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The Boston Globe
The Boston
Boston
Globe (sometimes abbreviated as The Globe) is an American daily newspaper founded and based in Boston, Massachusetts, since its creation by Charles H. Taylor in 1872. The newspaper has won a total of 26 Pulitzer Prizes as of 2016, and with a total paid circulation of 245,824 from September 2015 to August 2016,[3] it is the 25th most read newspaper in the United States. The Boston
Boston
Globe is the oldest and largest daily newspaper in Boston.[4] Founded in the later 19th century, the paper was mainly controlled by Irish Catholic
Irish Catholic
interests before being sold to Charles H. Taylor and his family. After being privately held until 1973, it was sold to The New York Times in 1993 for $1.1 billion, making it one of the most expensive print purchases in U.S
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Daily Newspaper
A newspaper is a periodical publication containing written information about current events. Newspapers
Newspapers
can cover wide variety of fields such as politics, business, sport and art and often include materials such as opinion columns, weather forecasts, reviews of local services, obituaries, birth notices, crosswords, editorial cartoons, comic strips, and advice columns. Most newspapers are businesses, and they pay their expenses with a mixture of subscription revenue, newsstand sales, and advertising revenue. The journalism organizations that publish newspapers are themselves often metonymically called newspapers. Newspapers
Newspapers
have traditionally been published in print (usually on cheap, low-grade paper called newsprint)
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Investigative Journalism
Investigative journalism
Investigative journalism
is a form of journalism in which reporters deeply investigate a single topic of interest, such as serious crimes, political corruption, or corporate wrongdoing. An investigative journalist may spend months or years researching and preparing a report. Investigative journalism
Investigative journalism
is a primary source of information. Most investigative journalism is conducted by newspapers, wire services, and freelance journalists
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Springfield, Massachusetts
Springfield is a city in western New England, and the seat of Hampden County, Massachusetts, United States.[15] Springfield sits on the eastern bank of the Connecticut River
Connecticut River
near its confluence with three rivers: the western Westfield River, the eastern Chicopee River, and the eastern Mill River. As of the 2010 Census, the city's population was 153,060.[9] Metropolitan Springfield, as one of two metropolitan areas in Massachusetts
Massachusetts
(the other being Greater Boston), had a population of 692,942 as of 2010.[11] The first Springfield in the New World, it is the largest city in western New England, and the urban, economic, and cultural capital of Massachusetts' Connecticut River
Connecticut River
Valley (colloquially known as the Pioneer Valley)
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WGGB-TV
WGGB-TV is an ABC-affiliated television station licensed to Springfield, Massachusetts, United States, serving the Pioneer Valley of Western Massachusetts. It broadcasts a high definition digital signal on virtual and UHF channel 40 from a transmitter on Mount Tom in Holyoke. The station is owned by Meredith Corporation (as such, it is the only ABC affiliate owned by the company) and is sister to low-powered CBS affiliate WSHM-LD (channel 3.5). The two stations share studios on Liberty Street in Springfield.Contents1 History 2 WGGB-DT2 3 Digital television3.1 Digital channels 3.2 Analog-to-digital conversion4 Programming 5 News operation 6 See also 7 References 8 External linksHistory[edit] The station signed on April 14, 1953 as WHYN-TV, broadcasting an analog signal on UHF channel 55.[1] It was the second television station to launch in the Springfield market, debuting one month after NBC affiliate WWLP (channel 22)
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Blog
A blog (a truncation of the expression "weblog")[1] is a discussion or informational website published on the World Wide Web
World Wide Web
consisting of discrete, often informal diary-style text entries ("posts"). Posts are typically displayed in reverse chronological order, so that the most recent post appears first, at the top of the web page. Until 2009, blogs were usually the work of a single individual,[citation needed] occasionally of a small group, and often covered a single subject or topic. In the 2010s, "multi-author blogs" (MABs) have developed, with posts written by large numbers of authors and sometimes professionally edited. MABs from newspapers, other media outlets, universities, think tanks, advocacy groups, and similar institutions account for an increasing quantity of blog traffic. The rise of Twitter
Twitter
and other "microblogging" systems helps integrate MABs and single-author blogs into the news media
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Columbia Journalism Review
The Columbia Journalism
Journalism
Review (CJR) is an American magazine for professional journalists that has been published by the Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism
Journalism
since 1961. Its contents include news and media industry trends, analysis, professional ethics, and stories behind news. In October 2015, it was announced that the publishing frequency of the print magazine was being reduced from six to two issues per year in order to focus on digital operations.[2]Contents1 Organization board 2 Finances 3 Editor 4 See also 5 References 6 External linksOrganization board[edit] The current chairman is Stephen J
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Baseball Hall Of Fame
The National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum
Museum
is an American history museum and hall of fame, located in Cooperstown, New York, and operated by private interests. It serves as the central point for the study of the history of baseball in the United States
United States
and beyond, displays baseball-related artifacts and exhibits, and honors those who have excelled in playing, managing, and serving the sport. The Hall's motto is "Preserving History, Honoring Excellence, Connecting Generations." The word Cooperstown is often used as shorthand (or a metonym) for the National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. The Hall of Fame was established in 1939 by Stephen Carlton Clark, the owner of a local hotel. Clark had sought to bring tourists to a city hurt by the Great Depression, which reduced the local tourist trade, and Prohibition, which devastated the local hops industry
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J. G. Taylor Spink Award
The J. G. Taylor Spink Award is the highest award given by the Baseball Writers' Association of America
Baseball Writers' Association of America
(BBWAA). The award was instituted in 1962 and named after J. G. Taylor Spink, publisher of The Sporting News from 1914 to 1962, who was also the first recipient. The recipient does not have to be a member of the BBWAA, but every recipient from the award's inception through 2013 had been a BBWAA member at some time; the first recipient to have never have been a member was 2014 recipient Roger Angell.[1] The Spink Award is presented at the induction festivities of the Baseball Hall of Fame in the year following the selection of the recipient
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Academy Award For Best Picture
The Academy Award for Best Picture is one of the Academy Awards presented annually since the awards debuted in 1929, by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences (AMPAS)
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Emmy Award
An Emmy Award, or simply Emmy, is an American award that recognizes excellence in the television industry, and is the equivalent of an Academy Award (for film), the Tony Award
Tony Award
(for theatre), and the Grammy Award (for music).[1] Because Emmys are given in various sectors of the American television industry, they are presented in different annual ceremonies held throughout the year. The two events that receive the most media coverage are the Primetime Emmy Awards and the Daytime Emmy Awards, which recognize outstanding work in American primetime and daytime entertainment programming, respectively. Other notable Emmy Award ceremonies are those honoring national sports programming, national news and documentary shows, national business and financial reporting, and technological and engineering achievements in television, including the Primetime Engineering Emmy Awards
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World Wide Web
The World Wide Web
World Wide Web
(abbreviated WWW or the Web) is an information space where documents and other web resources are identified by Uniform Resource Locators (URLs), interlinked by hypertext links, and can be accessed via the Internet.[1] English scientist Tim Berners-Lee invented the World Wide Web
World Wide Web
in 1989
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United States Dollar
 United States  East Timor[2][Note 1]  Ecuador[3][Note 2]  El Salvador[4]  Federated States of Micronesia  Marshall Islands  Palau  Panama[Note 3]  Zimbabwe[Note 4]3 non-U.S
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Irish Americans
Irish Americans
Americans
(Irish: Gael-Mheiriceánaigh) are an ethnic group comprising Americans
Americans
who have full or partial ancestry from Ireland, especially those who identify with that ancestry, along with their cultural characteristics. About 33 million Americans—10.5% of the total population—reported Irish ancestry in the 2013 American Community Survey conducted by the U.S. Census Bureau.[1] This compares with a population of 6.4 million on the island of Ireland
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Boston Advertiser
The Boston
Boston
Daily Advertiser (est. 1813) was the first daily newspaper in Boston, and for many years the only daily paper in Boston.[2]Contents1 History 2 Contributors 3 Allusions in literature 4 Images 5 See also 6 References 7 Bibliography 8 External linksHistory[edit]Daily Advertiser building, Boston, c. 1870sThe Advertiser was established in 1813, and in March 1814 it was purchased by journalist Nathan Hale. Hale was its chief editor until his death in 1863. Under Hale's supervision, the paper was first Federalist in politics, then Whig, and finally Republican, and it became very influential. It opposed the Missouri Compromise
Missouri Compromise
of 1820 and the Kansas-Nebraska Act
Kansas-Nebraska Act
in 1854, and was the first paper to recommend the free colonization of Kansas
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Editor-in-chief
An editor-in-chief, also known as lead editor, chief editor, managing or executive editor, is a publication's editorial leader who has final responsibility for its operations and policies.[1][2]Contents1 Description 2 References 3 Further reading 4 External linksDescription[edit] The editor-in-chief heads all departments of the organization and is held accountable for delegating tasks to staff members and managing them. The term is often used at newspapers, magazines, yearbooks, and television news programs. The editor-in-chief is commonly the link between the publisher or proprietor and the editorial stafplied to academic journals, where the editor-in-chief gives the ultimate decision whether a submitted manuscript will be published
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