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TDK
TDK
TDK
Corporation (TDK株式会社, TDK
TDK
Kabushiki-gaisha), formerly TDK Electronics
Electronics
Co., Ltd (東京電気化学工業株式会社), is a Japanese multinational electronics company that manufactures electronic materials, electronic components, and recording and data-storage media. Its motto is "Contribute to culture and industry through creativity".[2] "TDK" is an initialism of the original Japanese name of the company: Tokyo
Tokyo
Denkikagaku Kōgyō ( Tokyo
Tokyo
Electronics
Electronics
and Chemicals)
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One Times Square
One Times Square, also known as 1475 Broadway, the New York Times Building, the New York Times Tower, or simply as the Times Tower, is a 25-story, 363-foot-high (111 m) skyscraper, designed by Cyrus L. W. Eidlitz, located at 42nd Street and Broadway in New York City. The tower was originally built to serve as the headquarters of The New York Times, which officially moved into the tower in January 1905. Eight years later, the paper moved to a new building, 229 West 43rd Street. Even after the Times left, One Times Square remained a major focal point of Times Square due to its annual New Year's Eve "ball drop" festivities, and the introduction of an electronic news ticker at street-level in 1928. Following its sale to Lehman Brothers in 1995, One Times Square was re-purposed as an advertising location to take advantage of its prime location within the square
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Frankfurt
Frankfurt, officially Frankfurt
Frankfurt
am Main (German: [ˈfʁaŋkfʊɐ̯ t am ˈmaɪn] ( listen); lit. ' Frankfurt
Frankfurt
on the Main'), is a metropolis and the largest city in the German state of Hesse
Hesse
and the fifth-largest city in Germany. Frankfurt
Frankfurt
was a city state, the Free City of Frankfurt, for nearly five centuries, and was one of the most important cities of the Holy Roman Empire; it lost its sovereignty in 1866. In 2015, Frankfurt
Frankfurt
has a population of 732,688 within its administrative boundaries,[4] and 2.3 million in its urban area.[2][5] The city is at the centre of the larger Frankfurt Rhine-Main Metropolitan Region, which has a population of 5.5 million[1] and is Germany's second-largest metropolitan region after Rhine-Ruhr
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Multinational Corporation
A multinational corporation (MNC) or worldwide enterprise[5] is a corporate organization that owns or controls production of goods or services in at least one country other than its home country.[6] A multinational corporation can also be referred to as a multinational enterprise (MNE), a transnational enterprise (TNE), a transnational corporation (TNC), an international corporation, or a stateless corporation.[7] There are subtle but real differences between these three labels, as well as multinational corporation and worldwide enterprise. Multinational corporations are subject to criticisms for lacking ethical standards, and that this shows up in how they evade ethical laws and leverage their own business agenda with capital, and even the military backing of their own wealthy host nation-states.Contents1 Overview 2 Theoretical background 3 Transnational corporations 4 Multinational enterprise 5
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List Of Business Entities
A business entity is an entity that is formed and administered as per corporate law in order to engage in business activities, charitable work, or other activities allowable. Most often, business entities are formed to sell a product or a service. There are many types of business entities defined in the legal systems of various countries. These include corporations, cooperatives, partnerships, sole traders, limited liability company and other specifically permitted and labelled types of entities. The specific rules vary by country and by state or province
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Topix
Tokyo Stock Price Index (東証株価指数), commonly known as TOPIX, along with the Nikkei 225, is an important stock market index for the Tokyo Stock Exchange
Tokyo Stock Exchange
(TSE) in Japan, tracking all domestic companies of the exchange's First Section. It is calculated and published by the TSE. As of 1 February 2011[update], there are 1,669 companies listed on the First Section of the TSE, and the market value for the index was ¥197.4 trillion.[1] The index transitioned from a system where a company's weighting is based on the total number of shares outstanding to a weighting based on the number of shares available for trading (called the free float). This transition took place in three phases starting in October 2005 and was completed in June 2006
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Iron
Iron
Iron
is a chemical element with symbol Fe (from Latin: ferrum) and atomic number 26. It is a metal in the first transition series. It is by mass the most common element on Earth, forming much of Earth's outer and inner core. It is the fourth most common element in the Earth's crust. Its abundance in rocky planets like Earth
Earth
is due to its abundant production by fusion in high-mass stars, where it is the last element to be produced with release of energy before the violent collapse of a supernova, which scatters the iron into space. Like the other group 8 elements, ruthenium and osmium, iron exists in a wide range of oxidation states, −2 to +7, although +2 and +3 are the most common. Elemental iron occurs in meteoroids and other low oxygen environments, but is reactive to oxygen and water. Fresh iron surfaces appear lustrous silvery-gray, but oxidize in normal air to give hydrated iron oxides, commonly known as rust
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Videotape
Videotape
Videotape
is magnetic tape used for storing video and usually sound in addition. Information stored can be in the form of either an analog signal or digital signal. Videotape
Videotape
is used in both video tape recorders (VTRs) or, more commonly, videocassette recorders (VCRs) and camcorders. Videotapes are also used for storing scientific or medical data, such as the data produced by an electrocardiogram. Because video signals have a very high bandwidth, and stationary heads would require extremely high tape speeds, in most cases, a helical-scan video head rotates against the moving tape to record the data in two dimensions. Tape is a linear method of storing information and thus imposes delays to access a portion of the tape that is not already under the heads. The early 2000s saw the introduction and rise to prominence of high quality random-access video recording media such as hard disks and flash memory
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CD-R
CD-R
CD-R
(Compact Disc-Recordable) is a digital optical disc storage format. A CD-R
CD-R
disc is a compact disc that can be written once and read arbitrarily many times. CD-R
CD-R
discs (CD-Rs) are readable by most plain CD readers, i.e., CD readers manufactured prior to the introduction of CD-R. This is an advantage over CD-RW, which can be re-written but cannot be played on many plain CD readers.Contents1 History 2 Physical characteristics 3 Speed 4 Writing methods 5 Lifespan 6 Labeling 7 Disposal7.1 Data confidentiality 7.2 Recycling8 See also 9 References 10 External linksHistory[edit]Assorted CD-RsOriginally named CD Write-Once (WO), the CD-R
CD-R
specification was first published in 1988 by Philips
Philips
and Sony
Sony
in the 'Orange Book'
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DVD Recordable
DVD
DVD
recordable and DVD
DVD
rewritable refer to part of optical disc recording technologies. DVD
DVD
optical disc formats that can be recorded by a DVD
DVD
recorder, (written, "burned"), either write once or rewritable (write multiple times) format written by laser, as compared to DVD-ROM, which is mass-produced by pressing, primarily for the distribution of home video. DVD
DVD
recordable is a general term that refers to both write-once and rewritable formats, whereas DVD rewritable refers only to rewritable formats. Like CD-Rs, DVD
DVD
recordables use dyes. Depending on the intensity of the laser, the reflective property of the dye on a particular spot will determine whether it is a peak or a valley representation from pressed DVD. Dyes give the data side of a disc a distinct color. Dyes are also the reason playback is not guaranteed
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West Germany
50°44′02″N 7°05′59″E / 50.73389°N 7.09972°E / 50.73389; 7.09972Coordinates: 50°44′02″N 7°05′59″E / 50.73389°N 7.09972°E / 50.73389; 7.09972Languages GermanGovernment Federal parliamentary constitutional republicPresident •  1949–1959 Theodor Heuss •  1959–1969 Heinrich Lübke •  1969–1974 Gustav Heinemann •  1974–1979 Walter Scheel •  1979–1984 Karl Carstens •  1984–1990 Richard von WeizsäckerbChancellor •  1949–1963 Konrad Adenauer •  1963–1966 Ludwig Erhard •  1966–1969 Kurt Georg Kiesinger •  1969–1974 Willy Brandt •  1974–1982 Helmut Schmidt •  1982–1990 Helmut KohlcLegislature BundestagHistorical era Cold War •  Formation 23 May 19
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Asset
In financial accounting, an asset is an economic resource. Anything tangible or intangible that can be owned or controlled to produce value and that is held by a company to produce positive economic value is an asset. Simply stated, assets represent value of ownership that can be converted into cash (although cash itself is also considered an asset).[1] The balance sheet of a firm records the monetary[2] value of the assets owned by that firm. It covers money and other valuables belonging to an individual or to a business.[1] One can classify assets into two major asset classes: tangible assets and intangible assets. Tangible assets contain various subclasses, including current assets and fixed assets.[3] Current assets include inventory, while fixed assets include such items as buildings and equipment.[4] Intangible assets are nonphysical resources and rights that have a value to the firm because they give the firm some kind of advantage in the marketplace
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Brushless DC Electric Motor
Brushless DC electric motor
Brushless DC electric motor
(BLDC motors, BL motors) also known as electronically commutated motors (ECMs, EC motors), or synchronous DC motors, are synchronous motors powered by DC electricity via an inverter or switching power supply which produces an AC electric current to drive each phase of the motor via a closed loop controller. The controller provides pulses of current to the motor windings that control the speed and torque of the motor. The construction of a brushless motor system is typically similar to a permanent magnet synchronous motor (PMSM), but can also be a switched reluctance motor, or an induction (asynchronous) motor.[1] The advantages of a brushless motor over brushed motors are high power to weight ratio, high speed, and electronic control
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Magnetoresistance
Magnetoresistance
Magnetoresistance
is the tendency of a material to change the value of its electrical resistance in an externally-applied magnetic field. There are a variety of effects that can be called magnetoresistance: some occur in bulk non-magnetic metals and semiconductors, such as geometrical magnetoresistance, Shubnikov de Haas oscillations, or the common positive magnetoresistance in metals.[1] Other effects occur in magnetic metals, such as negative magnetoresistance in ferromagnets[2] or anisotropic magnetoresistance (AMR). Finally, in multicomponent or multilayer systems (e.g. magnetic tunnel junctions), giant magnetoresistance (GMR), tunnel magnetoresistance (TMR), colossal magnetoresistance (CMR), and extraordinary magnetoresistance (EMR) can be observed. The first magnetoresistive effect was discovered by William Thomson, better known as Lord Kelvin, in 1856, but he was unable to lower the electrical resistance of anything by more than 5%
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London
London
London
(/ˈlʌndən/ ( listen)) is the capital and most populous city of England
England
and the United Kingdom.[7][8] Standing on the River Thames
River Thames
in the south east of the island of Great Britain, London has been a major settlement for two millennia. It was founded by the Romans, who named it Londinium.[9] London's ancient core, the City of London, largely retains its 1.12-square-mile (2.9 km2) medieval boundaries
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Premier League
The Premier League
Premier League
is the top level of the English football league system. Contested by 20 clubs, it operates on a system of promotion and relegation with the English Football League
English Football League
(EFL). The Premier League
Premier League
is a corporation in which the member clubs act as shareholders. Seasons run from August to May with each team playing 38 matches (playing each other home and away).[1] Most games are played on Saturday and Sunday afternoons
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