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Telautograph
The telautograph, an analog precursor to the modern fax machine, transmits electrical impulses recorded by potentiometers at the sending station to servomechanisms attached to a pen at the receiving station, thus reproducing at the receiving station a drawing or signature made by the sender. It was the first such device to transmit drawings to a stationary sheet of paper; previous inventions in Europe had used rotating drums to make such transmissions. The telautograph's invention is attributed to Elisha Gray, who patented it on July 31, 1888
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TIFF
Tagged Image File Format, abbreviated TIFF or TIF, is a computer file format for storing raster graphics images, popular among graphic artists, the publishing industry,[1] and photographers. TIFF is widely supported by scanning, faxing, word processing, optical character recognition, image manipulation, desktop publishing, and page-layout applications.[2] The format was created by Aldus
Aldus
Corporation for use in desktop publishing. It published the latest version 6.0 in 1992, subsequently updated with an Adobe Systems
Adobe Systems
copyright after the latter acquired Aldus
Aldus
in 1994
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Chicago Union Station
Chicago Union Station
Chicago Union Station
is a major railroad station that opened in 1925 in Chicago, Illinois, replacing an earlier station built in 1881. It is the only remaining intercity rail terminal in Chicago, as well as being the city's primary terminal for commuter trains. The station stands on the west side of the Chicago River
Chicago River
between West Adams Street and West Jackson Boulevard, just outside the Chicago Loop. Including approach and storage tracks, it is about nine and a half city blocks in size. Its facilities are mostly underground, buried beneath streets and skyscrapers. Chicago Union Station
Chicago Union Station
is the third-busiest rail terminal in the United States, after Grand Central Terminal
Grand Central Terminal
and Penn Station in New York City
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Paul Baran
Paul Baran
Paul Baran
(/ˈbærən/; April 29, 1926 – March 26, 2011) was a Polish-born Jewish American engineer who was a pioneer in the development of computer networks. He was one of the two independent inventors of packet switching,[2] which is today the dominant basis for data communications in computer networks worldwide, and went on to start several companies and develop other technologies that are an essential part of modern digital communication.Contents1 Early life 2 Packet switched network design2.1 Selling the idea3 Later work 4 Death 5 Awards and honors 6 See also 7 References 8 External linksEarly life[edit] Paul Baran
Paul Baran
was born in Grodno
Grodno
(then Second Polish Republic, now part of Belarus) on April 29, 1926.[3][4] He was the youngest of three children in a Polish-Jewish family,[5] with the Yiddish
Yiddish
given name "Pesach"
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Timeline Of Communication Technology
Timeline
Timeline
of communication technologyContents1 Graphical overview 2 Pre 20st Century Media Impact 3 20th century 4 21st century 5 See also 6 ReferencesGraphical overview[edit]Pre 20st Century Media Impact[edit]30,000 BC – In ice-age Europe, people mark ivory, bone, and stone with patterns to keep track of time, using a lunar calendar.[1] 14,000 BC – In what is now Mezhirich, Ukraine, the first known artifact with a map on it is made using bone.[1] Prior to 3500BC –
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History Of The Telephone
This history of the telephone chronicles the development of the electrical telephone, and includes a brief review of its predecessors.Contents1 Telephone
Telephone
prehistory1.1 Mechanical devices 1.2 Electrical devices2 Invention of the telephone2.1 Telephone
Telephone
exchange3 Early telephone developments 4 Early commercial instruments 5 20th century developments 6 Women's usage in the 20th century 7 21st century developments 8 See also 9 References 10 Further reading 11 External links Telephone
Telephone
prehistory[edit] Mechanical devices[edit]A 19th century acoustic 'tin can', or 'lover's' telephoneBefore the invention of electromagnetic telephones, mechanical acoustic devices existed for transmitting speech and music over a distance greater than that of normal direct speech
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Trainmaster (occupation)
Rail terminology is a form of technical terminology. The difference between the American term railroad and the international term railway (used by the International Union of Railways
International Union of Railways
and English-speaking countries outside the United States) is the most significant difference in rail terminology. There are also others, due to the parallel development of rail transport systems in different parts of the world. Various global terms are presented here; where a term has multiple names, this is indicated
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Xerox
Xerox
Xerox
Corporation /ˈzɪərɒks/ (also known as Xerox, stylized as xerox since 2008, and previously as XEROX from 1960 to 2008) is an American global corporation that sells print and digital document solutions, and document technology products in more than 160 countries.[3] Xerox
Xerox
is headquartered in Norwalk, Connecticut
Norwalk, Connecticut
(having moved from Stamford, Connecticut
Connecticut
in October 2007),[4] though its largest population of employees is based around Rochester, New York, the area in which the company was founded
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Earth Vs The Flying Saucers
Earth vs. the Flying Saucers (a.k.a. Invasion of the Flying Saucers and Flying Saucers from Outer Space)[2] is a 1956 American black-and-white science fiction film from Columbia Pictures, produced by Charles H. Schneer, directed by Fred F. Sears, that stars Hugh Marlowe and Joan Taylor. Earth vs. the Flying Saucers was released on a double bill with The Werewolf The film's storyline was suggested by the bestselling, non-fiction book Flying Saucers from Outer Space by Maj. Donald Keyhoe.[3] The film's stop-motion animation special effects were created by Ray Harryhausen.Contents1 Plot 2 Cast 3 Production3.1 Visual effects4 Reception 5 Legacy 6 References6.1 Notes 6.2 Bibliography7 External linksPlot[edit] Scientist Dr. Russell Marvin (Hugh Marlowe) and his new bride Carol (Joan Taylor) are driving to work when a flying saucer appears overhead. Without proof of the encounter, other than a tape recording of the ship's sound, Dr
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Whistled Language
Whistled languages use whistling to emulate speech and facilitate communication. A whistled language is a system of whistled communication which allows fluent whistlers to transmit and comprehend a potentially unlimited number of messages over long distances. Whistled languages are different in this respect from the restricted codes sometimes used by herders or animal trainers to transmit simple messages or instructions. Generally, whistled languages emulate the tones or vowel formants of a natural spoken language, as well as aspects of its intonation and prosody, so that trained listeners who speak that language can understand the encoded message. Whistled language is rare compared to spoken language, but it is found in cultures around the world. It is especially common in tone languages where the whistled tones transmit the tones of the syllables (tone melodies of the words)
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Triangle Shirtwaist Factory Fire
Coordinates: 40°43′48″N 73°59′43″W / 40.730085°N 73.995356°W / 40.730085; -73.995356Triangle Shirtwaist
Shirtwaist
Factory fireDate March 25, 1911 (1911-03-25)Time 4:40 PM (Eastern Time)Location Asch Building, Manhattan, New York
New York
CityDeaths 146Non-fatal injuries 71The Triangle Shirtwaist
Shirtwaist
Factory fire in New York City
New York City
on March 25, 1911 was the deadliest industrial disaster in the history of the city, and one of the deadliest in US history. The fire caused the deaths of 146 garment workers – 123 women and 23 men[1] – who died from the fire, smoke inhalation, or falling or jumping to their deaths
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Grand Central Terminal
Grand Central Terminal
Grand Central Terminal
(GCT; also referred to as Grand Central Station or simply as Grand Central) is a commuter and intercity railroad terminal at 42nd Street and Park Avenue
Park Avenue
in Midtown Manhattan
Midtown Manhattan
in New York City, United States. The terminal serves commuters traveling on the Metro-North Railroad
Metro-North Railroad
to Westchester, Putnam, and Dutchess counties in New York, as well as to Fairfield and New Haven counties in Connecticut. The terminal also contains a connection to the New York City Subway at Grand Central–42nd Street. Grand Central Terminal's distinctive architecture and interior design have earned it several landmark designations, including as a U.S. National Historic Landmark
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Interlocking Tower
On a rail transport system, signalling control is the process by which control is exercised over train movements by way of railway signals and block systems to ensure that trains operate safely, over the correct route and to the proper timetable. Signalling control
Signalling control
was originally exercised via a decentralised network of control points that were known by a variety of names including signal box (International and British), interlocking tower (North America), signal poste (France) and signal cabin (some railways e.g., GCR). Currently these decentralised systems are being consolidated into wide scale signalling centres or dispatch offices. Whatever the form, signalling control provides an interface between the human signal operator and the lineside signalling equipment
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Chicago
Chicago
Chicago
(/ʃɪˈkɑːɡoʊ, -ˈkɔː-/ ( listen)), officially the City
City
of Chicago, is the third most populous city in the United States. With over 2.7 million residents, it is also the most populous city in both the state of Illinois
Illinois
and the Midwestern United States. It is the county seat of Cook County
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World's Columbian Exposition
The World's Columbian Exposition
World's Columbian Exposition
(the official shortened name for the World's Fair: Columbian Exposition,[1] also known as the Chicago World's Fair and Chicago
Chicago
Columbian Exposition) was a world's fair held in Chicago
Chicago
in 1893
1893
to celebrate the 400th anniversary of Christopher Columbus's arrival in the New World
New World
in 1492.[2] The centerpiece of the Fair, the large water pool, represented the long voyage Columbus took to the New World. Chicago
Chicago
bested New York City; Washington, D.C.; and St. Louis
St. Louis
for the honor of hosting the fair
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Pen
A pen is a writing instrument used to apply ink to a surface, usually paper, for writing or drawing.[1] Historically, reed pens, quill pens, and dip pens were used, with a nib dipped in ink. Ruling pens allow precise adjustment of line width, and still find a few specialized uses, but technical pens such as the Rapidograph are more commonly used. Modern types include ballpoint, rollerball, fountain and felt or ceramic tip pens.[2]Contents1 Types of pens1.1 Modern 1.2 Historic2 History 3 See also 4 Notes and references 5 External linksTypes of pens[edit] Modern[edit] The main modern types of pens can be categorized by the kind of writing tip or point on the pen:An inexpensive ballpoint penA ballpoint pen dispenses an oil-based ink by rolling a small hard sphere, usually 0.5–1.2 mm and made of brass, steel, or tungsten carbide.[3] The ink dries almost immediately on contact with paper
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