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Target Books
Target Books was a British publishing imprint, established in 1973 by Universal-Tandem Publishing
Publishing
Co Ltd, a paperback publishing company. The imprint was established as a children's imprint to complement the adult Tandem imprint, and became well known for their highly successful range of novelisations and other assorted books based on the popular science-fiction television series Doctor Who. Their first publications based on the serial were reprints in paperback of three novels which had been previously published as hardbacks, 'Doctor Who and the Daleks', ' Doctor Who
Doctor Who
and the Crusaders' by David Whitaker, and ' Doctor Who
Doctor Who
and the Zarbi' by Bill Strutton. As these sold well further novelisations of the show were commissioned.[1] In 1975 Universal-Tandem was sold by its American owners, the Universal-Award group, to the British conglomerate Howard and Wyndham
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Parent Company
A parent company is a company that owns enough voting stock in another firm to control management and operation by doing and influencing or electing its board of directors
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Webcast
A webcast is a media presentation distributed over the Internet
Internet
using streaming media technology to distribute a single content source to many simultaneous listeners/viewers. A webcast may either be distributed live or on demand. Essentially, webcasting is "broadcasting" over the Internet. The largest "webcasters" include existing radio and TV stations, who "simulcast" their output through online TV or online radio streaming, as well as a multitude of Internet
Internet
only "stations". Webcasting usually consists of providing non-interactive linear streams or events
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Tim Dinsdale
Timothy Kay Dinsdale, ARAeS (1924 – 14 December 1987[1]) was famous as a seeker of the Loch Ness Monster. He attended King’s School, Worcester,[2] served in the Royal Air Force and worked as an aeronautical engineer. Determined to prove the existence of the Loch Ness Monster, Dinsdale traveled to Loch Ness on an expedition. On the fifth day, 23 April 1960, he filmed an object he would claim to be the hump of the monster. The grainy film is still believed by some to be proof of the existence of the monster. The Joint Air Reconnaissance Intelligence Centre (JARIC) analyzed it and believed it was an animate object, but later analyses suggest the footage is of a motorboat.[citation needed] Dinsdale dedicated his life to obtaining further evidence, taking part in a total of 56 expeditions, many of them solo. Although he claimed to have later seen the monster's head and neck on two occasions, he failed to obtain any more film footage
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Ray Harryhausen
Raymond Frederick Harryhausen (June 29, 1920 – May 7, 2013) was an American-British artist, designer, visual effects creator, writer and producer who created a form of stop-motion model animation known as "Dynamation".[2] His most memorable works include: working with his mentor Willis H. O'Brien on the animation for Mighty Joe Young (1949), his first color film, which won the Academy Award
Academy Award
for Best Visual Effects; The 7th Voyage of Sinbad (1958); and Jason and the Argonauts (1963), which featured a famous sword fight with seven skeleton warriors. His last film was Clash of the Titans (1981), after which he retired. Harryhausen moved to the United Kingdom, became a dual US-UK citizen and lived in London
London
from 1960 until his death in 2013
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Sinbad And The Eye Of The Tiger
Sinbad
Sinbad
and the Eye of the Tiger is a 1977 fantasy film directed by Sam Wanamaker and featuring stop motion effects by Ray Harryhausen. The film stars Patrick Wayne, Taryn Power, Margaret Whiting, Jane Seymour, and Patrick Troughton. It is the third and final Sinbad
Sinbad
film released by Columbia Pictures.Contents1 Plot 2 Cast 3 Production 4 Home media 5 Critical reception 6 References 7 External linksPlot[edit] In the kingdom of Charak, a celebration is taking place for the coronation of Prince Kassim (Damien Thomas). But Kassim's evil stepmother, Zenobia (Margaret Whiting), places a curse on him and turns Kassim into a baboon (one of Harryhausen's stop motion creations) just as he was going to be crowned caliph. Sinbad
Sinbad
(Patrick Wayne), sailor and Prince of Baghdad, moors at Charak, intent on seeking permission from Prince Kassim to marry Kassim's sister, Princess Farah (Jane Seymour)
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Downtime (Doctor Who)
Downtime is a direct-to-video spin-off of the long-running British science fiction television series Doctor Who. It was released direct-to-video and produced by the independent production company Reeltime Pictures. It is a sequel to the Second Doctor
Second Doctor
serials The Abominable Snowmen and The Web of Fear. Downtime stars Nicholas Courtney, Deborah Watling, Jack Watling and Elisabeth Sladen
Elisabeth Sladen
reprising their roles as Brigadier Lethbridge-Stewart, Victoria Waterfield, Professor Edward Travers and Sarah Jane Smith, respectively
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Shakedown
Shakedown may refer to: Shakedown (continuum mechanics), a type of plastic deformation Shakedown (testing)
Shakedown (testing)
or a shakedown cruise, a period of
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BBC Books
A book is a series of pages assembled for easy portability and reading, as well as the composition contained in it. The book's most common modern form is that of a codex volume consisting of rectangular paper pages bound on one side, with a heavier cover and spine, so that it can fan open for reading. Books have taken other forms, such as scrolls, leaves on a string, or strips tied together; and the pages have been of parchment, vellum, papyrus, bamboo slips, palm leaves, silk, wood, and other materials.[1] The contents of books are also called books, as are other compositions of that length. For instance, Aristotle's Physics, the constituent sections of the Bible, and even the Egyptian Book of the Dead
Book of the Dead
are called books independently of their physical form. Conversely, some long literary compositions are divided into books of varying sizes, which typically do not correspond to physically bound units
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Scream Of The Shalka
Scream of the Shalka
Scream of the Shalka
is a Flash-animated series based on the British science fiction television series Doctor Who. It was produced to coincide with the 40th Anniversary of the series and was originally posted in six weekly parts from 13 November to 18 December 2003 on bbc.co.uk's Doctor Who
Doctor Who
website.[1] Although Scream of the Shalka
Scream of the Shalka
continues the narrative of the original 1963–89 programme and the 1996 television film, the show's 2005 revival ignored its events.[2] The series was scripted by veteran Doctor Who
Doctor Who
writer Paul Cornell, with Richard E. Grant
Richard E. Grant
providing the voice for the Ninth Doctor
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Terry Nation
9 March 1997(1997-03-09) (aged 66) Los Angeles, California, United StatesCause of death EmphysemaOccupation Television writerGenre Science fiction, comedy, horrorNotable works Creating the Daleks for Doctor Who, as well as the TV series Survivors and Blake's 7Spouse Kate NationChildren 2, Rebecca and JoelTerence Joseph "Terry" Nation (8 August 1930 – 9 March 1997)[1] was a Welsh television writer and novelist. Nation first made his name as a comedy writer before becoming a prolific writer for drama, working on many of the most popular British series of the 1960s and 1970s
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Random House
Random House is an American book publisher and the largest general-interest paperback publisher in the world.[1][2][3] As of 2013, it is part of Penguin Random House, which is jointly owned by German media conglomerate Bertelsmann
Bertelsmann
and British global education and publishing company Pearson PLC.Contents1 History1.1 Early history 1.2 Acquisition by Bertelsmann 1.3 Merger with Penguin2 Organization2.1 Headquarters 2.2 Imprints 2.3 International branches3 See also 4 References 5 External linksHistory[edit] Early history[edit] Random House was founded in 1925 by Americans Bennett Cerf
Bennett Cerf
and Donald Klopfer, two years after they acquired the Modern Library imprint from publisher Horace Liveright, which reprints classic works of literature
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Ebury Publishing
Ebury Publishing is a division of Penguin Random House, and is a well-known publisher of general non-fiction books in the UK. Ebury was founded in 1961 as a division of Nat Mags. It was sold to Century Hutchinson in 1989; Century Hutchinson was promptly acquired by Random House.[1][2] Random House merged with Penguin Group
Penguin Group
to form Penguin Random House in 2015. Under its umbrella are the imprints BBC Books, Ebury Press, Rider, Time Out, Virgin Books and Vermilion—each with their own, distinct identity and specialist areas of publishing. References[edit]^ "History of the Random House Imprints". Retrieved 2018-01-20.  ^ McDOWELL, EDWIN (1987-05-08). " Random House to Buy British Group". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331
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David J. Howe
David J. Howe
David J. Howe
is a British writer, journalist, publisher, and media historian.Contents1 Biography 2 Selected bibliography 3 References 4 External linksBiography[edit] David Howe was born 24 August 1961 and established himself (in the early 1980s) as an authoritative media historian through writing articles for fanzines (notably The Frame) and other publications
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The Bookseller
The Bookseller
The Bookseller
is a British magazine reporting news on the publishing industry. Philip Jones is editor-in-chief of the weekly print edition of the magazine and the website.[1] The magazine is home to the Bookseller/Diagram Prize for Oddest Title of the Year, a humorous award given annually to the book with the oddest title. The award is organised by The Bookseller's diarist, Horace Bent, and had been administered in recent years by the former deputy editor, Joel Rickett, and former charts editor, Philip Stone. We Love This Book
We Love This Book
is its quarterly sister consumer website and email newsletter. The subscription-only magazine is read by around 30,000 persons each week, in over 90 countries, and contains the latest news from the publishing and bookselling worlds, in-depth analysis, pre-publication book previews and author interviews. It is the first publication to publish official weekly bestseller lists in the UK
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Radio Times
Radio Times
Radio Times
is a British weekly television and radio programme listings magazine. It was the world's first broadcast listings magazine[2] when it was founded in 1923 by John Reith, then general manager of the BBC
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