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Temujin
Genghis Khan
Genghis Khan
or Chinggis Khaan[note 3] (born Temüjin,[note 4] c. 1162 – August 18, 1227), was the founder and first Great Khan of the Mongol
Mongol
Empire, which became the largest contiguous empire in history after his death. He came to power by uniting many of the nomadic tribes of Northeast Asia. After founding the Empire and being proclaimed "Genghis Khan", he launched the Mongol invasions
Mongol invasions
that conquered most of Eurasia. Campaigns initiated in his lifetime include those against the Qara Khitai, Caucasus, and Khwarazmian, Western Xia and Jin dynasties. These campaigns were often accompanied by large-scale massacres of the civilian populations – especially in the Khwarazmian and Western Xia
Western Xia
controlled lands
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Genghis Khan (other)
Genghis Khan
Genghis Khan
(c
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Caucasus
 Abkhazia Artsakh South OssetiaAutonomous republics and federal regions Russia Adygea  Chechnya  Dagestan  Ingushetia  Kabardino-Balkaria Karachay-Cherkessia  Krasnodar Krai North Ossetia-Alania  Stavropol Krai Georgia Adjara Abkhazia (since 2008, in exile) Azerbaijan NakhchivanDemonym CaucasianTime Zones UTC+02:00, UTC+03:00, UTC+03:30, UTC+4:00, UTC+04:30The Caucasus
Caucasus
/ˈkɔːkəsəs/ or Caucasia /kɔːˈkeɪʒə/ is a region located at the border of
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Dynasty
A dynasty (UK: /ˈdɪnəsti/, US: /ˈdaɪnəsti/) is a sequence of rulers from the same family,[1] usually in the context of a feudal or monarchical system, but sometimes also appearing in elective republics. The dynastic family or lineage may be known as a "house",[2] which may be styled as "royal", "princely", "ducal", "comital", etc., depending upon the chief or present title borne by its members. Historians periodize the histories of many sovereign states, such as Ancient Egypt, the Carolingian Empire
Carolingian Empire
and Imperial China, using a framework of successive dynasties. As such, the term "dynasty" may be used to delimit the era during which the family reigned and to describe events, trends, and artifacts of that period ("a Ming-dynasty vase")
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Yesügei
Yesugei
Yesugei
Baghatur or Yesükhei (Modern Mongolian: Есүхэй баатар, Yesukhei baatar), was a major chief of the Khamag Mongol confederation and the father of Temüjin, later known as Genghis Khan. He was of Borjigin
Borjigin
family, and his name literally means "like nine", meaning he had the auspicious qualities of the number nine, a lucky number to the Mongols. Life[edit] Yesügei was the son of Bartan Baghatur, who was the second son of Khabul Khan, who was recognized as a khagan by the Jin Dynasty. Khabul Khan was, in turn, the grandson of the Mongol chief Khaidu, the first to try to unite all of the Mongols
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World's Largest Empires
This is a list of the largest empires in world history, but the list is not and cannot be definitive since the decision about which entities to consider as "empires" is difficult and fraught with controversy. An empire involves the extension of a state's sovereignty over external territories and a variety of different ethnic groups. The term "empire" in this context (not necessarily a state ruled by an emperor) does not have a precise definition, but is generally applied to political entities that are considered to be especially large by the standards of their time and that have acquired a significant part of their territory by conquest.Contents1 Measurement 2 Largest empires by land area2.1 Empires at their greatest extent3 See also3.1 General 3.2 By era 3.3 By region 3.4 By size4 Notes and referencesMeasurement[edit]This section needs expansion. You can help by adding to it
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Nomadic Tribe
A nomad (Greek: νομάς, nomas, plural tribe) is a member of a community of people who live in different locations, moving from one place to another in search of grasslands for their animals.[2] Among the various ways nomads relate to their environment, one can distinguish the hunter-gatherer, the pastoral nomad owning livestock, or the "modern" peripatetic nomad. As of 1995, there were an estimated 30–40 million nomads in the world.[3] Nomadic hunting and gathering, following seasonally available wild plants and game, is by far the oldest human subsistence method.[citation needed] Pastoralists raise herds, driving them, or moving with them, in patterns that normally avoid depleting pastures beyond their ability to recover.[citation needed] Nomadism is also a lifestyle adapted to infertile regions such as steppe, tundra, or ice and sand, where mobility is the most efficient strategy for exploiting scarce resources
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Northeast Asia
Terms such as Northeast Asia, North East Asia
East Asia
or Northeastern Asia refer to a subregion of Asia: the northeastern landmass and islands, bordering the Pacific Ocean. It includes, paradoxically, the core countries of East Asia
East Asia
(see map). The term Northeast Asia
Asia
was popularized during the 1930s by the US historian and political scientist Robert Kerner
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Mongol Invasions
Mongol invasions and conquests
Mongol invasions and conquests
took place throughout the 13th century, resulting in the vast Mongol Empire, which by 1300 covered much of Asia
Asia
and Eastern Europe. Historians[which?] regard the destruction under the Mongol Empire
Mongol Empire
as results of some of the deadliest conflicts in human history. In addition, Mongol expeditions may have brought the bubonic plague along with them, spreading it across much of Asia
Asia
and Europe and helping cause massive loss of life in the Black Death
Black Death
of the 14th century.[1][need quotation to verify][2][3][need quotation to verify][4] The Mongol Empire
Mongol Empire
developed in the course of the 13th century through a series of conquests and invasions throughout Asia, reaching Eastern Europe by the 1240s
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Mongol Invasions And Conquests
Mongol invasions and conquests
Mongol invasions and conquests
took place throughout the 13th century, resulting in the vast Mongol Empire, which by 1300 covered much of Asia
Asia
and Eastern Europe. Historians[which?] regard the destruction under the Mongol Empire
Mongol Empire
as results of some of the deadliest conflicts in human history. In addition, Mongol expeditions may have brought the bubonic plague along with them, spreading it across much of Asia
Asia
and Europe and helping cause massive loss of life in the Black Death
Black Death
of the 14th century.[1][need quotation to verify][2][3][need quotation to verify][4] The Mongol Empire
Mongol Empire
developed in the course of the 13th century through a series of conquests and invasions throughout Asia, reaching Eastern Europe by the 1240s
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Eurasia
Eurasia
Eurasia
/jʊəˈreɪʒə/ is a combined continental landmass of Europe and Asia.[3][4][5] The term is a portmanteau of its constituent continents ( Europe
Europe
and Asia)
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Mongol Conquest Of The Qara Khitai
Mongol EmpireUyghurs KarluksBadakhshani Hunters Qara KhitaiCommanders and leadersJebe Kuchlug Units involvedTwo tumens unknownStrength20,000 total unknown, over 30,000Casualties and lossesminimal unknownv t eMongol invasions and conquestsAsiaBurmaFirstNgasaunggyan PaganSecondCentral AsiaQara Khitai KhwarezmChinaWestern Xia Jin Song Dali ZiqiJapanBun'ei KōanVietnamBạch ĐằngOther invasionsIndia Java Korea TibetEuropeRus' Volga Bulgaria (Samara Bend, Bilär) Dzurdzuketia (Chechnya) Poland (first) Hungary (first) Bulgaria and Serbia Latin Empire Poland (second) Thrace Hungary (second) Poland (third) Serbia (second)Near EastKhwarezmia Armenia Georgia Anatolia (Köse Dağ) Baghdad Levant Palestine (Ain Jalut)The Mongol Empire
Mongol Empire
conquered the Qara Khitai
Qara Khitai
in the years 1216–1218 AD
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Mongol Invasion Of Khwarezmia
Disputed (see below). Estimates include:75,000 120,000–200,000 700,000 150,000 800,000Disputed (see below)
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Tolui
Tolui, (Classic Mongolian: ᠲᠥᠯᠦᠢ Toluy, Tului, Mongolian: Тулуй хаан, Chinese: 拖雷, Tolui Khan (meaning the Khan Tolui)) (c.1191–1232) was the fourth son of Genghis Khan by his chief khatun Börte. His ulus, or territorial inheritance, at his father's death in 1227 was the homelands in Mongolia, and it was he who served as civil administrator in the time it took to confirm Ögedei as second Great Khan of the Mongol Empire (1206–1368). Before that he had served with distinction in the campaigns against the Jin dynasty, the Western Xia and the Khwarezmid Empire, where he was instrumental in the capture and massacre at Merv and Nishapur. He is a direct ancestor of most of the Emperors of Mongolia and the Ilkhanids. Tolui never used the title of Khagan himself; neither Genghis Khan nor his immediate three successors would ever use any reigning titles unlike the neighboring Chinese dynasties in the south
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Mongol Conquest Of The Jin Dynasty
Decisive Mongol–Song victoryDestruction of the Jin dynastyBelligerentsMongol EmpireKhitans (Eastern Liao) Western Xia
Western Xia
(1210–1219)Song dynasty[1] (1233–34)Jin dynasty Western Xia
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Central Asia
Central Asia
Asia
stretches from the Caspian Sea
Caspian Sea
in the west to China
China
in the east and from Afghanistan
Afghanistan
in the south to Russia
Russia
in the north. It is also colloquially referred to as "the stans" as the countries generally considered to be within the region all have names ending with the Persian suffix "-stan", meaning "land of".[1] Central Asia
Asia
has a population of about 70 million, consisting of five republics: Kazakhstan
Kazakhstan
(pop
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