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Terence Conran
Sir Terence Orby Conran, CH, FCSD (born 4 October 1931) is an English designer, restaurateur, retailer and writer.[1]Contents1 Early life and education 2 Work2.1 Honours and awards3 Family 4 Bibliography 5 Biographies 6 See also 7 References 8 External linksEarly life and education[edit] Conran was born in Kingston upon Thames, son of Christina Mabel (Halstead) and South African-born Gerard Rupert Conran, a businessman who owned a rubber importation company in East London.[2] Conran was educated at Highfield School in Liphook, Bryanston School
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Mothercare
Mothercare
Mothercare
plc (LSE: MTC) is a British retailer which specialises in products for expectant mothers and in general merchandise for children up to 6 years old
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J. C. Penney
J. C. Penney
J. C. Penney
(stylized as JCPenney) is an American department store chain with 850 locations[1] in 49 U.S. states, and Puerto Rico.[7] In addition to selling conventional merchandise, JCPenney stores often house several leased departments such as Sephora, Seattle's Best Coffee, salons, auto center, optical centers, portrait studios, and jewelry repair. Most JCPenney stores are located in suburban shopping malls. Before 1966, most of its stores were located in downtown areas. As shopping malls became more popular during the latter half of the 20th century, JCPenney followed the trend by relocating and developing stores to anchor the malls. In more recent years, the chain has continued to follow consumer traffic, echoing the retailing trend of opening some freestanding stores, including some next door to competitors. Certain stores are located in power centers. The company has been an Internet retailer since 1998
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Forest Stewardship Council
The Forest
Forest
Stewardship Council (FSC) is an international non-profit, multi-stakeholder organization established in 1993 to promote responsible management of the world’s forests
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Heals (department Store)
Heal's
Heal's
("Heal and Son Ltd") is a British furniture and furnishing store chain comprising six stores, selling a range of furniture, lighting and home accessories. For over a century, it has been known for promoting modern design and employing talented young designers.[1]Contents1 History1.1 Ambrose Heal 1.2 Heal's
Heal's
at Tottenham Court Road 1.3 Mansard Gallery1.3.1 Exhibition of French Art 1914-19191.4 Guildford
Guildford
store 1.5 Acquisition by Storehouse 1.6 Management buyout 1.7 Acquisition by Wittington Investments 1.8 Recent history2 References 3 External linksHistory[edit] The original Heal's
Heal's
firm was established in 1810 as a feather-dressing business[1] by John Harris Heal and his son.[2] In 1818, the business moved to Tottenham Court Road, London and expanded into bedding, bedstead and furniture manufacture and into retailing
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Caterer And Hotelkeeper
The Caterer is a weekly UK business magazine for hospitality professionals. The publication covers all areas of the hospitality industry (including restaurants, hotels, foodservice, pubs and bars) providing news, analysis and features about senior industry professionals, businesses and trends. It also includes monthly reviews of the latest hospitality products, from kitchen equipment to food and beverages.Contents1 History and profile 2 Events and awards 3 The Caterer Top 100 4 References 5 External linksHistory and profile[edit] Caterer and Hotelkeeper (now The Caterer), first issued in 1878, was published by Reed Business Information
Reed Business Information
until 2012, when it was bought by Travel Weekly Group owner Clive Jacobs.[1] It employs about 30 staff and is based in Victoria, London, UK. It is published by the Travel Weekly Group
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Shoreditch
Shoreditch
Shoreditch
is an inner city district in the East End of London, Central London[1] in the London Borough of Hackney. Shoreditch includes the sub-districts of Hoxton
Hoxton
and Haggerston
Haggerston
and lies immediately to the north and north east of the City of London. Shoreditch High Street railway station
Shoreditch High Street railway station
is just outside Shoreditch
Shoreditch
in the Bethnal Green
Bethnal Green
area of Tower Hamlets
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Chelsea, London
Chelsea is an affluent area of South West London,[2] bounded to the south by the River Thames. Its frontage runs from Chelsea Bridge
Chelsea Bridge
along the Chelsea Embankment, Cheyne Walk, Lots Road and Chelsea Harbour. Its eastern boundary was once defined by the River Westbourne, which is now in a pipe above Sloane Square
Sloane Square
Underground station. The modern eastern boundary is Chelsea Bridge
Chelsea Bridge
Road and the lower half of Sloane Street, including Sloane Square
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Reuters
Reuters
Reuters
(/ˈrɔɪtərz/) is an international news agency headquartered in London, United Kingdom. It is a division of Thomson Reuters. Until 2008, the Reuters
Reuters
news agency formed part of an independent company, Reuters Group
Reuters Group
plc, which was also a provider of financial market data. Since the acquisition of Reuters Group
Reuters Group
by the Thomson Corporation
Thomson Corporation
in 2008, the Reuters
Reuters
news agency has been a part of Thomson Reuters, making up the media division. Reuters
Reuters
transmits news in English, French, German, Italian, Spanish, Portuguese, Russian, Urdu, Arabic, Japanese, Korean, and Chinese
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Saunders-Roe Princess
The Saunders-Roe
Saunders-Roe
SR.45 Princess was a British flying boat aircraft developed and built by Saunders-Roe
Saunders-Roe
at their Cowes
Cowes
facility on the Isle of Wight. It has the distinction of being the largest all-metal flying boat to have ever been constructed.[1] The Princess had been developed to serve as a larger and more luxurious successor to the pre-war commercial flying boats, such as the Short Empire. It was intended to serve the transatlantic route, carrying up to 100 passengers between Southampton, United Kingdom
United Kingdom
and New York City, United States
United States
in spacious and comfortable conditions. To achieve this, it was decided early on to make use of newly developed turboprop technology, opting for the in-developed Bristol Proteus engine to power the aircraft
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South Bank
South Bank
South Bank
is an entertainment and commercial district in central London, next to the River Thames
River Thames
opposite the City of Westminster. It forms a narrow, disproportionate strip of riverside land within the London Borough of Lambeth
London Borough of Lambeth
and the London Borough of Southwark
London Borough of Southwark
where it joins Bankside. As with most central London districts, its edges evolve and are informally defined. However, its central area is bounded by Westminster Bridge
Westminster Bridge
and Blackfriars Bridge
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Festival Of Britain
The Festival of Britain
Festival of Britain
was a national exhibition and fair that reached millions of visitors throughout the United Kingdom
United Kingdom
in the summer of 1951. Historian Kenneth O. Morgan says the Festival was a "triumphant success" as people:flocked to the South Bank
South Bank
site, to wander around the Dome of Discovery, gaze at the Skylon, and generally enjoy a festival of national celebration. Up and down the land, lesser festivals enlisted much civic and voluntary enthusiasm
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Textile
A textile[1] is a flexible material consisting of a network of natural or artificial fibres (yarn or thread). Yarn
Yarn
is produced by spinning raw fibres of wool, flax, cotton, hemp, or other materials to produce long strands.[2] Textiles are formed by weaving, knitting, crocheting, knotting, or felting. The related words fabric[3] and cloth[4] are often used in textile assembly trades (such as tailoring and dressmaking) as synonyms for textile. However, there are subtle differences in these terms in specialized usage. A textile is any material made of interlacing fibres, including carpeting and geotextiles. A fabric is a material made through weaving, knitting, spreading, crocheting, or bonding that may be used in production of further goods (garments, etc.)
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Tower Bridge
Coordinates: 51°30′20″N 0°04′32″W / 51.50556°N 0.07556°W / 51.50556; -0.07556Tower BridgeCoordinates 51°30′20″N 0°04′31″W / 51.5055°N 0.075406°W / 51.5055; -0.075406Coordinates: 51°30′20″N 0°04′31″W / 51.5055°N 0.075406°W / 51.5055; -0.075406Carries A100 Tower Bridge
Tower Bridge
RoadCrosses River ThamesLocale London
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Fleet Street
A street is a public thoroughfare (usually paved) in a built environment. It is a public parcel of land adjoining buildings in an urban context, on which people may freely assemble, interact, and move about. A street can be as simple as a level patch of dirt, but is more often paved with a hard, durable surface such as concrete, cobblestone or brick. Portions may also be smoothed with asphalt, embedded with rails, or otherwise prepared to accommodate non-pedestrian traffic. Originally the word "street" simply meant a paved road (Latin: "via strata"). The word "street" is still sometimes used colloquially as a synonym for "road", for example in connection with the ancient Watling Street, but city residents and urban planners draw a crucial modern distinction: a road's main function is transportation, while streets facilitate public interaction.[1] Examples of streets include pedestrian streets, alleys, and city-centre streets too crowded for road vehicles to pass
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