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Temple Cronan
Temple Cronan
Temple Cronan
is a ruined medieval oratory or chapel built near a holy well in the Burren, County Clare, Ireland. The current building apparently dates from the 12th and 15th centuries, although it may partly incorporate earlier buildings or some of the masonry thereof. It may have been the site of an early Christian monastery. Temple Cronan is located in the civil parish of Carran, eight miles from Corofin and about sixteen miles from Ennis.[2]Contents1 History 2 Construction and building features 3 References 4 External linksHistory[edit] Some have argued on the basis of the existing visible structures that Temple Cronan
Temple Cronan
was originally built to serve as a pagan temple.[2] The current building had a window on the eastern wall as well as a small "Cyclopean" doorway on the west side,[2] which is currently blocked by rubble
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County Clare
County Clare
County Clare
(Irish: Contae an Chláir) is a county in Ireland, in the Mid-West Region and the province of Munster, bordered on the West by the Atlantic Ocean. There is debate if it should be historically considered a part of Connacht. Clare County Council
Clare County Council
is the local authority
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Pilgrimage
A pilgrimage is a journey or search of moral or spiritual significance. Typically, it is a journey to a shrine or other location of importance to a person's beliefs and faith, although sometimes it can be a metaphorical journey into someone's own beliefs. Many religions attach spiritual importance to particular places: the place of birth or death of founders or saints, or to the place of their "calling" or spiritual awakening, or of their connection (visual or verbal) with the divine, to locations where miracles were performed or witnessed, or locations where a deity is said to live or be "housed", or any site that is seen to have special spiritual powers. Such sites may be commemorated with shrines or temples that devotees are encouraged to visit for their own spiritual benefit: to be healed or have questions answered or to achieve some other spiritual benefit. A person who makes such a journey is called a pilgrim
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Doonagore Castle
Doonagore Castle
Doonagore Castle
is a round 16th-century tower house with a small walled enclosure located about 1 km above the coastal village of Doolin
Doolin
in County Clare, Ireland. Its name may be derived from Dún na Gabhair, meaning "the fort of the rounded hills" or the "fort of the goats". Doonagore Castle
Doonagore Castle
is at present a private holiday home, inaccessible to the public.Contents1 Location 2 History 3 Description 4 Today 5 References 6 Further reading 7 External linksLocation[edit] Doonagore Castle
Doonagore Castle
sits on a hill overlooking Doolin
Doolin
Point and, along with a nearby higher radio mast, is used as a navigational point by boats approaching Doolin
Doolin
Pier. It is located in the townland of Doonagore, parish of Killilagh, County Clare
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Geographic Coordinate System
A geographic coordinate system is a coordinate system used in geography that enables every location on Earth to be specified by a set of numbers, letters or symbols.[n 1] The coordinates are often chosen such that one of the numbers represents a vertical position, and two or three of the numbers represent a horizontal position
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992
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International Standard Book Number
"ISBN" redirects here. For other uses, see ISBN (other).International Standard Book
Book
NumberA 13-digit ISBN, 978-3-16-148410-0, as represented by an EAN-13 bar codeAcronym ISBNIntroduced 1970; 48 years ago (1970)Managing organisation International ISBN AgencyNo. of digits 13 (formerly 10)Check digit Weighted sumExample 978-3-16-148410-0Website www.isbn-international.orgThe International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a unique[a][b] numeric commercial book identifier. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each edition and variation (except reprintings) of a book. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book would each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is 13 digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007, and 10 digits long if assigned before 2007
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Water Well
A water well is an excavation or structure created in the ground by digging, driving, boring, or drilling to access groundwater in underground aquifers. The well water is drawn by a pump, or using containers, such as buckets, that are raised mechanically or by hand. Wells were first constructed at least eight thousand years ago and historically vary in construction from a simple scoop in the sediment of a dry watercourse to the stepwells of India, the qanats of Iran, and the shadoofs and sakiehs of India. Placing a lining in the well shaft helps create stability and linings of wood or wickerwork date back at least as far as the Iron
Iron
Age. Wells have been traditionally sunk by hand digging as is the case in rural developing areas. These wells are inexpensive and low-tech as they use mostly manual labour and the structure can be lined with brick or stone as the excavation proceeds
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Romanesque Art
Romanesque art
Romanesque art
is the art of Europe from approximately 1000 AD to the rise of the Gothic style in the 12th century, or later, depending on region. The preceding period is known as the Pre-Romanesque
Pre-Romanesque
period. The term was invented by 19th-century art historians, especially for Romanesque architecture, which retained many basic features of Roman architectural style – most notably round-headed arches, but also barrel vaults, apses, and acanthus-leaf decoration – but had also developed many very different characteristics. In Southern France, Spain
Spain
and Italy
Italy
there was an architectural continuity with the Late Antique, but the Romanesque style was the first style to spread across the whole of Catholic Europe, from Sicily to Scandinavia
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Gable
A gable is the generally triangular portion of a wall between the edges of intersecting roof pitches. The shape of the gable and how it is detailed depends on the structural system used, which reflects climate, material availability, and aesthetic concerns. A gable wall or gable end more commonly refers to the entire wall, including the gable and the wall below it. A variation of the gable is a crow-stepped gable, which has a stairstep design to accomplish the sloping portion. Gable
Gable
ends of more recent buildings are often treated in the same way as the Classic pediment form. But unlike Classical structures, which operate through trabeation, the gable ends of many buildings are actually bearing-wall structures
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Corbel
In architecture a corbel is a structural piece of stone, wood or metal jutting from a wall to carry a superincumbent weight, a type of bracket.[1] A corbel is a solid piece of material in the wall, whereas a console is a piece applied to the structure
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High Cross
A high cross or standing cross (Irish: cros ard / ardchros,[1] Scottish Gaelic: crois àrd / àrd-chrois, Welsh: croes uchel / croes eglwysig) is a free-standing Christian cross
Christian cross
made of stone and often richly decorated. There was a unique Early Medieval
Early Medieval
tradition in Ireland
Ireland
and Britain of raising large sculpted stone crosses, usually outdoors. These probably developed from earlier traditions using wood, perhaps with metalwork attachments, and earlier pagan Celtic memorial stones; the Pictish stones
Pictish stones
of Scotland may also have influenced the form
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Termonn
Termonn is an Irish (Gaelic) word meaning "sanctuary, boundary". Other spellings include tearmann, tarman and termondd.[1] It denotes land belonging to Irish early Christian monasteries and churches on which rights of sanctuary prevailed. The word is common in many place names in Ireland.Contents1 Etymology 2 Description 3 Examples 4 ReferencesEtymology[edit] It is derived from Latin
Latin
terminus meaning goal, end point or boundary. In ancient Rome, Terminus was the name of the deity who presided over boundaries and landmarks. The placement of termonns in the Irish landscape suggests they were also associated with transit at boundaries across rivers and bays. Cattle and other moveable forms of wealth were often gathered in them, as mentions of raids on termonns attests. Termonns were often marked by stone boundary markers
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Gothic Architecture
Gothic architecture
Gothic architecture
is an architectural style that flourished in Europe
Europe
during the High and Late Middle Ages. It evolved from Romanesque architecture
Romanesque architecture
and was succeeded by Renaissance
Renaissance
architecture. Originating in 12th century France
France
and lasting into the 16th century, Gothic architecture
Gothic architecture
was known during the period as Opus Francigenum ("French work") with the term Gothic first appearing during the later part of the Renaissance. Its characteristics include the pointed arch, the ribbed vault (which evolved from the joint vaulting of Romanesque architecture) and the flying buttress. Gothic architecture
Gothic architecture
is most familiar as the architecture of many of the great cathedrals, abbeys and churches of Europe
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Tourism In Ireland
Tourism in the Republic of Ireland
Republic of Ireland
is one of the biggest contributors to the Economy of the Republic of Ireland, with 8.7 million people visiting the country in 2016, about 1.8 times Ireland's population.[1][2] Each year about €5bn in revenue is made from economic activities directly related to tourists, accounting for about 4% of GNP and employing over 200,000 people.[3][4] In 2011 alone, Ireland was voted 'Favourite holiday destination in the World' by readers of
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Cronan Mochua
Mo Chua or Crónán mac Bécáin (died 30 March 637) was the founder of Balla, whose diocese was subsequently merged into that of Tuam, Ireland. He is not to be confused (though he often is) with his contemporary Crónán of Roscrea (died 640). His death in 637 is included in the Annals of the Four Masters. Life[edit] He was the son of Becan and descended from Lugaid (from whom were the úi Luigdech) son of Dalann of Ulaid. His mother, Cumne, was daughter of Conamail of the Dal Buain, also of Ulaid. Their family consisted of three sons and three daughters, the least esteemed of the children being Mochua, the hair of whose head, owing to disease, fell out in patches. Saint Comgall of Bangor happening to visit his father's house, and finding him neglected by the family, took him with him to Bangor to educate him
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