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The Bridge On The River Kwai
The Bridge on the River Kwai
The Bridge on the River Kwai
is a 1957 British-American epic war film directed by David Lean
David Lean
and based on the novel Le Pont de la Rivière Kwai (1952) by Pierre Boulle. The film is a work of fiction that uses the historical setting of the construction of the Burma Railway
Burma Railway
in 1942–1943. The cast included William Holden, Jack Hawkins, and Alec Guinness and Sessue Hayakawa. It was initially scripted by screenwriter Carl Foreman, who was later replaced by Michael Wilson. Both writers had to work in secret, as they were on the Hollywood blacklist
Hollywood blacklist
and had fled to England in order to continue working
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Howard Hawks
Howard Winchester Hawks (May 30, 1896 – December 26, 1977) was an American film director, producer and screenwriter of the classic Hollywood
Hollywood
era. Critic Leonard Maltin
Leonard Maltin
called him "the greatest American director who is not a household name."[1] Hawks was a versatile director whose career included comedies, dramas, gangster films, science fiction, film noir, and westerns.[2] His most popular films include Scarface (1932), Bringing Up Baby
Bringing Up Baby
(1938), Only Angels Have Wings (1939), His Girl Friday
His Girl Friday
(1940), To Have and Have Not (1944), The Big Sleep (1946), Red River (1948), The Thing from Another World (1951), and Rio Bravo (1959)
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Russo-Japanese War
1,200,000 (total)[1]650,000 (peak)1,365,000 (total)[1]700,000 (peak)Casualties and losses47,152–47,400 killed 11,424–11,500 died of wounds 21,802–27,200 died of diseaseTotal: 58,000–86,100[2][3]34,000–52,623 killed or died of wounds 9,300–18,830 died of disease 146,032 wounded 74,369 capturedTotal: 43,300–120,000[2][3]v t eRusso-Japanese WarNaval battles1st Port Arthur Chemulpo Bay Hitachi Maru convoy Yellow Sea Ulsan Korsakov TsushimaLand battlesYalu River Nanshan Te-li-Ssu Motien Pass Tashihchiao 2nd Port Arthur Hsimucheng Liaoyang Shaho Sandepu Mukden Sakhalinv t eJapanese colonial campaignsMeiji period Korea
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Library Of Congress
The Library of Congress
Library of Congress
(LOC) is the research library that officially serves the United States
United States
Congress and is the de facto national library of the United States. It is the oldest federal cultural institution in the United States. The Library is housed in three buildings on Capitol Hill in Washington, D.C.; it also maintains the Packard Campus in Culpeper, Virginia, which houses the National Audio-Visual Conservation Center.[3] The Library of Congress
Library of Congress
claims to be the largest library in the world.[4][5] Its "collections are universal, not limited by subject, format, or national boundary, and include research materials from all parts of the world and in more than 450 languages
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American Film Institute
The American Film Institute
American Film Institute
(AFI) is an American film
American film
organization that educates filmmakers and honors the heritage of the motion picture arts in the United States. AFI is supported by private funding and public membership.Contents1 Leadership 2 History 3 List of programs in brief 4 AFI Conservatory4.1 Notable alumni5 AFI programs5.1 AFI Catalog of Feature Films 5.2 AFI Life Achievement Award 5.3 AFI Awards 5.4 AFI Maya Deren Award 5.5 AFI 100 Years... series 5.6 AFI film festivals5.6.1 AFI Fest 5.6.2 AFI Docs5.7 AFI Silver
AFI Silver
Theatre and Cultural Center 5.8 The AFI Directing Workshop for Women6 AFI Directors Series 7 In popular culture 8 2017 Sexual harassment allegations 9 See also 10 References 11 External linksLeadership[edit] The institute is composed of leaders from the film, entertainment, business and academic communities
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Empire Of Japan
The Empire of Japan
Japan
(大日本帝國, Dai Nippon Teikoku, literally meaning "Great Japanese Empire")[9] was the historical nation-state[nb 2] and great power that existed from the Meiji Restoration
Meiji Restoration
in 1868 to the enactment of the 1947 constitution of modern Japan.[1] Japan's rapid industrialization and militarization under the slogan Fukoku Kyōhei (富國強兵, "Enrich the Country, Strengthen the Armed Forces") led to its emergence as a world power and the establishment of a colonial empire
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Geneva Convention (1929)
The Geneva
Geneva
Convention (1929) was signed at Geneva, July 27, 1929. Its official name is the Convention relative to the Treatment of Prisoners of War, Geneva
Geneva
July 27, 1929. It entered into force 19 June 1931.[1] It is this version of the Geneva Conventions
Geneva Conventions
which covered the treatment of prisoners of war during World War II. It is the predecessor of the Third Geneva Convention
Third Geneva Convention
signed in 1949. On their web site, the International Committee of the Red Cross
International Committee of the Red Cross
states that:Provisions concerning the treatment of prisoners of war are contained in the Hague Regulations of 1899 and 1907. In the course of World War I they revealed several deficiencies as well as a lack of precision. Such defects were partly overcome by special agreements made between belligerents in Berne in 1917 and 1918
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Seppuku
Seppuku
Seppuku
(切腹, "cutting [the] belly"), sometimes referred to as harakiri (腹切り, "abdomen/belly cutting", a native Japanese kun reading), is a form of Japanese ritual suicide by disembowelment. It was originally reserved for samurai, but was also practiced by other Japanese people later on to restore honor for themselves or for their family. A samurai practice, seppuku was used either voluntarily by samurai to die with honor rather than fall into the hands of their enemies (and likely suffer torture) or as a form of capital punishment for samurai who had committed serious offenses, or performed because they had brought shame to themselves
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British Army
The British Army
Army
is the principal land warfare force of the United Kingdom, a part of British Armed Forces. As of 2017, the British Army comprises just over 80,000 trained regular (full-time) personnel and just over 26,500 trained reserve (part-time) personnel.[4] Since April 2013, Ministry of Defence publications have not reported the entire strength of the Regular Reserve; instead, only Regular Reserves serving under the fixed-term reserve contracts have been counted.[5] The modern British Army
Army
traces back to 1707, with an antecedent in the English Army
Army
that was created during the Restoration in 1660
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Hollywood Blacklist
The Hollywood blacklist
Hollywood blacklist
- as the broader entertainment industry blacklist is generally known - was the practice of denying employment to screenwriters, actors, directors, musicians, and other American entertainment professionals during the mid-20th century because they were accused of having Communist
Communist
ties or sympathies. Artists were barred from work on the basis of their membership, alleged membership in, or sympathy with the Communist
Communist
Party USA, or their refusal to assist investigations into the party's activities
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Mortar (weapon)
A mortar is an indirect fire device that launches projectiles at ranges from 70 meters to 14,000 meters. The mortar has traditionally been used as a weapon to propel explosive shells called mortar rounds in high-arcing ballistic trajectories. The weapon is typically muzzle-loading with a short, often smooth-bore barrel, generally less than 15 times its caliber. Modern mortars are light and easily portable. They can be used for close fire support with a variety of ammunition.Contents1 History1.1 Origins 1.2 Modern portable mortar 1.3 Largest mortars 1.4 Improvised mortars2 Function 3 Design3.1 Distinctive features of mortars 3.2 Spigot mortar 3.3 Gun-mortars4 Images 5 See also 6 References 7 External linksHistory[edit] Origins[edit] Mortars have been used for hundreds of years, originally in siege warfare. Many historians consider the first mortars to have been used at the 1453 siege of Constantinople by Mehmed the Conqueror
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Credit (creative Arts)
In general, the term credit in the artistic or intellectual sense refers to an acknowledgement of those who contributed to a work, whether through ideas or in a more direct sense.Contents1 Credit in the arts1.1 Non-fiction 1.2 In fiction2 In computing 3 See alsoCredit in the arts[edit] In the creative arts, credits are an acknowledgement of those who participated in the production. They are often shown at the end of movies and on CD jackets. In film, video, television, theater, etc., credits means the list of actors and behind-the-scenes staff who contributed to the production. See also: Motion picture credits Non-fiction[edit] In non-fiction writing, especially academic works, it is generally considered important to give credit to sources of information and ideas. Failure to do so often gives rise to charges of plagiarism, and "piracy" of intellectual rights such as the right to receive a royalty for having written
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Academy Of Motion Picture Arts And Sciences
The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences
Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences
(AMPAS, also known as simply the Academy) is a professional honorary organization with the stated goal of advancing the arts and sciences of motion pictures
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Sri Lanka
Coordinates: 7°N 81°E / 7°N 81°E / 7; 81Democratic Socialist Republic
Republic
of Sri Lanka ශ්‍රී ලංකා ප්‍රජාතාන්ත්‍රික සමාජවාදී ජනරජය (Sinhalese) Srī Lankā prajātāntrika samājavādī janarajaya இலங்கை ஜனநாயக சோசலிச குடியரசு (Tamil) Ilaṅkai jaṉanāyaka sōsalisa kuṭiyarasuFlagEmblemAnthem: "Sri Lanka
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John Ford
John Ford
John Ford
(February 1, 1894 – August 31, 1973) was an American film director. He is renowned both for Westerns such as Stagecoach (1939), The Searchers
The Searchers
(1956), and The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance
The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance
(1962), as well as adaptations of classic 20th-century American novels such as the film The Grapes of Wrath
The Grapes of Wrath
(1940). His four Academy Awards
Academy Awards
for Best Director (in 1935, 1940, 1941, and 1952) remain a record
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