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Tennessee Aquarium
May 1, 1992 (River Journey Building)[1] April 29, 2005 (Ocean Journey Building)[1]Location Chattanooga, Tennessee, United StatesCoordinates 35°03′21″N 85°18′39″W / 35.0557°N 85.3108°W / 35.0557; -85.3108Coordinates: 35°03′21″N 85°18′39″W / 35.0557°N 85.3108°W / 35.0557; -85.3108No. of animals 12,000[2]No. of species 795 (as of 2013)[3]Volume of largest tank 618,000 US gal (2,340,000 L)[4]Total volume of tanks 1,100,000 US gal (4,200,000 L)[1]Memberships AZAWebsite www.tnaqua.orgThe Tennessee
Tennessee
Aquarium is a non-profit public aquarium located in Chattanooga, Tennessee, United States. It opened in 1992 on the banks of the Tennessee
Tennessee
River in downtown Chattanooga, with a major expansion added in 2005
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Cuttlefish
Cuttlefish
Cuttlefish
or cuttles[2] are marine animals of the order Sepiida. They belong to the class Cephalopoda, which also includes squid, octopuses, and nautiluses. Cuttlefish
Cuttlefish
have a unique internal shell, the cuttlebone. Despite their name, cuttlefish are not fish but molluscs. Cuttlefish
Cuttlefish
have large, W-shaped pupils, eight arms, and two tentacles furnished with denticulated suckers, with which they secure their prey. They generally range in size from 15 to 25 cm (6 to 10 in), with the largest species, Sepia apama, reaching 50 cm (20 in) in mantle length and over 10.5 kg (23 lb) in mass.[3] Cuttlefish
Cuttlefish
eat small molluscs, crabs, shrimp, fish, octopus, worms, and other cuttlefish. Their predators include dolphins, sharks, fish, seals, seabirds, and other cuttlefish
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Frog
Archaeobatrachia Mesobatrachia Neobatrachia  – List of Anuran familiesNative distribution of frogs (in green)A frog is any member of a diverse and largely carnivorous group of short-bodied, tailless amphibians composing the order Anura (Ancient Greek ἀν-, without + οὐρά, tail). The oldest fossil "proto-frog" appeared in the early Triassic
Triassic
of Madagascar, but molecular clock dating suggests their origins may extend further back to the Permian, 265 million years ago. Frogs are widely distributed, ranging from the tropics to subarctic regions, but the greatest concentration of species diversity is in tropical rainforests. There are approximately 4,800 recorded species, accounting for over 85% of extant amphibian species. They are also one of the five most diverse vertebrate orders. The body plan of an adult frog is generally characterized by a stout body, protruding eyes, cleft tongue, limbs folded underneath, and the absence of a tail
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American Paddlefish
The American paddlefish
American paddlefish
( Polyodon
Polyodon
spathula) is a species of basal ray-finned fish closely related to sturgeons in the order Acipenseriformes. Fossil records of paddlefish date back over 300 million years, nearly 50 million years before dinosaurs first appeared. American paddlefish
American paddlefish
are smooth-skinned freshwater fish commonly called paddlefish, but are also referred to as Mississippi paddlefish, spoon-billed cats, or spoonbills. They are one of only two extant species in the paddlefish family, Polyodontidae. The other is the critically endangered Chinese paddlefish
Chinese paddlefish
( Psephurus
Psephurus
gladius) endemic to the Yangtze River
Yangtze River
basin in China
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Channel Catfish
The channel catfish ( Ictalurus
Ictalurus
punctatus) is North America's most numerous catfish species. It is the official fish of Kansas, Missouri, Iowa, Nebraska, and Tennessee, and is informally referred to as a "channel cat"
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Alligator Gar
Alligator
Alligator
gar ( Atractosteus
Atractosteus
spatula) are ray-finned euryhaline fish related to bowfin in the infraclass Holostei
Holostei
(ho'-las-te-i). The fossil record traces their existence to the Early Cretaceous over a hundred million years ago. They are the largest species in the gar family, and among the largest freshwater fishes in North America. Gars are often referred to as "primitive fishes", or "living fossils" because they have retained some morphological characteristics of their earliest ancestors, such as a spiral valve intestine which is also common to the digestive system of sharks, and the ability to breathe both air and water. Their common name was derived from their resemblance to the American alligator, particularly their broad snout and long sharp teeth
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Arapaima
The arapaima, pirarucu, or paiche are any large species of bonytongue in the genus Arapaima
Arapaima
native to the Amazon and Essequibo basins of South America. Genus Arapaima
Arapaima
is the type genus of the family Arapaimidae.[1][2] They are among the world's largest freshwater fish, reaching as much as 3 m (9.8 ft).[1] They are an important food fish. They have declined in the native range due to overfishing and habitat loss[citation needed]
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Giant Pangasius
The giant pangasius, paroon shark, pangasid-catfish[1] or Chao Phraya giant catfish (Pangasius sanitwongsei) is a species of freshwater fish in the shark catfish family (Pangasiidae) of order Siluriformes, found in the Chao Phraya and Mekong basins in Indochina. Its populations have declined drastically, mainly due to overfishing, and it is now considered Critically Endangered.[1]Contents1 Etymology 2 Physical characteristics 3 Behavior 4 Relationship to humans 5 See also 6 ReferencesEtymology[edit] The specific name sanitwongsei was chosen to honor M. R. Suwaphan Sanitwong (Thai: ม.ร.ว.สุวพรรณ สนิทวงศ์) for his support of fisheries in Thailand.[2] Physical characteristics[edit]Giant pangasius in Prague Sea aquariumThe giant pangasius is pigmented with dusky melanophores. It has a wide, flat, whiskerless head. It has a silver, curved underside and a dark brown back
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Redtail Catfish
The redtail catfish, Phractocephalus hemioliopterus, is a pimelodid (long-whiskered) catfish. In Venezuela it is known as cajaro and in Brazil it is known as pirarara.[2] It is the only extant species of the genus Phractocephalus. This fish is common in the aquarium trade, although its massive adult size makes it unsuitable for all but the largest aquariums.[3]Contents1 Extinct Phractocephalus 2 Description 3 Distribution and habitat 4 Relationship to humans4.1 In the aquarium5 See also 6 ReferencesExtinct Phractocephalus[edit] Although the redtail catfish is the only living representative of this genus, there are other members that date back to the upper Miocene and only are known from fossil remains. P. nassi was described in 2003, and is from Urumaco, Venezuela
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Giant Freshwater Stingray
Himantura
Himantura
chaophraya Monkolprasit & Roberts, 1990 Trygon polylepis Bleeker, 1852The giant freshwater stingray ( Himantura
Himantura
polylepis, also widely known by the junior synonym H. chaophraya) is a species of stingray in the family Dasyatidae. It is found in large rivers and estuaries in Indochina
Indochina
and Borneo, though historically it may have been more widely distributed in South and Southeast Asia. One of the largest freshwater fish in the world, this species grows upwards of 1.9 m (6.2 ft) across and may reach 600 kg (1,300 lb) in weight. It has a relatively thin, oval pectoral fin disc that is widest anteriorly, and a sharply pointed snout with a protruding tip. Its tail is thin and whip-like, and lacks fin folds
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Turtle
Cryptodira Pleurodira †Meiolaniidae and see textDiversity14 extant families with 356 speciesblue: sea turtles, black: land turtlesThis article's lead section may not adequately summarize its contents. To comply with's lead section guidelines, please consider modifying the lead to provide an accessible overview of the article's key points in such a way that it can stand on its own as a concise version of the article. (discuss). (January 2018)Turtles are reptiles of the order Testudines
Testudines
(or Chelonii[3]) characterized by a special bony or cartilaginous shell developed from their ribs and acting as a shield.[4] "Turtle" may refer to the order as a whole (American English) or to fresh-water and sea-dwelling testudines (British English).[5] The order Testudines
Testudines
includes both extant (living) and extinct species
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Seahorse
see Species. Seahorse
Seahorse
(also written sea-horse and sea horse) is the name given to 54 species of small marine fishes in the genus Hippocampus. "Hippocampus" comes from the Ancient Greek
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Hyacinth Macaw
The hyacinth macaw ( Anodorhynchus
Anodorhynchus
hyacinthinus), or hyacinthine macaw, is a parrot native to central and eastern South America. With a length (from the top of its head to the tip of its long pointed tail) of about 100 cm (3.3 ft) it is longer than any other species of parrot. It is the largest macaw and the largest flying parrot species, though the flightless kakapo of New Zealand can outweigh it at up to 3.5 kg. While generally easily recognized, it can be confused with the far rarer and smaller Lear's macaw
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Twitter
Twitter
Twitter
(/ˈtwɪtər/) is an online news and social networking service on which users post and interact with messages known as "tweets". Tweets were originally restricted to 140 characters, but on November 7, 2017, this limit was doubled for all languages except Japanese, Korean, and Chinese.[11] Registered users can post tweets, but those who are unregistered can only read them. Users access Twitter
Twitter
through its website interface, through Short Message Service
Short Message Service
(SMS) or mobile-device application software ("app").[12] Twitter, Inc. is based in San Francisco, California, and has more than 25 offices around the world.[13] Twitter
Twitter
was created in March 2006 by Jack Dorsey, Noah Glass, Biz Stone, and Evan Williams and launched in July of that year. The service rapidly gained worldwide popularity
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Batoidea
Batoidimorpha MyliobatoideaSpotted eagle ray, Aetobatus narinari Batoidea
Batoidea
is a superorder of cartilaginous fish commonly known as rays. They and their close relatives, the sharks, comprise the subclass Elasmobranchii. Rays are the largest group of cartilaginous fishes, with well over 600 species in 26 families. Rays are distinguished by their flattened bodies, enlarged pectoral fins that are fused to the head, and gill slits that are placed on their ventral surfaces.Contents1 Anatomy 2 Reproduction 3 Habitat 4 Feeding 5 Classification 6 Differences between sharks and rays 7 See also 8 References8.1 Notes 8.2 Bibliography9 External linksAnatomy[edit] Batoids are flat-bodied, and, like sharks, are cartilaginous marine fish, meaning they have a boneless skeleton made of a tough, elastic substance
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Butterfly Zoo
A butterfly house, conservatory, or lepidopterarium is a facility which is specifically intended for the breeding and display of butterflies with an emphasis on education. Some butterfly houses also feature other insects and arthropods
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