HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Tangiers
Tangier
Tangier
(/tænˈdʒɪər/; Arabic: طَنجة‎ Ṭanjah; Berber: ⵟⴰⵏⴵⴰ Ṭanja; old Berber name: ⵜⵉⵏⴳⵉ Tingi; adapted to Latin: Tingis; French: Tanger; Spanish: Tánger; also called Tangiers in English) is a major city in northwestern Morocco. It is located on the Maghreb
Maghreb
coast at the western entrance to the Strait of Gibraltar, where the Mediterranean Sea
Mediterranean Sea
meets the Atlantic Ocean off Cape Spartel. The town is the capital of the Tanger-Tetouan-Al Hoceima
Tanger-Tetouan-Al Hoceima
region, as well as the Tangier-Assilah prefecture of Morocco. Many civilisations and cultures have impacted the history of Tangier starting from before the 5th century BC
[...More...]

"Tangiers" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Berbers
Berbers
Berbers
or Amazighs (Berber languages: ⵉⵎⴰⵣⵉⵖⵏ Imaziɣen; singular: ⴰⵎⴰⵣⵉⵖ Amaziɣ / Amazigh) are an ethnic group indigenous to North Africa, primarily inhabiting the Maghreb. They are distributed in an area stretching from the Atlantic Ocean to the Siwa Oasis
Siwa Oasis
in Egypt, and from the Mediterranean Sea
Mediterranean Sea
to the Niger
Niger
River in West Africa. Historically, they spoke Berber languages, which together form the Berber branch of the Afroasiatic family. Since the Muslim conquest
Muslim conquest
of North Africa
North Africa
in the seventh century, a large number of Berbers
Berbers
inhabiting the Maghreb
Maghreb
(Tamazgha) have in varying degrees used as lingua franca the other languages spoken in North Africa
[...More...]

"Berbers" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Antaios
Antaeus
Antaeus
(/ænˈtiːəs/, Greek: Ἀνταῖος, Antaîos, lit. "Opponent”, derived from ἀντάω, antao - I face, I oppose); Berber languages: Änti) was a figure in Greek and Berber mythology. In Greek sources, he was the half-giant son of Poseidon
Poseidon
and Gaia.[1][2] His wife was the goddess Tinge, and he had a daughter named Alceis or Barce
[...More...]

"Antaios" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

Tanger (other)
Tanger is the French spelling of Tangier, a city in Morocco. It may also refer to: People[edit] Helen Tanger
Helen Tanger
(born 1978), Dutch Olympic rower Stanley Tanger (1923–2010), U.S. businessman and philanthropistPlaces[edit]Louise Arnold Tanger Arboretum, U.S. arboretum in Lancaster, Pennsylvania Tanger Family Bicentennial Garden, U.S. public garden in Greensboro, North Carolina Tanger-Med, Moroccan cargo port Tanger Outlets The Walk, U.S. open-air mall in Atlantic City, New Jersey Tanger (river), German tributary to the ElbeOther[edit]Atletico Tanger, Moroccan football club IR Tanger, Moroccan football club Steven Tanger Center for the Performing Arts in Greensboro, North Carolina, USA Tanger Factory Outlet Centers, U.S
[...More...]

"Tanger (other)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Phoenicia
Coordinates: 34°07′25″N 35°39′04″E / 34.12361°N 35.65111°E / 34.12361; 35.65111Phoeniciaknʿn / kanaʿan  (Phoenician) Φοινίκη / Phoiníkē  (Greek)1500 BC[1]–539 BCMap of Phoenicia
Phoenicia
and its Mediterranean trade routesCapital Not specifiedLanguages Phoenician, PunicReligion Canaanite religionGovernment City-states ruled by kingsWell-known kings of Phoenician cities •  c. 1000 BC Ahiram •  969 – 936 BC Hiram I 
[...More...]

"Phoenicia" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

International City
An international city is an autonomous or semi-autonomous city-state that is separate from the direct supervision of any single nation-state.Contents1 Rationale for establishment 2 Instruments of state and governance 3 Status of Jerusalem 4 Examples 5 Similar concepts 6 References 7 See alsoRationale for establishment[edit] International cities had either one or both of the following characteristics:they were ethnically mixed; authority over the city had previously been contested by different nation-states.International cities were established mainly in the 1920s and 1940s, following World War I
[...More...]

"International City" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Colonialism
Colonialism
Colonialism
is the policy of a nation seeking to extend or retain its authority over other people or territories, generally with the aim of developing or exploiting them to the benefit of the colonizing country and helping the colonies modernize in terms defined by the colonizers, especially in economics, religion and health. The European colonial period was the era from the 15th century to 1914 when Spain, Portugal, Britain, Russia, France, the Netherlands, Germany, and several smaller European countries such a Belgium and Italy, established colonies outside Europe.[1] It has been estimated that by 1914, Europeans had gained control of 84% of the globe, and by 1800, before the Industrial Revolution
Industrial Revolution
had taken hold, they already controlled at least 35% (excluding Antarctica).[2] The system practically ended between 1945–1975 when nearly all colonies became independent
[...More...]

"Colonialism" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

Titular See
A titular see in various churches is an episcopal see of a former diocese that no longer functions, sometimes called a "dead diocese". The ordinary or hierarch of such a see may be styled a "titular metropolitan" (highest rank), "titular archbishop" (intermediary rank) or "titular bishop" (lowest rank), which normally goes by the status conferred on the titular see. The term is used to signify a diocese that no longer functionally exists, often because the diocese once flourished but the territory was conquered by Muslims or no longer functions because of a schism. The Greek–Turkish population exchange of 1923 also contributed to titular bishoprics. The see of Maximianoupolis was destroyed along with the town that shared its name by the Bulgarians under Emperor Kaloyan in 1207; the town and the see were under the control of the Latin Empire, which took Constantinople during the Fourth Crusade
Fourth Crusade
in 1204
[...More...]

"Titular See" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Atlas (mythology)
In Greek mythology, Atlas
Atlas
(/ˈætləs/; Ancient Greek: Ἄτλας) was a Titan condemned to hold up the sky for eternity after the Titanomachy
[...More...]

"Atlas (mythology)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Umayyad Caliphate
The Umayyad Caliphate
Caliphate
(Arabic: ٱلْخِلافَةُ ٱلأُمَوِيَّة‎, trans. Al-Khilāfatu al-ʾUmawiyyah), also spelt Omayyad,[2] was the second of the four major caliphates established after the death of Muhammad. The caliphate was ruled by the Umayyad dynasty
Umayyad dynasty
(Arabic: ٱلأُمَوِيُّون‎, al-ʾUmawiyyūn, or بَنُو أُمَيَّة, Banū ʾUmayya, "Sons of Umayya"), hailing from Mecca. An Umayyad clan member had previously come to power as the third Rashidun
Rashidun
Caliph, Uthman ibn Affan
Uthman ibn Affan
(r. 644–656), but official Umayyad rule was established by Muawiya ibn Abi Sufyan, long-time governor of Syria, after the end of the First Muslim Civil War in AD 661
[...More...]

"Umayyad Caliphate" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Carthage
Carthage
Carthage
(/ˈkɑːrθɪdʒ/, from Latin: Carthago; Phoenician: Qart-ḥadašt ("New city")) was the center or capital city of the ancient Carthaginian civilization, on the eastern side of the Lake of Tunis
Tunis
in what is now the Tunis Governorate
Tunis Governorate
in Tunisia. The city developed from a Phoenician colony into the capital of an empire dominating the Mediterranean during the first millennium BC.[1] The legendary Queen Dido
Dido
is regarded as the founder of the city, though her historicity has been questioned. According to accounts by Timaeus of Tauromenium, she purchased from a local tribe the amount of land that could be covered by an oxhide
[...More...]

"Carthage" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Syphax
Syphax
Syphax
was a king of the ancient Numidian tribe Masaesyli of western Numidia
Numidia
during the last quarter of the 3rd century BC. His story is told in Livy's Ab Urbe Condita (written c. 27–25 BC).[1] Biography[edit]Tomb of Syphax
Syphax
in Batna (Algeria)When in 218 BC, war broke out between Carthage and Rome, Syphax
Syphax
was initially sympathetic to the Romans. In 213 BC, he concluded an alliance with the Romans and they sent military advisers to help Syphax
Syphax
train his troops. He then attacked the eastern Numidians, the Massylians, ruled by King Gala; at that time allied to the Carthaginians
[...More...]

"Syphax" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Cape Spartel
Cape Spartel (Arabic: رأس سبارطيل‎) is a promontory in Morocco
Morocco
about 1,000 feet (300 m) above sea level at the entrance to the Strait of Gibraltar, 12 km West of Tangier. Below the cape are the Caves of Hercules.Contents1 Description 2 Historical events 3 See also 4 References 5 BibliographyDescription[edit]Caves of Hercules.Cape Spartel is frequently but incorrectly referred to as the northernmost point of Africa, which is instead Ras ben Sakka, Tunisia. It is the most North Western point of mainland Africa. The cape rises to a height of 326 m. at the top of Jebel Quebir where there is a tower. There is another tower nearer to the end of the cape which serves as a lighthouse.[1] Below the cape are the Caves of Hercules. These are open to the public and they are accessible from Robinson Plage. The caves have shown evidence of neolithic occupation
[...More...]

"Cape Spartel" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Hercules
Hercules
Hercules
(/ˈhɜːrkjəliːz/) is a Roman hero and god. He was the equivalent of the Greek divine hero Heracles, who was the son of Zeus (Roman equivalent Jupiter) and the mortal Alcmene. In classical mythology, Hercules
Hercules
is famous for his strength and for his numerous far-ranging adventures. The Romans adapted the Greek hero's iconography and myths for their literature and art under the name Hercules. In later Western art
Western art
and literature and in popular culture, Hercules
Hercules
is more commonly used than Heracles
Heracles
as the name of the hero
[...More...]

"Hercules" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Caves Of Hercules
The Caves of Hercules
Hercules
is an archaeological cave complex located in Cape Spartel, Morocco. Situated 14 kilometres (9 mi) west of Tangier, the popular tourist attract is adjacent to the summer palace of the King of Morocco. The cave has two openings, one to sea and one to land. The sea opening is known as "The Map of Africa". It is believed that the Phoenicians created the sea opening which is in the shape of Africa when looked at from the sea. There are also some markings on the wall in the shape of eyes, that are said to be made by the Phoenicians, which make up a map of the local area. The cave itself is part natural and part man-made
[...More...]

"Caves Of Hercules" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Labours Of Hercules
The Twelve Labours of Heracles
Heracles
or of Hercules
Hercules
(Greek: οἱ Ἡρακλέους ἆθλοι, hoi Hērakleous athloi)[1][2] are a series of episodes concerning a penance carried out by Heracles, the greatest of the Greek heroes, whose name was later Romanised as Hercules. They were accomplished over 12 years at the service of King Eurystheus. The episodes were later connected by a continuous narrative. The establishment of a fixed cycle of twelve labours was attributed by the Greeks to an epic poem, now lost, written by Peisander, dated about 600 BC.[3] After Hercules
Hercules
killed his wife and children, he went to the oracle at Delphi. He prayed to the god Apollo for guidance. Hercules
Hercules
was told to serve the king of Mycenae, Eurystheus, for 12 years
[...More...]

"Labours Of Hercules" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse
.