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Temple Of Hephaestus
The Temple of Hephaestus
Hephaestus
or Hephaisteion (also "Hephesteum"; Ancient Greek: Ἡφαιστεῖον, Greek: Ναός Ηφαίστου) or earlier as the Theseion (also "Theseum"; Ancient Greek: Θησεῖον, Greek: Θησείο), is a well-preserved Greek temple; it remains standing largely as built. It is a Doric peripteral temple, and is located at the north-west side of the Agora
Agora
of Athens, on top of the Agoraios Kolonos hill. From the 7th century until 1834, it served as the Greek Orthodox
Greek Orthodox
church of Saint George
Saint George
Akamates
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Museum
A museum (/mjuːˈziːəm/ mew-ZEE-əm; plural musea or museums) is an institution that cares for (conserves) a collection of artifacts and other objects of artistic, cultural, historical, or scientific importance. Many public museums make these items available for public viewing through exhibits that may be permanent or temporary.[1] The largest museums are located in major cities throughout the world, while thousands of local museums exist in smaller cities, towns and rural areas. Museums have varying aims, ranging from serving researchers and specialists to serving the general public
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Alkamenes
Alcamenes
Alcamenes
(Ancient Greek: Ἀλκαμένης) was an ancient Greek sculptor of Lemnos
Lemnos
and Athens, who flourished in the 2nd half of the 5th century BC. He was a younger contemporary of Phidias
Phidias
and noted for the delicacy and finish of his works, among which a Hephaestus
Hephaestus
and an Aphrodite "of the Gardens" were conspicuous.[1] Pausanias says[2] that he was the author of one of the pediments of the temple of Zeus
Zeus
at Olympia, but this seems a chronological and stylistic impossibility.[1] Pausanias[3] also refers to a statue of Ares by Alcamenes
Alcamenes
that was erected on the Athenian agora, which some have related to the Ares Borghese
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Triglyph
Triglyph
Triglyph
is an architectural term for the vertically channeled tablets of the Doric frieze in classical architecture, so called because of the angular channels in them.The rectangular recessed spaces between the triglyphs on a Doric frieze are called metopes. The raised spaces between the channels themselves (within a triglyph) are called femur in Latin or meros in Greek.[1] In the strict tradition of classical architecture, a set of guttae, the six triangular "pegs" below, always go with a triglyph above (and vice versa), and the pair of features are only found in entablatures of buildings using the Doric order
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Metope (architecture)
In classical architecture, a metope (μετόπη) is a rectangular architectural element that fills the space between two triglyphs in a Doric frieze, which is a decorative band of alternating triglyphs and metopes above the architrave of a building of the Doric order. Metopes often had painted or sculptural decoration; the most famous example are the 92 metopes of the Parthenon marbles
Parthenon marbles
some of which depict the battle between the Centaurs and the Lapiths. The painting on most metopes has been lost, but sufficient traces remain to allow a close idea of their original appearance. In terms of structure, metopes may be carved from a single block with a triglyph (or triglyphs), or they may be cut separately and slide into slots in the triglyph blocks as at the Temple of Aphaea. Sometimes the metopes and friezes were cut from different stone, so as to provide color contrast
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Centaurs
A centaur (/ˈsɛntɔːr/; Greek: Κένταυρος, Kéntauros, Latin: centaurus), or occasionally hippocentaur, is a mythological creature with the upper body of a human and the lower body and legs of a horse.[1][2]Contents1 Mythology1.1 Origin 1.2 Centauromachy2 Other depictions in classical art 3 Theories of origin 4 Indian centaur 5 Female centaurs 6 Persistence in the medieval world 7 Modern day 8 Gallery 9 See also 10 Footnotes 11 References 12 Further reading 13 External linksMythology[edit] Origin[edit] The centaurs were usually said to have been born of Ixion
Ixion
and Nephele (the cloud made in the image of Hera). Another version, however, makes them children of a certain Centaurus, who mated with the Magnesian mares. This Centaurus was either himself the son of Ixion
Ixion
and Nephele (inserting an additional generation) or of Apollo
Apollo
and Stilbe, daughter of the river god Peneus
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Lapiths
The Lapiths
Lapiths
(/ˈlæpɪθs/; Ancient Greek: Λαπίθαι) are a legendary people of Greek mythology, whose home was in Thessaly, in the valley of the Peneus[1] and on the mountain Pelion.Contents1 Mythology1.1 Centauromachy2 Notes 3 References 4 External linksMythology[edit] They were an Aeolian tribe. Like the Myrmidons and other Thessalian tribes, the Lapiths
Lapiths
were natives of Thessaly. The genealogies make them a kindred people with the Centaurs: in one version, Lapithes (Λαπίθης) and Centaurus (Κένταυρος) were said to be twin sons of the god Apollo
Apollo
and the nymph Stilbe, daughter of the river god Peneus. Lapithes was a valiant warrior, but Centaurus was a deformed being who later mated with mares from whom the race of half-man, half-horse Centaurs
Centaurs
then came
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Heracles
Heracles
Heracles
(/ˈhɛrəkliːz/ HERR-ə-kleez; Greek: Ἡρακλῆς, Hēraklēs, from Hēra, "Hera"), born Alcaeus[1] (Ἀλκαῖος, Alkaios) or Alcides[2] (Ἀλκείδης, Alkeidēs), was a divine hero in Greek mythology, the son of Zeus
Zeus
and Alcmene, foster son of Amphitryon[3] and great-grandson and half-brother (as they are both sired by the god Zeus) of Perseus. He was the greatest of the Greek heroes, a paragon of masculinity, the ancestor of royal clans who claimed to be Heracleidae
Heracleidae
(Ἡρακλεῖδαι), and a champion of the Olympian order against chthonic monsters. In Rome and the modern West, he is known as Hercules, with whom the later Roman emperors, in particular Commodus
Commodus
and Maximian, often identified themselves
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Thetis
Thetis
Thetis
(/ˈθɛtɪs/; Greek: Θέτις [tʰétis]), is encountered in Greek mythology
Greek mythology
mostly as a sea nymph or known as the goddess of water, one of the 50 Nereids, daughters of the ancient sea god Nereus.[1] When described as a Nereid
Nereid
in Classical myths, Thetis
Thetis
was the daughter of Nereus
Nereus
and Doris,[2] and a granddaughter of Tethys with whom she sometimes shares characteristics. Often she seems to lead the Nereids as they attend to her tasks. Sometimes she also is identified with Metis. Some sources argue that she was one of the earliest of deities worshipped in Archaic Greece, the oral traditions and records of which are lost
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Mount Olympus
Mount Olympus
Mount Olympus
(/oʊˈlɪmpəs, ə-/;[3] Greek: Όλυμπος Olympos, for Modern Greek
Modern Greek
also transliterated Olimbos, [ˈolimbos] or [ˈolibos]) is the highest mountain in Greece. It is located in the Olympus Range on the border between Thessaly
Thessaly
and Macedonia, between the regional units of Pieria and Larissa, about 80 km (50 mi) southwest from Thessaloniki. Mount Olympus
Mount Olympus
has 52 peaks, deep gorges, and exceptional biodiversity.[4] The highest peak, Mytikas, meaning "nose", rises to 2,918 metres (9,573 ft).[1] It is one of the highest peaks in Europe
Europe
in terms of topographic prominence.[2] Olympus was notable in Greek mythology
Greek mythology
as the home of the Greek gods, on the Mytikas peak
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Labours Of Hercules
The Twelve Labours of Heracles
Heracles
or of Hercules
Hercules
(Greek: οἱ Ἡρακλέους ἆθλοι, hoi Hērakleous athloi)[1][2] are a series of episodes concerning a penance carried out by Heracles, the greatest of the Greek heroes, whose name was later Romanised as Hercules. They were accomplished over 12 years at the service of King Eurystheus. The episodes were later connected by a continuous narrative. The establishment of a fixed cycle of twelve labours was attributed by the Greeks to an epic poem, now lost, written by Peisander, dated about 600 BC.[3] After Hercules
Hercules
killed his wife and children, he went to the oracle at Delphi. He prayed to the god Apollo for guidance. Hercules
Hercules
was told to serve the king of Mycenae, Eurystheus, for 12 years
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Pausanias (geographer)
Pausanias (/pɔːˈseɪniəs/; Greek: Παυσανίας Pausanías; c. AD 110 – c. 180)[1] was a Greek traveler and geographer of the second century AD, who lived in the time of Roman emperors Hadrian, Antoninus Pius, and Marcus Aurelius. He is famous for his Description of Greece (Ancient Greek: Ἑλλάδος Περιήγησις, Hellados Periegesis),[2] a lengthy work that describes ancient Greece from his first-hand observations. This work provides crucial information for making links between classical literature and modern archaeology. Andrew Stewart assesses him as:A careful, pedestrian writer...interested not only in the grandiose or the exquisite but in unusual sights and obscure ritual
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Church (building)
A church building or church house, often simply called a church, is a building used for Christian
Christian
religious activities, particularly for worship services. The term in its architectural sense is most often used by Christians to refer to their religious buildings, but it is sometimes used (by analogy) to refer to buildings of other religions.[1] In traditional Christian
Christian
architecture, the church is often arranged in the shape of a Christian
Christian
cross
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Peristyle
In Hellenistic Greek[1] and Roman architecture[2] a peristyle (/ˈpɛrəˌstaɪl/; from Greek περίστυλος) is a continuous porch formed by a row of columns surrounding the perimeter of building or a courtyard. Tetrastoon (from Greek τετράστῳον, "four arcades") is a rarely used archaic term for this feature. In the Christian ecclesiastical architecture that developed from the Roman basilica, a courtyard peristyle and its garden came to be known as a cloister.Contents1 In Roman architecture 2 Other uses 3 See also 4 Notes 5 External linksIn Roman architecture[edit] In rural settings a wealthy Roman could surround a villa with terraced gardens; within the city Romans created their gardens inside the domus. The peristylium was an open courtyard within the house; the columns or square pillars surrounding the garden supported a shady roofed portico whose inner walls were often embellished with elaborate wall paintings of landscapes and trompe-l'oeil architecture
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Saint George
Saint
Saint
George (Greek: Γεώργιος, Geṓrgios; Latin: Georgius; Coptic: Ⲡⲓⲇⲅⲓⲟⲥ Ⲅⲉⲟⲣⲅⲓⲟⲥ; between AD 256–285 to 23 April 303), according to legend, was a Roman soldier of Greek and Palestinian origin and officer in the Guard of Roman emperor Diocletian, who was sentenced to death for refusing to recant his Christian
Christian
faith. As a Christian
Christian
martyr, he later became one of the most venerated saints in Christianity, and was especially venerated by the Crusaders
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Phaedra (mythology)
In Greek mythology, Phaedra /ˈfiːdrə, ˈfɛdrə/ (Ancient Greek: Φαίδρα, Phaidra) (or Fedra) is the daughter of Minos
Minos
and Pasiphaë, wife of Theseus, sister of Ariadne, and the mother of Demophon of Athens
Demophon of Athens
and Acamas. Phaedra's name derives from the Greek word φαιδρός (phaidros), which meant "bright".Phaedra (1880) by Alexandre CabanelThough married to Theseus, Phaedra fell in love with Hippolytus, Theseus's son by another woman (born to either Hippolyta, queen of the Amazons, or Antiope, her sister). But Hippolytus rejected her. In revenge, Phaedra wrote Theseus
Theseus
a letter that claimed Hippolytus had raped her
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