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Tao Hongjing
Tao Hongjing
Tao Hongjing
(456-536), courtesy name Tongming, was a polymath Chinese author, scholar, calligrapher, waidan alchemist, pharmacologist, and astronomer during the Northern and Southern dynasties
Northern and Southern dynasties
(420-589). He is best known as a founder of the Shangqing "Highest Clarity" school of Daoism
Daoism
and the compiler-editor of the basic Shangqing religious texts.Contents1 Biography1.1 Secular life 1.2 Reclusion on Maoshan 1.3 Names2 Literary works 3 Religion3.1 Buddhism 3.2 Daoism4 Protoscience4.1 Pharmacology 4.2 External alchemy5 References 6 External linksBiography[edit] There are a variety of sources about Tao Hongjing's life, from his own writings to biographies in the official Twenty-Four Histories
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Chinese Name
Chinese personal names are names used by those from mainland China, Hong Kong, Macau, Taiwan, and the Chinese diaspora
Chinese diaspora
overseas. Due to China's historical dominance of East Asian culture, many names used in Korea and Vietnam are adaptations of Chinese names, or have historical roots in Chinese, with appropriate adaptation to accommodate linguistic differences. Modern Chinese names consist of a surname known as xing (姓, xìng), which comes first and is usually but not always monosyllabic, followed by a personal name called ming (名, míng), which is nearly always mono- or disyllabic
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Jintan District
Jintan District is a district under the administration of Changzhou in the Jiangsu province of the People's Republic of China.Contents1 History 2 Location 3 Dialect 4 Environment4.1 Geography and geomorphology 4.2 Lakes and Rivers 4.3 Climate5 Economy 6 References 7 External linksHistory[edit] Jintan, known as Jinshan (金山) in ancient times, was a township of Yanling commandery since the reign of the Emperor Yuan of Jin. Then it was promoted by its inhabitants as Jinshan county to strengthen the local vigilance in the end of the Sui, without permission. So the Tang government restored that soon. As a densely populated area, the county was reestablished in about 688, but since there was a namesake in present-day Jinhua of Zhejiang, it was named after Jintan, also a hill of Mountain Mao.[1][2] Location[edit] On November 10, 1993, Jintan was reclassified from a county and officially became a city
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Liu Song Dynasty
 MyanmarHistory of ChinaANCIENTNeolithic c. 8500 – c. 2070 BCE Xia dynasty
Xia dynasty
c. 2070 – c. 1600 BCE Shang dynasty
Shang dynasty
c. 1600 – c. 1046 BCE Zhou dynasty
Zhou dynasty
c
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Southern Qi
The Southern Qi
Southern Qi
(simplified Chinese: 南齐; traditional Chinese: 南齊; pinyin: Nán Qí) (479-502) was the second of the Southern dynasties in China, followed by the Liang Dynasty. During its 23-year history, the dynasty was largely filled with instability, as after the death of the capable Emperor Gao and Emperor Wu, Emperor Wu's grandson Xiao Zhaoye was assassinated by Emperor Wu's intelligent but cruel and suspicious cousin Xiao Luan, who took over as Emperor Ming, and proceeded to carry out massive executions of Emperor Gao's and Emperor Wu's sons and grandsons, as well as officials that he suspected of plotting against him
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Liang Dynasty
The Liang dynasty
Liang dynasty
(Chinese: 梁朝; pinyin: Liáng cháo) (502–557), also known as the Southern Liang dynasty
Liang dynasty
(南梁), was the third of the Southern Dynasties during China's Southern and Northern Dynasties period. It was located in East China
China
and South China, and replaced by the Chen dynasty
Chen dynasty
in 557
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Emperor Gao Of Southern Qi
Emperor Gao of Southern Qi
Southern Qi
((南)齊高帝; 427–482), personal name Xiao Daocheng (蕭道成), courtesy name Shaobo (紹伯), nickname Doujiang (鬥將)) was the founding emperor of the Chinese dynasty Southern Qi. He served as a general under the preceding dynasty Liu Song's Emperor Ming and Emperor Houfei. In 477, fearful that the young, cruel Emperor Houfei would kill him, assassinated Emperor Houfei and seized power, eventually taking the throne in 479 to start Southern Qi.Contents1 Background 2 Under Emperor Ming of Liu Song 3 Under Emperor Houfei of Liu Song 4 Under Emperor Shun of Liu Song 5 Reign 6 Era name 7 Personal information 8 ReferencesBackground[edit] Xiao Daocheng was born in 427. His ancestors traced their line to the famed Han Dynasty
Dynasty
prime minister Xiao He. If their records were accurate, Xiao Daocheng was Xiao He's 24-generation descendant
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Filial Mourning
Filial mourning (simplified Chinese: 丁忧; traditional Chinese: 丁憂; pinyin: dīngyōu) refers to a bureaucratic norm, practiced since the Han dynasty, whereby officials of the imperial government of China were obliged to resign their posts and return to their home upon the death of a parent or grandparent. Description[edit] The meaning of the phrase literally means 'to encounter worries/loss', i.e. bereavement. Once used to refer to all forms of mourning for one's parents, it evolved in meaning to refer only to the practice of officials resigning their posts for mourning. The roots of the practice lie in the Confucianist
Confucianist
focus on filial piety as a key virtue of government, and thus was instituted during the Western Han dynasty, when Confucianism first became the official ideology of the empire. During the mourning period, banqueting, marriage, official activities and participation in the Imperial Examinations are all proscribed
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Emperor Wu Of Southern Qi
Emperor
Emperor
Wu of Southern Qi
Southern Qi
((南)齊武帝) (440–493), personal name Xiao Ze (蕭賾), courtesy name Xuanyuan (宣遠), nickname Long'er (龍兒), was the second emperor of the Chinese Southern Qi
Southern Qi
Dynasty. He was considered to be an able and diligent emperor, although he was also criticized for wastefulness.Contents1 Background 2 As crown prince 3 Early reign 4 Late reign 5 Era name 6 Personal information 7 See also 8 NotesBackground[edit]A winged lion from the mausoleum of Qi Wudi near NanjingXiao Ze was born in the Liu Song
Liu Song
capital Jiankang
Jiankang
in 440, when his father Xiao Daocheng was just 13 years old
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Lingbao School
The Lingbao School
Lingbao School
(Simplified Chinese: 灵宝派; Traditional Chinese: 靈寶派; pinyin: Líng Bǎo Pài), also known as the School of the Sacred Jewel or the School of Numinous Treasure, was an important Daoist school that emerged in China
China
in between the Jin Dynasty and the Liu Song Dynasty
Liu Song Dynasty
in the early fifth century CE. It lasted for about two hundred years until it was absorbed into the Shangqing and Zhengyi currents during the Tang Dynasty. The Lingbao School is a synthesis of religious ideas based on Shangqing texts, the rituals of the Celestial Masters, and Buddhist practices. The Lingbao School
Lingbao School
borrowed many concepts from Buddhism, including the concept of reincarnation, and also some cosmological elements. Although reincarnation was an important concept in the Lingbao School, the earlier Daoist belief in attaining immortality remained
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Fulu
Fulu
Fulu
(Chinese: 符籙) is a term for Daoist practitioners in the past who could draw and write supernatural talismans, Fu (Chinese: 符), Shenfu (Chinese: 神符) which they believed functioned as summons or instructions to deities, spirits, or as tools of exorcism, as medicinal potions for ailments. It is believed by Taoists that in the past the ability to write Shenfu had been once decreed by their deities to authorized priests or daoshi. Lu (Chinese: 籙) is a register and compilation of the membership of the daoshi as well as the skills they were able to use
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Vision (spirituality)
A vision is something seen in a dream, trance, or religious ecstasy, especially a supernatural appearance that usually conveys a revelation.[1] Visions generally have more clarity than dreams, but traditionally fewer psychological connotations. Visions are known to emerge from spiritual traditions and could provide a lens into human nature and reality.[2] Prophecy
Prophecy
is often associated with visions. In simple words, it is a religious experience in which the experience can be seen and hence it is called a vision.Contents1 Examples 2 See also 3 References 4 External linksExamples[edit]This section does not cite any sources. Please help improve this section by adding citations to reliable sources. Unsourced material may be challenged and removed
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Grotto-heavens
Grotto-heavens
Grotto-heavens
(Chinese: 洞天; pinyin: Dòngtian) are a type of sacred Taoist site. Grotto-heavens
Grotto-heavens
are usually caves, grottoes, mountain hollows, or other underground or semi-underground spaces. Because every community was supposed to have access to at least one grotto, there were many of them all over China. They were first organized systematically in the Tang Dynasty
Tang Dynasty
by Sima Chengzhen 司馬承禎 (647–735, see Zuowanglun) and Du Guangting 杜光庭 (850-933).[1] The most sacred of these sites were divided into two types: The ten greater grotto-heavens and the thirty-six lesser grotto-heavens.[2] The ten greater grotto-heavens are as follows:Mt. Wangwu grotto 王屋山 (Henan) Mt. Weiyu grotto 委羽山 (Zhejiang) Mt. Xicheng grotto 西城山 (Shanxi) Mt. Xixuan grotto 西玄山 (Sichuan) Mt
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Chinese Buddhism
Chinese Buddhism
Buddhism
or Han Buddhism
Buddhism
has shaped Chinese culture in a wide variety of areas including art, politics, literature, philosophy, medicine, and material culture. The translation of a large body of Indian Buddhist scriptures into Chinese and the inclusion of these translations together with works composed in China
China
into a printed canon had far-reaching implications for the dissemination of Buddhism
Buddhism
throughout the Chinese cultural sphere, including Korea, Japan, Ryukyu Islands
Ryukyu Islands
and Vietnam
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Lake Tai
Lake
Lake
Tai or Lake
Lake
Taihu (Chinese: 太湖, p Tài Hú, Wu: Ta Wu, lit. "Great Lake") is a large freshwater lake in the Yangtze Delta plain in Wuxi, China. The lake belongs to Jiangsu
Jiangsu
and the southern shore forms its border with Zhejiang. With an area of 2,250 square kilometers (869 sq mi) and an average depth of 2 meters (6.6 ft),[1] it is the third-largest freshwater lake in China, after Poyang and Dongting. The lake houses about 90 islands, ranging in size from a few square meters to several square kilometers. Lake
Lake
Tai is linked to the renowned Grand Canal and is the origin of a number of rivers, including Suzhou
Suzhou
Creek
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Zhejiang
 Zhejiang (help·info), formerly romanized as Chekiang, is an eastern coastal province of China. Zhejiang
Zhejiang
is bordered by Jiangsu and Shanghai
Shanghai
to the north, Anhui
Anhui
to the northwest, Jiangxi
Jiangxi
to the west, and Fujian
Fujian
to the south
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