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Thayendanegea
Thayendanegea or Joseph Brant
Joseph Brant
(March 1743 – November 24, 1807) was a Mohawk military and political leader, based in present-day New York, who was closely associated with Great Britain during and after the American Revolution. Perhaps the Native American of his generation best known to the Americans and British, he met many of the most significant Anglo-American people of the age, including both George Washington and King George III. While not born into a hereditary leadership role within the Iroquois League, Brant rose to prominence due to his education, abilities and his connections to British officials. His sister, Molly Brant, was the consort of Sir William Johnson, the influential British Superintendent of Indian Affairs in the province of New York. During the American Revolutionary War, Brant led Mohawk and colonial Loyalists known as "Brant's Volunteers" against the rebels in a bitter partisan war on the New York frontier
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Joseph A. Brandt
Joseph A. Brandt was the sixth president of the University of Oklahoma. Brandt received his college degree from the University of Oklahoma, making him the first alumnus to become president of the University of Oklahoma. Following his degree at Oklahoma, he went to Oxford as a Rhodes Scholar
Rhodes Scholar
and received three degrees there. He returned to Oklahoma to become the city editor of the Tulsa Tribune. In 1928, he took a job as head of the University of Oklahoma
University of Oklahoma
Press where he remained until 1938 when he accepted a similar position at the Princeton University Press. In 1941, after turning down three previous offers for better paying positions, he returned to Oklahoma as the president of the University, a position he held for only two years. He left in 1943 after the Oklahoma state government cut the University's already low budget further
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Battle Of Carillon
The Battle of Carillon, also known as the 1758 Battle of Ticonderoga,[5] was fought on July 8, 1758, during the French and Indian War (which was part of the global Seven Years' War)
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Mohawk River
The Mohawk River
River
is a 149-mile-long (240 km)[4] river in the U.S. state of New York
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Electoral Palatinate
The County Palatine of the Rhine
Rhine
(German: Pfalzgrafschaft bei Rhein), later the Electorate of the Palatinate
Electorate of the Palatinate
(German: Kurfürstentum von der Pfalz) or simply Electoral Palatinate[1] (German: Kurpfalz), was a territory in the Holy Roman Empire
Holy Roman Empire
(specifically, a palatinate) administered by the Count Palatine
Count Palatine
of the Rhine
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German Palatines
The German Palatines
German Palatines
were early 18th century emigrants from the Middle Rhine
Rhine
region of the Holy Roman Empire, including a minority from the Palatinate which gave its name to the entire group. Towards the end of the 17th century and into the 18th, the wealthy region was repeatedly invaded by French troops, which resulted in continuous military requisitions, widespread devastation and famine. The "Poor Palatines" were some 13,000 Germans
Germans
who migrated to England between May and November 1709. Their arrival in England, and the inability of the British Government to integrate them, caused a highly politicized debate over the merits of immigration
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Old Fort Johnson
Old Fort Johnson, or Fort Johnson, was a two-story stone house enclosed in fortifications built by Sir William Johnson
Sir William Johnson
about 1749 in the town of Amsterdam, Montgomery County, New York, United States. The fort served as Johnson's home, business office and trading center until 1763 when he moved to Johnson Hall
Johnson Hall
in what is now Johnstown, New York.[3] Sir William's son Sir John Johnson
Sir John Johnson
owned the house from 1763 until 1776, when it was confiscated by the local Committee of Safety. The house is now located directly across from the Fort Johnson Volunteer Fire Company in Fort Johnson, New York. The house remains and is owned and operated as a museum by the Montgomery County Historical Society. It was designated a National Historic Landmark in 1972.[2][4][5] Footnotes[edit]^ National Park Service
National Park Service
(2007-01-23)
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Four Mohawk Kings
The Four Indian Kings or Four Kings of the New World were three Mohawk chiefs from one of the Five Nations of the Iroquois Confederacy
Iroquois Confederacy
and a Mahican
Mahican
of the Algonquian peoples, whose portraits were painted by Jan Verelst in London
London
to commemorate their travel from New York in 1710 to meet the Queen of Great Britain
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Great Britain In The Seven Years War
Great Britain
Great Britain
was one of the major participants in the Seven Years' War which lasted between 1754 and 1763. Britain emerged from the war as the world's leading colonial power, having gained a number of new territories at the Treaty of Paris in 1763 and established itself as the world's pre-eminent naval power. The war started poorly for Britain, which suffered many deaths from the plague and scurvy, and at the hands of France in North America during 1754–55; and in the loss of Menorca
Menorca
in 1756. The same year Britain's major ally Austria switched sides and aligned itself with France; and Britain was hastily forced to conclude a new alliance with Frederick the Great's Prussia. For the next seven years these two nations were ranged against a growing number of enemy powers led by France
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French And Indian War
British victoryTreaty of ParisTerritorial changes France cedes New France
New France
east of the Mississippi River
Mississippi River
to Great Britain, retaining Saint Pierre and Mi
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Canada (New France)
Canada
Canada
was a French colony within New France
New France
first claimed in the name of the King of France in 1535 during the second voyage of Jacques Cartier.[1][2][3][4] The word "Canada" at this point referred to the territory along the Saint Lawrence River,[5] then known as the Canada river, from Grosse Island in the east to a point between Quebec
Quebec
and Three Rivers,[6] although this territory had greatly expanded by 1600. French explorations continued "unto the Countreys of Canada, Hochelaga, and Saguenay"[7] before any permanent settlements were established
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James Abercrombie (general)
War of the Austrian Succession Seven Years' WarFrench and Indian WarBattle of Fort Ticonderoga General
General
James Abercrombie or Abercromby (1706 – 23 April 1781)[1][2] was a British Army
British Army
general and commander-in-chief of forces in North America during the French and Indian War, best known for the disastrous British losses in the 1758 Battle of Carillon.Contents1 Biography 2 Family 3 See also 4 References 5 External linksBiography[edit] Abercrombie was born in Glassaugh, Banffshire, Scotland
Scotland
[3] to a wealthy family, and was appointed an ensign in the 25th Regiment of Foot at age eleven. He was promoted to captain in 1736, and purchased a major's commission in 1742
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Lake George (New York)
Lake George, nicknamed the Queen of American Lakes,[2] is a long, narrow oligotrophic lake located at the southeast base of the Adirondack Mountains, in the northeastern portion of the U.S. state
U.S. state
of New York. It lies within the upper region of the Great Appalachian Valley and drains all the way northward into Lake Champlain
Lake Champlain
and the St. Lawrence River
St. Lawrence River
drainage basin. The lake is situated along the historical natural (Amerindian) path between the valleys of the Hudson and St. Lawrence
St. Lawrence
Rivers, and so lies on the direct land route between Albany, New York
Albany, New York
and Montreal, Quebec, Canada. The lake extends about 32.2 mi (51.8 km) on a north-south axis, is quite deep, and varies from one to three miles (1.6 to 4.8 km) in width, presenting a significant barrier to east-west travel
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Battle Of Fort Niagara
The Battle of Fort Niagara
Fort Niagara
was a siege late in the French and Indian War, the North American theatre of the Seven Years' War
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Mary Brant
Molly Brant
Molly Brant
(c. 1736 – April 16, 1796, Mohawk), also known as Mary Brant, Konwatsi'tsiaienni, and Degonwadonti, was influential in New York and Canada in the era of the American Revolution. Living in the Province of New York, she was the consort of Sir William Johnson, the British Superintendent of Indian Affairs, with whom she had eight children. Joseph Brant, who became a Mohawk leader and war chief, was her younger brother. After Johnson's death in 1774, Brant and her children left Johnson Hall in Johnstown, New York
Johnstown, New York
and returned to her native village of Canajoharie, further west on the Mohawk River. A Loyalist during the American Revolutionary War, she migrated to British Canada, where she served as an intermediary between British officials and the Iroquois.[1] After the war, she settled in what is now Kingston, Ontario
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Jeffery Amherst
Field Marshal Jeffery[n 1] Amherst, 1st Baron Amherst, KB (29 January 1717 – 3 August 1797) served as an officer in the British Army
British Army
and as Commander-in-Chief of the Forces. Amherst is best known as the architect of Britain's successful campaign to conquer the territory of New France during the Seven Years' War. Under his command, British forces captured the cities of Louisbourg, Quebec City and Montreal, as well as several major fortresses. He was also the first British Governor General
General
in the territories that eventually became Canada. Numerous places and streets are named for him, in both Canada and the United States. Amherst is also known for his attitude to the indigenous peoples in Canada, leading to his armies attempting to exterminate the "execrable races" with blankets infected with smallpox[1] and this had led to a reconsideration of his legacy
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