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Telegraphy
Telegraphy
Telegraphy
(from Greek: τῆλε têle, "at a distance" and γράφειν gráphein, "to write") is the long-distance transmission of textual or symbolic (as opposed to verbal or audio) messages without the physical exchange of an object bearing the message. Thus semaphore is a method of telegraphy, whereas pigeon post is not. Telegraphy
Telegraphy
requires that the method used for encoding the message be known to both sender and receiver. Many methods are designed according to the limits of the signalling medium used. The use of smoke signals, beacons, reflected light signals, and flag semaphore signals are early examples. In the 19th century, the harnessing of electricity led to the invention of electrical telegraphy. The advent of radio in the early 20th century brought about radiotelegraphy and other forms of wireless telegraphy
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Kelmscott House
Kelmscott
Kelmscott
House is a Georgian brick mansion at 26 Upper Mall in Hammersmith, overlooking the River Thames. It was the London home of English textile designer, artist, writer and socialist William Morris from October 1878 until his death in October 1896.[1] Originally called The Retreat, Morris renamed it after the Oxfordshire village of Kelmscott
Kelmscott
where he had lived at Kelmscott
Kelmscott
Manor from June 1871. Nearby, Morris began his "adventure in printing" with his private press, the Kelmscott
Kelmscott
Press, which he started nearby at 16 Upper Mall in 1891.Contents1 Previous owners 2 Today 3 References 4 Further reading 5 External linksPrevious owners[edit] The property was once owned by Sir Francis Ronalds' family
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Diplomatic Mission
A diplomatic mission or foreign mission[1] is a group of people from one state or an organisation present in another state to represent the sending state/organisation officially in the receiving state. In practice, a diplomatic mission usually denotes the resident mission, namely the embassy, which is the main office of a country's diplomatic representatives in the capital city of another country, whereas consulates are smaller diplomatic missions which are normally located outside the capital of the receiving state (but can be located in the capital, usually when the sending country has no embassy in the receiving state). As well as being a diplomatic mission to the country in which it is situated, it may also be a non-resident permanent mission to one or more other countries
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Continuous Wave
A continuous wave or continuous waveform (CW) is an electromagnetic wave of constant amplitude and frequency, almost always a sine wave, that for mathematical analysis is considered to be of infinite duration. Continuous wave
Continuous wave
is also the name given to an early method of radio transmission, in which a sinusoidal carrier wave is switched on and off
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On-off Keying
On-off keying
On-off keying
(OOK) denotes the simplest form of amplitude-shift keying (ASK) modulation that represents digital data at the presence or absence of a carrier wave.[1] In its simplest form, the presence of a carrier for a specific duration represents a binary one, while its absence for the same duration represents a binary zero. Some more sophisticated schemes vary these durations to convey additional information. It is analogous to unipolar encoding line code. On-off keying
On-off keying
is most commonly used to transmit Morse code
Morse code
over radio frequencies (referred to as CW (continuous wave) operation), although in principle any digital encoding scheme may be used
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Polymath
A polymath (Greek: πολυμαθής, polymathēs, "having learned much,"[1] Latin: homo universalis, "universal man"[citation needed]) is a person whose expertise spans a significant number of different subject areas—such a person is known to draw on complex bodies of knowledge to solve specific problems. In Western Europe, the first work to use polymathy in its title (De Polymathia tractatio: integri operis de studiis veterum) was published in 1603 by Johann von Wower, a Hamburg philosopher.[2][3][4][5] Wower defined polymathy as "knowledge of various matters, drawn from all kinds of studies [...] ranging freely through all the fields of the disciplines, as far as the human mind, with unwearied industry, is able to pursue them".[3] Wower lists erudition, literature, philology, philomathy and polyhistory as synonyms
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Telegraph (other)
A telegraph is any apparatus or process to convey messages over long distances with no intermediary messenger. Telegraph
Telegraph
may also refer to:Contents1 Communication 2 Music 3 Periodicals3.1 Australia 3.2 Canada 3.3 United Kingdom 3.4 United States 3.5 Elsewhere4 Places 5 Other 6 See alsoCommunication[edit]Electrical telegraph, sends and receives messages via electric signals Printing telegraph, electrical telegraph that uses plain text instead of code Optical telegraph, sending visual signals with pivoting shutters in towers Hydraulic telegraph, based on the displacement of water in pipes
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Spanish People
Spain
Spain
Nationals 41,539,400[1] (for a total population of 47,059,533) Hundreds of millions with Spanish ancestors in the Americas especially in the Hispanic
Hispanic
colonies Nationals Abroad : 2
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Samuel Thomas Von Sömmering
Samuel
Samuel
is a figure in the Hebrew Bible
Hebrew Bible
who plays a key role in the narrative, in the transition from the period of the biblical judges to the institution of a kingdom under Saul, and again in the transition from Saul
Saul
to David. He is venerated as a prophet by Jews, Christians, and Muslims
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Foreign Minister
A foreign minister or minister of foreign affairs (less commonly for foreign affairs) is generally a cabinet minister in charge of a state's foreign policy and relations.[1]Contents1 World contexts1.1 Difference in titles 1.2 Powers of position 1.3 Responsibilities2 Related articles and lists2.1 By year 2.2 Country and territory-related articles and lists3 Former countries 4 See also 5 References 6 External linksWorld contexts[edit] Difference in titles[edit] In some nations, such as India, the Foreign Minister is referred to as the " Minister for External Affairs" or, as in the case of Brazil, "Minister of Foreign Affairs" and of the former Soviet Union, this position is known as the "Minister of External Relations". In the United States, the equivalent to the foreign ministry is called the "Department of State", and the equivalent position is known as the "Secretary of State". Other common titles may include "Minister of Foreign Relations"
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Instant Messaging
Instant messaging
Instant messaging
(IM) technology is a type of online chat that offers real-time text transmission over the Internet. A LAN messenger operates in a similar way over a local area network. Short messages are typically transmitted between two parties, when each user chooses to complete a thought and select "send". Some IM applications can use push technology to provide real-time text, which transmits messages character by character, as they are composed. More advanced instant messaging can add file transfer, clickable hyperlinks, Voice over IP, or video chat. Non-IM types of chat include multicast transmission, usually referred to as "chat rooms", where participants might be anonymous or might be previously known to each other (for example collaborators on a project that is using chat to facilitate communication)
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Royal Society
The President, Council and Fellows of the Royal Society
Royal Society
of London for Improving Natural Knowledge,[1] commonly known as the Royal Society, is a learned society. Founded in November 1660, it was granted a royal charter by King Charles II as "The Royal Society".[1] It is the oldest national scientific institution in the world.[2] The society is the United Kingdom's and Commonwealth of Nations' Academy of Sciences
Academy of Sciences
and fulfils a number of roles: promoting science and its benefits, recognising excellence in science, supporting outstanding science, providing scientific advice for policy, fostering international and global co-operation, education and public engagement. The society is governed by its Council, which is chaired by the Society's President, according to a set of statutes and standing orders
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Robert Hooke
Robert Hooke
Robert Hooke
FRS (/hʊk/; 28 July [O.S. 18 July] 1635 – 3 March 1703) was an English natural philosopher, architect and polymath. His adult life comprised three distinct periods: as a scientific inquirer lacking money; achieving great wealth and standing through his reputation for hard work and scrupulous honesty following the great fire of 1666, and eventually becoming ill and party to jealous intellectual disputes (the latter may have contributed to his relative historical obscurity). At one time he was simultaneously the curator of experiments of the Royal Society, a member of its council, Gresham Professor of Geometry, and Surveyor to the City of London
London
after the Great Fire of London
London
(in which capacity he appears to have performed more than half of all the surveys after the fire)
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Richard Lovell Edgeworth
Twenty two, including Maria Edgeworth
Maria Edgeworth
(1768–1849) William Edgeworth
William Edgeworth
(1794–1829) Michael Pakenham Edgeworth
Michael Pakenham Edgeworth
(1812–1881) Edgeworthstown
Edgeworthstown
House, IrelandLibrary at Edgeworthstown
Edgeworthstown
House 1888Edgeworth's proposed optical telegraph for use in Ireland. The rotational position of each one of the four indicators represented a number 1-7 (0 being "rest"), forming a four-digit number
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French Revolution
The French Revolution
Revolution
(French: Révolution française [ʁevɔlysjɔ̃ fʁɑ̃sɛːz]) was a period of far-reaching social and political upheaval in France
France
and its colonies that lasted from 1789 until 1799. It was partially carried forward by Napoleon
Napoleon
during the later expansion of the French Empire. The Revolution
Revolution
overthrew the monarchy, established a republic, catalyzed violent periods of political turmoil, and finally culminated in a dictatorship under Napoleon
Napoleon
who brought many of its principles to areas he conquered in Western Europe and beyond
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Lille
1 French Land Register data, which excludes lakes, ponds, glaciers > 1 km2 (0.386 sq mi or 247 acres) and river estuaries. 2 Population without double counting: residents of multiple communes (e.g., students and military personnel) only counted once. Lille
Lille
(French pronunciation: [lil] ( listen); Dutch: Rijsel pronounced [ˈrɛi̯səl]; West Flemish: Rysel) is a city at the northern tip of France, in French Flanders
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