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The Book Of Bond
The Book of Bond
The Book of Bond
or, Every Man His Own 007 is a book by Kingsley Amis which was first published by Jonathan Cape
Jonathan Cape
in 1965. For this work, Amis used the pseudonym Lt.-Col. William ("Bill") Tanner. In Ian Fleming's James Bond
James Bond
novels, Bill Tanner
Bill Tanner
is M's chief of staff and a recurring character throughout the series. A tongue-in-cheek work, published by the same company that issued the Bond novels, The Book of Bond
The Book of Bond
is a manual for prospective agents on how to live like Agent 007, illustrated with examples taken from the Fleming canon. The first edition of this book was published with a false slipcover printed with the title The Bible to be Read as Literature
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Jonathan Cape
Jonathan Cape
Jonathan Cape
is a London
London
publishing firm founded in 1921 by Herbert Jonathan Cape, who was head of the firm until his death in 1960. Cape and his business partner Wren Howard set up the publishing house in 1921. They established a reputation for high quality design and production and a fine list of English-language authors, fostered by the firm's editor and reader Edward Garnett. Cape's list of writers ranged from poets including Robert Frost
Robert Frost
and C. Day Lewis, to children's authors such as Hugh Lofting
Hugh Lofting
and Arthur Ransome, to James Bond novels by Ian Fleming, to heavyweight fiction by James Joyce
James Joyce
and T. E. Lawrence. After Cape's death, the firm later merged successively with three other London
London
publishing houses. In 1987 it was taken over by Random House
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Hardback
A hardcover or hardback (also known as hardbound, and sometimes as case-bound) book is one bound with rigid protective covers (typically of cardboard covered with buckram or other cloth, heavy paper, or occasionally leather). It has a flexible, sewn spine which allows the book to lie flat on a surface when opened. Following the ISBN
ISBN
sequence numbers, books of this type may be identified by the abbreviation Hbk.Detail of "Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea", first English edition (1873), showing cloth pattern on cover Hardcover
Hardcover
books are often printed on acid-free paper, and they are much more durable than paperbacks, which have flexible, easily damaged paper covers. Hardcover
Hardcover
books are marginally more costly to manufacture
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Paperback
A paperback is a type of book characterized by a thick paper or paperboard cover, and often held together with glue rather than stitches or staples. In contrast, hardcover or hardback books are bound with cardboard covered with cloth. The pages on the inside are made of paper. Inexpensive books bound in paper have existed since at least the 19th century in such forms as pamphlets, yellowbacks, dime novels, and airport novels.[1] Modern paperbacks can be differentiated by size. In the U.S., there are "mass-market paperbacks" and larger, more durable "trade paperbacks." In the U.K., there are A-format, B-format, and the largest C-format sizes.[2] Paperback
Paperback
editions of books are issued when a publisher decides to release a book in a low-cost format. Cheaper, lower quality paper; glued (rather than stapled or sewn) bindings; and the lack of a hard cover may contribute to the lower cost of paperbacks
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Comedy
In a modern sense, comedy (from the Greek: κωμῳδία, kōmōidía) refers to any discourse or work generally intended to be humorous or amusing by inducing laughter, especially in theatre, television, film, stand-up comedy, or any other medium of entertainment. The origins of the term are found in Ancient Greece. In the Athenian democracy, the public opinion of voters was influenced by the political satire performed by the comic poets at the theaters.[1] The theatrical genre of Greek comedy can be described as a dramatic performance which pits two groups or societies against each other in an amusing agon or conflict. Northrop Frye
Northrop Frye
depicted these two opposing sides as a "Society of Youth" and a "Society of the Old".[2] A revised view characterizes the essential agon of comedy as a struggle between a relatively powerless youth and the societal conventions that pose obstacles to his hopes
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M (James Bond)
M is a fictional character in Ian Fleming's James Bond
James Bond
book and film series; the characterized is the Head of the Secret Intelligence Service—also known as MI6—and is Bond's superior. Fleming based the character on a number of people he knew who commanded sections of British intelligence
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Canon (fiction)
In fiction, canon is the material accepted as officially part of the story in the fictional universe of that story. It is often contrasted with, or used as the basis for, works of fan fiction. The alternative terms mythology, timeline, universe and continuity are often used, with the former being especially used to refer to a richly detailed fictional canon requiring a large degree of suspension of disbelief (e.g. an entire imaginary world and history), while the latter two typically refer to a single arc where all events are directly connected chronologically
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Jake's Thing
Jake's Thing is a satirical novel written by Kingsley Amis, first published in 1978 by Hutchinson. The novel follows the life of Jacques 'Jake' Richardson, a 59-year-old Oxford don who struggles to overcome the loss of his libido.This article about a 1970s novel is a stub. You can help by expanding it.v t eSee guidelines for writing about novels
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James Bond (literary Character)
Commander James Bond, CMG, RNVR, is a fictional character created by the British journalist and novelist Ian Fleming
Ian Fleming
in 1953. He is the protagonist of the James Bond
James Bond
series of novels, films, comics and video games. Fleming wrote twelve Bond novels and two short story collections. His final two books—The Man with the Golden Gun (1965) and Octopussy and The Living Daylights
Octopussy and The Living Daylights
(1966)—were published posthumously. The Bond character is a Secret Service agent, code number 007, residing in London but active internationally
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The Man With The Golden Gun (novel)
The Man with the Golden Gun is the twelfth novel (and thirteenth book) of Ian Fleming's James Bond series. It was first published by Jonathan Cape in the UK on 1 April 1965, eight months after the author's death. The novel was not as detailed or polished as the others in the series, leading to poor but polite reviews. Despite that, the book was a best-seller. The story centres on the fictional British Secret Service operative James Bond, who had been posted missing, presumed dead, after his last mission in Japan
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Live And Let Die (novel)
Live and Let Die is the second novel in Ian Fleming's James Bond series of stories, and is set in London, the US and Jamaica. It was first published in the UK by Jonathan Cape on 5 April 1954. Fleming wrote the novel at his Goldeneye estate in Jamaica before his first book, Casino Royale, was published; much of the background came from Fleming's travel in the US and knowledge of Jamaica. The story centres on Bond's pursuit of "Mr Big", a criminal who has links to the American criminal network, the world of voodoo and SMERSH—an arm of the Russian secret service—all of which are threats to the West. Bond becomes involved in the US through Mr Big's smuggling of 17th-century gold coins from British territories in the Caribbean
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Martin Amis
Martin Louis Amis (born 25 August 1949) is a British novelist, essayist and memoirist. His best-known novels are Money (1984) and London Fields (1989). He has received the James Tait Black Memorial Prize for his memoir Experience and has been listed for the Booker Prize twice to date (shortlisted in 1991 for Time's Arrow and longlisted in 2003 for Yellow Dog)
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Isabel Fonseca
Isabel Fonseca (born 1961, New York City) is an American-Uruguayan writer. She is best known for her books Bury Me Standing: The Gypsies and Their Journey and Attachment. She is married to novelist Martin Amis.Contents1 Early life 2 Career 3 Marriage to Martin Amis 4 Notable works 5 References 6 External linksEarly life[edit] Isabel Fonseca was born in New York in 1961 and is the youngest of four children born to Uruguayan sculptor Gonzalo Fonseca and American painter Elizabeth Fonseca
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John Amis
John Preston Amis (17 June 1922 – 1 August 2013) was a British broadcaster, classical music critic, music administrator, and writer. He was a frequent contributor for The Guardian
The Guardian
and to BBC
BBC
radio and television music programming. Born in Dulwich, London
London
to a banking family, and a cousin of the novelist Kingsley Amis, Amis was educated at Dulwich
Dulwich
College, where he began a lifelong friendship with his contemporary, Donald Swann. A serious bout of mastoiditis as a child left him deaf in his left ear. He began his career working in a bank for five and a half weeks before leaving to earn a living in music
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Lemmons
Lemmons, also known as Gladsmuir and Gladsmuir House, was the home of novelists Kingsley Amis
Kingsley Amis
(1922–1995) and Elizabeth Jane Howard (1923–2014) on the south side of Hadley Common, Barnet, on the border of north London and Hertfordshire.[2] The couple bought the Georgian five-bay villa (built around 1830)[a] for £48,000 at auction in 1968, along with its eight acres of land, and lived there until 1976. The house had been registered as a Grade II listed building in 1949 under the name Gladsmuir, previously known as Gladsmuir House.[4] Jane Howard restored an earlier name, Lemmons; the next owners changed it back to Gladsmuir.[5] Jane and Kingsley lived at Lemmons
Lemmons
with Jane's mother and brother, two artist friends, and Kingsley's three children, including the novelist Martin Amis
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List Of James Bond Novels And Short Stories
The James Bond
James Bond
literary franchise is a series of novels and short stories, first published in 1953 by Ian Fleming, a British author, journalist, and former naval intelligence officer. James Bond, often referred to by his code name, 007, is a British Secret Service agent; the character was created by journalist and author Ian Fleming, and first appeared in his 1953 novel Casino Royale; the books are set in a contemporary period, between May 1951 and February 1964. Fleming went on to write a total of twelve novels and two collections of short stories, all written at his Jamaican home Goldeneye and published annually. Two of his books were published after his death in 1964. Since Fleming's death a number of other authors have written continuation works. Some of these have been novelizations of episodes in the series of Bond films, produced by Eon Productions, while others were either continuation novels or short stories
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