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Taxonomy
Taxonomy is the practice and science of classification of things or concepts, including the principles that underlie such classification. Specific taxonomies include:Contents1 Natural sciences 2 Computing 3 Business and economics 4 Education and academia 5 Safety 6 Other taxonomies 7 See alsoNatural sciences[edit] Taxonomy (biology), a branch of science that encompasses the description, identification, nomenclature, and classification of organismsAlpha taxonomy, the description and basic classification of new species, subspecies, and other taxa
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Philosophical Language
A philosophical language is any constructed language that is constructed from first principles, like a logical language, but may entail a strong claim of absolute perfection or transcendent or even mystical truth rather than satisfaction of pragmatic goals. Philosophical languages were popular in Early Modern
Early Modern
times, partly motivated by the goal of recovering the lost Adamic or Divine language. The term ideal language is sometimes used near-synonymously, though more modern philosophical languages such as Toki Pona
Toki Pona
are less likely to involve such an exalted claim of perfection. It may be known as a language of pure ideology. The axioms and grammars of the languages together differ from commonly spoken languages today. In most older philosophical languages, and some newer ones, words are constructed from a limited set of morphemes that are treated as "elemental" or fundamental
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North American Industry Classification System
The North American Industry
Industry
Classification System or NAICS (pronounced "nakes"[1]) is used by business and government to classify business establishments according to type of economic activity (process of production) in Canada, Mexico, and the United States
United States
of America. It has largely replaced the older Standard Industrial Classification (SIC) system; however, certain government departments and agencies, such as the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission
U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission
(SEC), still use the SIC codes. An establishment is typically a single physical location, though administratively distinct operations at a single location may be treated as distinct establishments. Each establishment is classified to an industry according to the primary business activity taking place there
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992 album by Vesta Williams "Special" (Garbage song), 1998 "Special
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ACM Computing Classification System
The ACM Computing
Computing
Classification System (CCS) is a subject classification system for computing devised by the Association for Computing
Computing
Machinery (ACM). The system is comparable to the Mathematics Subject Classification (MSC) in scope, aims, and structure, being used by the various ACM journals to organise subjects by area.Contents1 History 2 Structure 3 See also 4 References 5 External linksHistory[edit] The system has gone through seven revisions, the first version being published in 1964, and revised versions appearing in 1982, 1983, 1987, 1991, 1998, and the now current version in 2012. Structure[edit] The ACM Computing
Computing
Classification System, version 2012, has a revolutionary change in some areas, for example, in "Software" that now is called "Software and its engineering" which has three main subjects:Software organization and properties
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Confidential Incident Reporting & Analysis System
The Confidential Incident Reporting & Analysis System (CIRAS) is a confidential safety reporting service for all workers in the United Kingdom rail industry. It operates under the oversight of the independent CIRAS Committee which is a unit of the Rail Safety and Standards Board (RSSB). Committee membership includes members from multiple interested parties: the British rail industry sectors (freight, infrastructure, Network Rail, passenger services, and LUL), the RSSB, the British rail unions, and individuals with special expertise from industry and academia. The service is funded by the rail industry, contractors, and all rail companies.[1][2]Contents1 History 2 Operation 3 Significance 4 See also 5 Sources 6 References 7 External linksHistory[edit] CIRAS was originally created in 1996 by a team from Strathclyde University. Other rail lines expressed interest in the project and several rail lines in Scotland voluntarily joined the system
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Swiss Cheese Model
The Swiss cheese
Swiss cheese
model of accident causation is a model used in risk analysis and risk management, including aviation safety, engineering, healthcare, emergency service organizations, and as the principle behind layered security, as used in computer security and defense in depth. It likens human systems to multiple slices of swiss cheese, stacked side by side, in which the risk of a threat becoming a reality is mitigated by the differing layers and types of defenses which are "layered" behind each other. Therefore, in theory, lapses and weaknesses in one defense do not allow a risk to materialize, since other defenses also exist, to prevent a single point of failure. The model was originally formally propounded by Dante Orlandella and James T. Reason of the University of Manchester,[1] and has since gained widespread acceptance
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International Standard Industrial Classification
The International Standard Industrial Classification of All Economic Activities is a United Nations
United Nations
industry classification system. Wide use has been made of ISIC in classifying data according to kind of economic activity in the fields of employment and health data.Contents1 Revision History 2 2008 classification 3 See also 4 References 5 External linksRevision History[edit] The United Nations
United Nations
Statistics Division has published the following revisions of the ISIC standard:Revision 1 - Published in 1958[1] Revision 2 - Published in 1968[2] Revision 3 - Published in 1989[3] Revision 3.1 - Published by the United Nations
United Nations
in 2002[4] Revision 4 - Published by the United Nations
United Nations
in 2008[5]2008 classification[edit]A. Agriculture, forestry and fishing B. Mining and quarrying C. Manufacturing D
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Mathematics Subject Classification
The Mathematics Subject Classification (MSC) is an alphanumerical classification scheme collaboratively produced by staff of, and based on the coverage of, the two major mathematical reviewing databases, Mathematical Reviews and Zentralblatt MATH. The MSC is used by many mathematics journals, which ask authors of research papers and expository articles to list subject codes from the Mathematics Subject Classification in their papers
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Global Industry Classification Standard
The Global Industry Classification Standard (GICS) is an industry taxonomy developed in 1999 by MSCI
MSCI
and Standard & Poor's (S&P) for use by the global financial community. The GICS structure consists of 11 sectors, 24 industry groups, 68 industries and 157 sub-industries[1] into which S&P has categorized all major public companies
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United Kingdom Standard Industrial Classification Of Economic Activities
The United Kingdom
United Kingdom
Standard Industrial Classification of Economic Activities, or UKSIC, is a Standard Industrial Classification that is intended to help classify businesses according to the type of their economic activity. One or more SIC codes can be attributed to a business. SIC codes identify what a business does. Over time there have been several different SIC systems used in the UK, with versions published in 1958, 1968, 1980, 1992, 1997, 2003 and 2007. These taxonomies have been adapted to cope with the changes in UK industry, The 1980 system was far more detailed in manufacturing, while the 2007 system is much stronger in the IT sector. Many companies still use the 2003 codes which were the 1992 system updated slightly
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Standard Industrial Classification
The Standard Industrial Classification SIC is a system for classifying industries by a four-digit code. Established in the United States
United States
in 1937, it is used by government agencies to classify industry areas. The SIC system is also used by agencies in other countries, e.g., by the United Kingdom's Companies House.[1] In the United States
United States
the SIC code is being supplanted by the six-digit North American Industry
Industry
Classification System (NAICS code), which was released in 1997; however certain government departments and agencies, such as the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission
U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission
(SEC), still use the SIC codes.[2] The SIC codes can be grouped into progressively broader industry classifications: industry group, major group, and division
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Nosology
Nosology (from Ancient Greek νόσος (nosos), meaning 'disease', and -λογία (-logia), meaning 'study of-') is a classification scheme used in medicine to classify diseases.Contents1 Types of classification 2 Coding systems 3 Extended nosology and general medical conditions 4 History 5 Applications 6 See also 7 References 8 External linksTypes of classification[edit] Diseases may be classified by cause, pathogenesis (mechanism by which the disease is caused), or by symptom(s). Alternatively, diseases may be classified according to the organ system involved, though this is often complicated since many diseases affect more than one organ. A chief difficulty in nosology is that diseases often cannot be defined and classified clearly, especially when cause or pathogenesis are unknown
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Soil Classification
Soil
Soil
classification deals with the systematic categorization of soils based on distinguishing characteristics as well as criteria that dictate choices in use.Contents1 Overview1.1 Engineering 1.2 Soil
Soil
science2 Soil
Soil
classifications for OSHA 3 See also 4 Further reading4.1 Current international system 4.2 Current national systems 4.3 Current technical systems 4.4 Earlier systems of historical interest 4.5 Principles 4.6 Numerical classification5 References 6 External linksOverview[edit] Soil
Soil
classification is a dynamic subject, from the structure of the system itself, to the definitions of classes, and finally in the application in the field
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Flynn's Taxonomy
Flynn's taxonomy
Flynn's taxonomy
is a classification of computer architectures, proposed by Michael J. Flynn
Michael J. Flynn
in 1966.[1][2] The classification system has stuck, and has been used as a tool in design of modern processors and their functionalities
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Industry Classification Benchmark
The Industry Classification Benchmark (ICB) is an industry classification taxonomy launched by Dow Jones and FTSE in 2005 and now owned solely by FTSE International. It is used to segregate markets into sectors within the macroeconomy. The ICB uses a system of 10 industries, partitioned into 19 supersectors, which are further divided into 41 sectors, which then contain 114 subsectors.[1][2] The ICB is used globally (though not universally) to divide the market into increasingly specific categories, allowing investors to compare industry trends between well-defined subsectors. The ICB replaced the legacy FTSE and Dow Jones classification systems on 3 January 2006, and is used today by the NASDAQ, NYSE and several other markets around the globe
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