HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Thai Chinese
9,349,900 (est) 14 percent of the Thai population (2012)[1] up to 26,000,000 Thais of at least partial Chinese descent (around 40 percent of the Thai population) (2012)[2]Regions with significant populations Thailand Bangkok, Phuket, Chiang Mai, Hat Yai, SongkhlaLanguagesThai, Southern Thai historically Southern Min
Southern Min
(Teochew and Hokkien), Hainanese, Hakka and CantoneseReligionPredominantly
[...More...]

"Thai Chinese" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Chin Haw
Chin Haw
Chin Haw
or Chin Ho (Thai: จีนฮ่อ) are Chinese people who migrated to Thailand
Thailand
via Burma
Burma
or Laos. Most of them were originally from Yunnan, the southern province of China.[1][2] They speak Southwestern Mandarin.Contents1 Migration 2 Religion 3 Activities 4 See also 5 ReferencesMigration[edit] Generally, the Chin Haw
Chin Haw
can be divided into three groups according to the time of their migration.[3]In nineteenth century, the Qing army had sent troops to suppress the rebellion in Yunnan, known as the Panthay
Panthay
Rebellion, which caused up to 1,000,000 lives lost - both civilians and soldiers
[...More...]

"Chin Haw" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Han Chinese
The Han Chinese, Han people[27][28][29] or simply Han[28][29][30] (/hɑːn/;[31] Mandarin: [xân]; Han characters: 漢人 (Mandarin pinyin: Hànrén; literally "Han people"[32]) or 漢族 (pinyin: Hànzú; literally "Han ethnicity"[33] or "Han ethnic group"[34])) are an East Asian ethnic group and nation.[35] They constitute the world's largest ethnic group, making up about 18% of the global population. The estimated 1.3 billion Han Chinese
Han Chinese
are mostly concentrated in Mainland China, where they make up about 92% of the total population.[2] The
[...More...]

"Han Chinese" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Standard Chinese
Standard Chinese, also known as Modern Standard Mandarin, Standard Mandarin, or simply Mandarin, is a standard variety of Chinese that is the sole official language of both China
China
and Taiwan
Taiwan
(de facto), and also one of the four official languages of Singapore. Its pronunciation is based on the Beijing
Beijing
dialect, its vocabulary on the Mandarin dialects, and its grammar is based on written vernacular Chinese. Like other varieties of Chinese, Standard Chinese
Standard Chinese
is a tonal language with topic-prominent organization and subject–verb–object word order. It has more initial consonants but fewer vowels, final consonants and tones than southern varieties
[...More...]

"Standard Chinese" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Hanyu Pinyin
Hanyu Pinyin
Hanyu Pinyin
Romanization
Romanization
(simplified Chinese: 汉语拼音; traditional Chinese: 漢語拼音), often abbreviated to pinyin, is the official romanization system for Standard Chinese
Standard Chinese
in mainland China
China
and to some extent in Taiwan. It is often used to teach Standard Mandarin Chinese, which is normally written using Chinese characters. The system includes four diacritics denoting tones. Pinyin
Pinyin
without tone marks is used to spell Chinese names and words in languages written with the Latin alphabet, and also in certain computer input methods to enter Chinese characters. The pinyin system was developed in the 1950s by many linguists, including Zhou Youguang,[1] based on earlier form romanizations of Chinese
[...More...]

"Hanyu Pinyin" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Yale Romanization Of Cantonese
The Yale romanization of Cantonese
Cantonese
was developed by Gerard P. Kok for his and Parker Po-fei Huang's textbook Speak Cantonese
Cantonese
initially circulated in looseleaf form in 1952[1] but later published in 1958.[2] Unlike the Yale romanization of Mandarin, it is still widely used in books and dictionaries, especially for foreign learners of Cantonese. It shares some similarities with Hanyu Pinyin
Pinyin
in that unvoiced, unaspirated consonants are represented by letters traditionally used in English and most other European languages to represent voiced sounds. For example, [p] is represented as b in Yale, whereas its aspirated counterpart, [pʰ] is represented as p
[...More...]

"Yale Romanization Of Cantonese" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Guangdong
Guangdong
Guangdong
(Chinese: 广东) is a province in South China, located on the South China
South China
Sea coast. Traditionally romanised as Kwangtung, Guangdong
Guangdong
surpassed Henan
Henan
and Sichuan
Sichuan
to become the most populous province in China
China
in January 2005, registering 79.1 million permanent residents and 31 million migrants who lived in the province for at least six months of the year;[5][6] the total population was 104,303,132 in the 2010 census, accounting for 7.79 percent of Mainland China's population.[7] This also makes it the most populous first-level administrative subdivision of any country outside the former British Raj, as its population is surpassed only by those of the Pakistani province of Punjab[8] and the Indian states of Maharashtra
Maharashtra
and Uttar Pradesh[9]
[...More...]

"Guangdong" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Hakka People
The Hakkas (/ˈhækə/;[4][5] Chinese: 客家), sometimes Hakka Han,[1][6] are Han Chinese
Han Chinese
people whose ancestral homes are chiefly in the Hakka-speaking provincial areas of Guangdong, Fujian, Jiangxi, Guangxi, Sichuan, Hunan, Zhejiang, Hainan
Hainan
and Guizhou. The Chinese characters for Hakka (客家) literally mean "guest families".[7] Unlike other Han Chinese
Han Chinese
groups, the Hakkas are not named after a geographical region, e.g. a province, county or city
[...More...]

"Hakka People" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Hainanese People
The Hainan
Hainan
people (Chinese: 海南人), also known as Hainanese
Hainanese
or Hailam (in Hokkien
Hokkien
dialect, especially in Malaysia
Malaysia
and Indonesia), are a Han Chinese
Han Chinese
subgroup who originate from Hainan, the southernmost and smallest Chinese province. The term "Hainanese" was frequently used by Hainanese-speaking Han (Chinese: 海南漢人), who form the majority in the island, to identify themselves overseas
[...More...]

"Hainanese People" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Rama I
Phra Phutthayotfa Chulalok (Thai: พระพุทธยอดฟ้าจุฬาโลก), born Thongduang (Thai: ทองด้วง) and also known as Rama I
Rama I
(20 March 1737 – 7 September 1809), was the founder of Rattanakosin Kingdom and the first monarch of the reigning Chakri dynasty
Chakri dynasty
of Siam (now Thailand). His full title in Thai is Phra Bat Somdet Phra Paramoruracha Mahachakkriborommanat Phra Phutthayotfa Chulalok (Thai: พระบาทสมเด็จพระปรโมรุราชามหาจักรีบรมนารถ พระพุทธยอดฟ้าจุฬาโลก). He ascended the throne in 1782, after defeating a rebellion which had deposed King Taksin
Taksin
of Thonburi
[...More...]

"Rama I" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Thonburi Dynasty
Kingdom of Thonburi
Thonburi
(Thai: ธนบุรี) was a Siamese kingdom after the downfall of the Ayutthaya Kingdom
Ayutthaya Kingdom
by the Konbaung Burmese invader. The kingdom was founded by King Taksin
Taksin
the Great, who relocated the capital to Thonburi. The kingdom of Thonburi
Thonburi
existed from 1767
1767
to 1782. In 1782, King Rama I
King Rama I
founded the Rattanakosin Kingdom and relocated the capital to Bangkok
Bangkok
on the other side of the Chao Phraya
Chao Phraya
River, thus bringing the Thonburi
Thonburi
kingdom to an end
[...More...]

"Thonburi Dynasty" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

Dominant Minority
A dominant minority is a minority group that has overwhelming political, economic, or cultural dominance in a country, despite representing a small fraction of the overall population (a demographic minority). Dominant minorities are also known as alien elites if they are recent immigrants. The term is most commonly used to refer to an ethnic group which is defined along racial, national, religious, cultural or tribal lines and that holds a disproportionate amount of power. A notable example is South Africa
South Africa
during the apartheid regime, where White South Africans, or Afrikaners more specifically, wielded predominant control of the country, despite never composing more than 22% of the population
[...More...]

"Dominant Minority" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Fujian Province
Fujian
Fujian
(Chinese: 福建; pinyin: Fújiàn; pronounced [fǔtɕjɛ̂n] ( listen)), formerly romanised as Foken, Fouken, Fukien, and Hokkien, is a province on the southeast coast of mainland China. Fujian
Fujian
is bordered by three provinces: Zhejiang
Zhejiang
to the north, Jiangxi
Jiangxi
to the west and Guangdong
Guangdong
to the south, along with Taiwan
Taiwan
150 km to the east, across the Taiwan
Taiwan
strait.[6] The name Fujian
Fujian
came from the combination of Fuzhou
Fuzhou
and Jianzhou (a former name for Jian'ou) two cities in Fujian, during the Tang dynasty
[...More...]

"Fujian Province" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Traditional Chinese Characters
Traditional Chinese characters
Chinese characters
(traditional Chinese: 正體字/繁體字; simplified Chinese: 正体字/繁体字; Pinyin: Zhèngtǐzì/Fántǐzì) are Chinese characters
Chinese characters
in any character set that does not contain newly created characters or character substitutions performed after 1946. They are most commonly the characters in the standardized character sets of Taiwan, of Hong Kong and Macau
Macau
or in the Kangxi Dictionary
[...More...]

"Traditional Chinese Characters" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Guangdong Province
Guangdong
Guangdong
(Chinese: 广东) is a province in South China, located on the South China
South China
Sea coast. Traditionally romanised as Kwangtung, Guangdong
Guangdong
surpassed Henan
Henan
and Sichuan
Sichuan
to become the most populous province in China
China
in January 2005, registering 79.1 million permanent residents and 31 million migrants who lived in the province for at least six months of the year;[5][6] the total population was 104,303,132 in the 2010 census, accounting for 7.79 percent of Mainland China's population.[7] This also makes it the most populous first-level administrative subdivision of any country outside the former British Raj, as its population is surpassed only by those of the Pakistani province of Punjab[8] and the Indian states of Maharashtra
Maharashtra
and Uttar Pradesh[9]
[...More...]

"Guangdong Province" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Ayutthaya Kingdom
Phitsanulok
Phitsanulok
(1463–1488) Ayutthaya (1488–1666) Lopburi
Lopburi
(1666–1688) Ayutthaya (1688–1767)Languages Ayutthayan ThaiReligion Majority:
[...More...]

"Ayutthaya Kingdom" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse
.