HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Ted Koppel
Edward James Martin "Ted" Koppel (born February 8, 1940) is a British-born American broadcast journalist, best known as the anchor for Nightline, from the program's inception in 1980 until 2005. Before Nightline, he spent twenty years as a broadcast journalist and news anchor for ABC. After becoming host of Nightline, he was regarded as one of the most "outstanding" of the serious-minded interviewers on American television. Five years after its 1980 debut the show had a nightly audience of some seven and a half million viewers.[2] His audience was made up of people who appreciated the "plain speaking, articulateness, and topical urgency" that his late-night interviews with politicians and celebrities presented.[3] After leaving Nightline, Koppel worked as managing editor for the Discovery Channel, a news analyst for NPR
NPR
and BBC World News America and a contributor to Rock Center
Rock Center
with Brian Williams
[...More...]

"Ted Koppel" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Nelson, Lancashire
Lancashire
Lancashire
(/ˈlæŋkəʃər/ LANG-kə-shər, /-ʃɪər/ -sheer or, locally, [ˈɫaŋkɪʃə(ɻ)];[2] abbreviated Lancs.) is a county in north west England. The county town is Lancaster although the administrative centre is Preston. The county has a population of 1,449,300 and an area of 1,189 square miles (3,080 km2). People from Lancashire
Lancashire
are known as Lancastrians. The history of Lancashire
Lancashire
begins with its founding in the 12th century. In the Domesday Book
Domesday Book
of 1086, some of its lands were treated as part of Yorkshire. The land that lay between the Ribble and Mersey, Inter Ripam et Mersam, was included in the returns for Cheshire
[...More...]

"Nelson, Lancashire" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

WMCA (AM)
WMCA (570 AM, "The Mission") is an AM radio station in New York City, owned by Salem Media Group
Salem Media Group
and broadcasting with a Christian radio format consisting of teaching and talk programs
[...More...]

"WMCA (AM)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Lancashire, England
Lancashire (/ˈlæŋkəʃər/ LANG-kə-shər, /-ʃɪər/ -sheer or, locally, [ˈɫaŋkɪʃə(ɻ)];[2] abbreviated Lancs.) is a county in north west England. The county town is Lancaster although the administrative centre is Preston. The county has a population of 1,449,300 and an area of 1,189 square miles (3,080 km2). People from Lancashire are known as Lancastrians. The history of Lancashire begins with its founding in the 12th century. In the Domesday Book of 1086, some of its lands were treated as part of Yorkshire. The land that lay between the Ribble and Mersey, Inter Ripam et Mersam, was included in the returns for Cheshire. When its boundaries were established, it bordered Cumberland, Westmorland, Yorkshire, and Cheshire. Lancashire emerged as a major commercial and industrial region during the Industrial Revolution. Liverpool and Manchester grew into its largest cities, dominating global trade and the birth of modern industrial capitalism
[...More...]

"Lancashire, England" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Enemy Alien
An enemy or a foe is an individual or a group that is verified as forcefully adverse or threatening. The concept of an enemy has been observed to be "basic for both individuals and communities".[1] The term "enemy" serves the social function of designating a particular entity as a threat, thereby invoking an intense emotional response to that entity.[2] The state of being or having an enemy is enmity, foehood or foeship.Contents1 Terms 2 As a function of social science 3 In literature 4 Treatment4.1 Religious doctrines5 See also 6 References 7 External linksTerms[edit] Duel
Duel
between two enemiesThe term enemy is derived from Latin for "bad friend" (Latin: inimicus).[3] "Enemy" is a strong word, and "emotions associated with the enemy would include anger, hatred, frustration, envy, jealousy, fear, distrust, and possibly grudging respect".[2] As a political concept, an enemy is likely to be met with hate, violence, battle and war
[...More...]

"Enemy Alien" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Isle Of Man
The Isle of Man
Isle of Man
(Manx: Ellan Vannin [ˈɛlʲən ˈvanɪn]), also known simply as Mann (/mæn/; Manx: Mannin [ˈmanɪn]), is a self-governing British Crown dependency in the Irish Sea
Irish Sea
between the islands of Great Britain and Ireland. The head of state is Queen Elizabeth II, who holds the title of Lord of Mann
Lord of Mann
and is represented by a Lieutenant Governor. Defence is the responsibility of the United Kingdom. Ranked by the World Bank
World Bank
as the 5th richest nation in the world by GDP per capita,[6] the largest sectors are insurance and eGaming with 17% of GNP each, followed by ICT and banking with 9% each.[7] The island has been inhabited since before 6500 BC. Gaelic cultural influence began in the 5th century and the Manx language, a branch of the Gaelic languages, emerged
[...More...]

"Isle Of Man" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Edward R. Murrow
Edward R. Murrow
Edward R. Murrow
KBE (born Egbert Roscoe Murrow;[1] April 25, 1908 – April 27, 1965) was an American broadcast journalist and war correspondent. He first gained prominence during World War II
World War II
with a series of live radio broadcasts from Europe for the news division of the Columbia Broadcasting System (CBS). During the war he recruited and worked closely with a team of war correspondents who came to be known as the Murrow Boys. A pioneer of radio and television news broadcasting, Murrow produced a series of reports on his television program See It Now which helped lead to the censure of Senator Joseph McCarthy
[...More...]

"Edward R. Murrow" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

The Blitz
The Blitz
The Blitz
was a German bombing offensive against Britain in 1940 and 1941, during the Second World War
[...More...]

"The Blitz" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Mass Communications
Mass communication is the study of how people exchange information through mass media to large segments of the population at the same time. In other words, mass communication refers to the imparting and exchanging of information on a large scale to a wide range of people. It is usually understood to relate newspaper, magazine, and book publishing, as well as radio, television and film, even via internet as these mediums are used for disseminating information, news and advertising. Mass communication differs from the studies of other forms of communication, such as interpersonal communication or organizational communication, in that it focuses on a single source transmitting information to a large number of receivers
[...More...]

"Mass Communications" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Political Science
Political science is a social science which deals with systems of governance, and the analysis of political activities, political thoughts and political behavior.[1] It deals extensively with the theory and practice of politics which is commonly thought of as determining of the distribution of power and resources. Political scientists "see themselves engaged in revealing the relationships underlying political events and conditions, and from these revelations they attempt to construct general principles about the way the world of politics works."[2] Political science comprises numerous subfields, including comparative politics, political economy, international relations, political theory, public administration, public policy, and political methodology
[...More...]

"Political Science" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Copyboy
A copy boy is a typically young and junior worker on a newspaper. The job involves taking typed stories from one section of a newspaper to another. According to Bruce Guthrie, the former editor-in-chief of the Herald Sun
Herald Sun
who began work there as a copy boy in 1972:Reporters typed their stories on slips of butcher's paper...then a copy boy ran the story into the neighbouring subs' [sub-editor's] room, hence the cry of 'copy'
[...More...]

"Copyboy" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

New York Times
The New York Times
The New York Times
(sometimes abbreviated as The NYT or The Times) is an American newspaper based in New York City
New York City
with worldwide influence and readership.[6][7][8] Founded in 1851, the paper has won 122 Pulitzer Prizes, more than any other newspaper.[9][10] As of September 2016, it had the largest combined print-and-digital circulation of any daily newspaper in the United States.[11] The New York Times is ranked 18th in the world by circulation. The paper is owned by The New York Times
The New York Times
Company, which is publicly traded but primarily controlled by the Ochs-Sulzberger family through a dual-class share structure.[12] It has been owned by the family since 1896; A.G
[...More...]

"New York Times" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

ABC Radio News
ABC News Radio is the radio service of ABC News, a division of the ABC Television Network in the United States. Formerly known as ABC Radio News, ABC News Radio feeds, through Skyview Networks with newscasts on the hour to its affiliates. ABC News Radio is the largest commercial radio news organization in the US. ABC Radio aired the first broadcast report of the assassination of President John F. Kennedy on November 22, 1963. Kennedy was shot in Dallas, Texas, at 18:30 UTC and Don Gardiner anchored the initial bulletin at 18:36:50 UTC, minutes before any other radio or television network.Contents1 History 2 Format 3 News & Comment 4 Affiliate stations 5 Correspondents5.1 Notable former on-air staff6 See also 7 References 8 External linksHistory[edit] Beginning in the late 1950s, ABC fed hourly newscasts to affiliates at 5 minutes before the hour until January 1, 1968, when the singular ABC radio network was split into four separate and distinct programming services
[...More...]

"ABC Radio News" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Nazism
National Socialism
Socialism
(German: Nationalsozialismus), more commonly known as Nazism
Nazism
(/ˈnɑːtsi.ɪzəm, ˈnæt-/),[1] is the ideology and practices associated with the 20th-century German Nazi Party
Nazi Party
in Nazi Germany and of other far-right groups with similar aims
[...More...]

"Nazism" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Kennedy Assassination
President of the United StatesPresidencyTimeline1960 CampaignElectionInaugurationNew Frontier Foreign PolicyDoctrine"A Strategy of Peace" Bay of PigsCuban Missile Crisis Civil Rights AddressPartial Nuclear Test Ban TreatyClean Air Peace Corps"We choose to go to the Moon"Space programsMercury Gemini ApolloAppointmentsCabinet JudgesAssassination and legacyNovember 22, 1963 State Funeral Eternal Flame Memorials Library Legacy Cultural depictionsv t eJohn F. Kennedy, the 35th President of the United States, was assassinated on Friday, November 22, 1963, at 12:30 p.m. in Dallas, Texas while riding in a presidential motorcade in Dealey Plaza.[1] Kennedy was riding with his wife Jacqueline, Texas Governor John Connally, and Connally's wife, Nellie, and was fatally shot by former U.S. Marine[2] Lee Harvey Oswald
[...More...]

"Kennedy Assassination" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Civil Rights Movement
The civil rights movement (also known as the African-American civil rights movement, American civil rights movement and other terms)[b] was a decades long movement with the goal of securing legal rights for African Americans
African Americans
that other Americans
Americans
already held. With roots starting in the Reconstruction era
Reconstruction era
during the late 19th century, the movement resulted in the largest legislative impacts after the direct actions and grassroots protests organized from the mid-1950s until 1968
[...More...]

"Civil Rights Movement" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.