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Ted Fio Rito
Theodore Salvatore Fiorito (December 20, 1900 – July 22, 1971),[1] known professionally as Ted Fio Rito, was an American composer, orchestra leader, and keyboardist, on both the piano and the Hammond organ, who was popular on national radio broadcasts in the 1920s and 1930s. His name is sometimes given as Ted Fiorito or Ted FioRito.Contents1 Biography 2 Radio remotes2.1 Radio in the 1930s3 Motion picture career 4 References in popular culture 5 Chart successes 6 Other songs and recordings 7 References 8 Listen to 9 External linksBiography[edit]Fio Rito on the air with Clara, Lu, and Em, 1936. He led his band while playing the piano.He was born Teodorico Salvatore Fiorito in Newark, New Jersey
Newark, New Jersey
to an Italian immigrant couple, tailor Louis (Luigi) Fiorito and Eugenia Cantalupo Fiorito, when they were both 21 years old; and he was delivered by a midwife at their 293 15th Avenue residence
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Newark, New Jersey
Newark (/ˈnjuːərk/,[24] locally /njʊərk/)[25] is the most populous city in the U.S. state
U.S. state
of New Jersey
New Jersey
and the seat of Essex County.[26] As one of the nation's major air, shipping, and rail hubs, the city had a population of 277,140 in 2010, making it the nation's 67th-most populous municipality, after being ranked 63rd in the nation in 2000.[15] For 2016, the Census Bureau's Population Estimates Program calculated a population of 281,764, an increase of 1.7% from the 2010 enumeration,[13] ranking the city the 70th largest in the nation.[14] Newark is the second largest city in the New York metropolitan area, located approximately 8 miles (13 km) west of lower Manhattan. Settled in 1666 by Puritans from New Haven Colony, Newark is one of the oldest European cities in the United States
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Jackie Gleason
John Herbert Gleason (February 26, 1916 – June 24, 1987) was an American comedian, actor, writer, composer and conductor.[1] Developing a style and characters from growing up in Brooklyn, New York, he was known for his brash visual and verbal comedy, exemplified by his bus driver Ralph Kramden
Ralph Kramden
character in the television series The Honeymooners. By filming the episodes with Electronicams, Gleason was later able to release the series in syndication, which increased its popularity over the years with new audiences. He also developed The Jackie Gleason
Jackie Gleason
Show, which maintained high ratings from the mid-1950s through 1970
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Muzzy Marcellino
Maurice "Muzzy" Marcellino[1] (November 27, 1912 – June 11, 1997) was an American singer and musician, known primarily for his clear, melodious style of whistling. Marcellino's whistling was featured in many television and film soundtracks, such as The Mickey Mouse Club
The Mickey Mouse Club
and Lassie. His contributions can also be heard on the soundtrack to the 1954 film The High and the Mighty and on Hugo Montenegro's 1968 hit version of the main theme to the film The Good, the Bad and the Ugly.[2] He was also the musical director of the CBS
CBS
daytime show, Art Linkletter's House Party. The Reader's Digest set of six records called Gaslight Musc Hall (1969) featured Marcellino whistling in the tune Whistling
Whistling
Rufus. Performed by the Gaslight Novelty Orchestra and conducted by Heinie Beau
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Ward Swingle
Ward Lamar Swingle (September 21, 1927 – January 19, 2015) was an American vocalist and jazz musician who founded The Swingle Singers
The Swingle Singers
in France
France
in 1962.Contents1 Life and career 2 See also 3 References 4 External linksLife and career[edit] Born in Mobile, Alabama, Swingle studied music, particularly jazz, from a very young age. He learned clarinet, oboe and the piano as a child. He was playing in Mobile-area Big Bands before finishing high school. Swingle continued his music studies at the Cincinnati Conservatory of Music, from which he graduated in 1950[1] (Summa Cum Laude)
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Scottsdale, Arizona
Scottsdale (O'odham: Vaṣai S-vaṣonĭ; Yaqui: Eskatel) is a city in the eastern part of Maricopa County, Arizona, part of the Greater Phoenix Area. Named Scottsdale in 1894 after founder Winfield Scott and incorporated in 1951 with a population of 2,000, the 2015 population of the city is estimated to be 236,839 according to the U.S. Census
Census
Bureau.[5] The New York Times
The New York Times
described downtown Scottsdale as "a desert version of Miami's South Beach" and as having "plenty of late night partying and a buzzing hotel scene."[6] Its slogan is "The West's Most Western Town."[7] Scottsdale, 31 miles long and 11.4 miles wide at its widest point, shares boundaries with many other municipalities and entities. On the west, Scottsdale is bordered by Phoenix, Paradise Valley and unincorporated Maricopa County
Maricopa County
land
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Phonofilm
Phonofilm
Phonofilm
is an optical sound-on-film system developed by inventors Lee de Forest
Lee de Forest
and Theodore Case
Theodore Case
in the 1920s.Contents1 Introduction 2 Premiere of Phonofilm 3 Development of Phonofilm 4 DeForest's use of Case patents 5 Producer Pat Powers attempts takeover of Phonofilm 6 Hollywood
Hollywood
chooses other sound systems 7 Phonofilm
Phonofilm
in the UK 8 Phonofilm
Phonofilm
in Australia 9 Phonofilm
Phonofilm
in Spain 10 Phonofilm
Phonofilm
in Latin America 11 Legacy of Phonofilm 12 List of films produced in Phonofilm 13 See also 14 References 15 External linksIntroduction[edit] In 1919 and 1920, Lee De Forest, inventor of the audion tube, filed his first patents on a sound-on-film process, DeForest Phonofilm, which recorded sound directly onto film as parallel lines
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Broadway Gondolier
Broadway Gondolier (1935) is a musical film directed by Lloyd Bacon. The film was released by Warner Bros., and featured Dick Powell, Joan Blondell and Adolphe Menjou.Contents1 Plot summary 2 Cast 3 References 4 External linksPlot summary[edit]This section needs expansion. You can help by adding to it. (August 2015)A taxi driver (Dick Powell) secretly works to achieve his dream of becoming a radio singer. One day he gives a radio station secretary a lift. She prattles on about a sponsor's new contest. The sponsor, a prominent cheese company, is looking for a singing gondolier to participate in their newest campaign.[1] Cast[edit] Dick Powell
Dick Powell
as Richard 'Dick' Purcell, aka Ricardo Purcelli Joan Blondell
Joan Blondell
as Alice Hughes Adolphe Menjou
Adolphe Menjou
as Professor Eduardo de Vinci Louise Fazenda
Louise Fazenda
as Mrs
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The Honeymooners
The Honeymooners
The Honeymooners
is an American television sitcom created by and starring Jackie Gleason, based on a recurring comedy sketch of the same name that had been part of his variety show. The sketches originally aired on the DuMont network's variety series Cavalcade of Stars, which Gleason hosted, and subsequently on the CBS network's The Jackie Gleason
Jackie Gleason
Show,[1] which was broadcast live in front of a theater audience. The popularity of the sketches led Gleason to rework The Honeymooners
The Honeymooners
as a filmed half-hour series, which debuted October 1, 1955, on CBS, in place of the variety series. It was initially a ratings success as the #2 show in the United States during its first season, facing stiff competition from The Perry Como Show on NBC.[2][3] The show eventually dropped to #19,[3][4] ending its production after only 39 episodes (now referred to as the "Classic 39")
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Art Carney
World War II -Battle of NormandyAwards Purple Heart MedalArthur William Matthew "Art" Carney (November 4, 1918 – November 9, 2003) was an American actor in film, stage, television and radio
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Anson Weeks
Anson Weeks (February 14, 1896, Oakland, California
Oakland, California
– February 7, 1969, Sacramento, California) was a pianist and the leader of a popular west coast dance band from the late 1920s through the 1960s, primarily in San Francisco. He made his first recording in Oakland on February 7, 1925, but it was not issued. He formed his first band in 1924 and had key hotel jobs in Oakland and Sacramento. By the late 1920s he led a popular regional orchestra and started recording for Columbia in 1928. He garnerered favorable attention in late 1931 on the "Lucky Strike Magic Carpet" radio program. His vocalists included Art Wilson, Harriet Lee, Donald Novis, Bob Crosby, Carl Ravazza, Kay St. Germaine, and Bob Gage. In 1932, he signed with Brunswick and recorded prolifically for them through 1935. During this time, his was one of Brunswick's premier bands and was nationally popular
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Isham Jones
Isham Edgar Jones (January 31, 1894 – October 19, 1956) was an American bandleader, saxophonist, bassist and songwriter.[1]Contents1 Career 2 Compositions 3 Number one hits 4 Discography 5 Honors 6 References 7 Bibliography 8 External linksCareer[edit] Jones was born in Coalton, Ohio, United States, to a musical and mining family, and grew up in Saginaw, Michigan, where he started his first band. In 1911 one of Jones's earliest compositions "On the Alamo" was published by Tell Taylor Inc. (Taylor had formed a publishing company the year before when his song "Down by the Old Mill Stream" became a hit.)[2] In 1915 Jones moved to Chicago, Illinois. He performed at the Green Mill Gardens, then began playing at Fred Mann's Rainbo Gardens.[3] Chicago
Chicago
remained his home until 1932, when he settled in New York City
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Jack Little (songwriter)
Little
Little
is a surname in the English language. The name is derived from the Middle English
Middle English
littel,[1] and the Old English
Old English
lȳtel, which mean "little".[2] In some cases the name was originally a nickname for a little man. In other cases, the name was used to distinguish the younger of two bearers of the same personal name.[1] Early records of the name include: Litle, in 972; Litle, in about 1095; and le Lytle, in 1296.[2] The surname has absorbed several non English-language surnames. For example, Little
Little
is sometimes a translation of the Irish Ó Beagáin, meaning "descendant of Beagán"
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Johnny Messner (musician)
Johnny Messner (October 13, 1909 in New York City
New York City
– January 1986 in Ridgefield Park, New Jersey) was an American bandleader, composer, saxophonist, and vocalist during the big band/swing heyday. Background[edit] Messner grew up in Ridgefield Park, New Jersey[1] and graduated from Ridgefield Park High School
Ridgefield Park High School
in 1928.[2][3] Messner, the youngest of five brothers, received a scholarship to study at the Juilliard School of Music. During World War II
World War II
he was drafted into the US Army, where he served as bandleader for ensembles at military training facilities across the United States. After the war ended, he joined Vincent Lopez's orchestra as an assistant bandleader and saxophonist. References[edit]^ Staff. "Messner Into Army", Billboard (magazine), February 12, 1944. Accessed November 15, 2017. "Johnny Messner, the master of Ridgefield Park, N. J
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Temptation (Nacio Herb Brown And Arthur Freed Song)
"Temptation" is a popular song published in 1933, with music written by Nacio Herb Brown and lyrics by Arthur Freed. The song was introduced by Bing Crosby in the 1933 film Going Hollywood. Crosby recorded the song with Lennie Hayton's orchestra on October 22, 1933[2] and it reached the No
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Let's Face The Music And Dance
"Let's Face the Music and Dance" is a song written in 1936 by Irving Berlin for the film Follow the Fleet, where it was introduced by Fred Astaire and featured in a celebrated dance duet with Astaire and Ginger Rogers. It is also used in Pennies from Heaven, where Astaire's voice is lip-synched by Steve Martin, and in a celebrated Morecambe and Wise sketch involving newsreader Angela Rippon.[1] [2] In 1997, it was used in a famous advert for Allied Dunbar. Barbra Streisand performed a line in her "Color Me Barbra Medley" from the TV special and album "Color Me Barbra"
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