publishing industries. It is one of more than three dozen such organizations operating worldwide, affiliated with the International Federation of Audit Bureaux of Circulations (IFABC). AAM independently verifies print and digital circulation, mobile apps, website analytics, social media, technology platforms and audience information for newspapers, magazines and digital media companies in the U.S. and Canada
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