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Tang Dynasty Tomb Figures
Tang dynasty
Tang dynasty
tomb figures are pottery figures of people and animals made in the Tang dynasty
Tang dynasty
of China (618–906) as grave goods to be placed in tombs. There was a belief that the figures represented would become available for the service of the deceased in the afterlife.[1] The figures are made of moulded earthenware with colour generally being added, though often not over the whole figure, or in naturalistic places. Where the colouring was in paint it has often not survived, but in many cases it was in sancai ("three-colour") ceramic glaze, which has generally lasted well. The figures, called mingqui in Chinese, were most often of servants, soldiers (in male tombs) and attendants such as dancers and musicians, with many no doubt representing courtesans. In burials of people of high rank there may be soldiers and officials as well
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Luoyang
Luoyang, formerly romanized as Loyang, is a city located in the confluence area of Luo River and Yellow River
Yellow River
in Central China. It is a prefecture-level city in western Henan
Henan
province. It borders the provincial capital of Zhengzhou
Zhengzhou
to the east, Pingdingshan
Pingdingshan
to the southeast, Nanyang to the south, Sanmenxia
Sanmenxia
to the west, Jiyuan
Jiyuan
to the north, and Jiaozuo
Jiaozuo
to the northeast
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Cobalt
Cobalt
Cobalt
is a chemical element with symbol Co and atomic number 27. Like nickel, cobalt is found in the Earth's crust only in chemically combined form, save for small deposits found in alloys of natural meteoric iron. The free element, produced by reductive smelting, is a hard, lustrous, silver-gray metal. Cobalt-based blue pigments (cobalt blue) have been used since ancient times for jewelry and paints, and to impart a distinctive blue tint to glass, but the color was later thought by alchemists to be due to the known metal bismuth. Miners had long used the name kobold ore (German for goblin ore) for some of the blue-pigment producing minerals; they were so named because they were poor in known metals, and gave poisonous arsenic-containing fumes when smelted
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Slip-painting
Slipware is pottery identified by its primary decorating process where slip is placed onto the leather-hard clay body surface before firing by dipping, painting or splashing. Slip is an aqueous suspension of a clay body, which is a mixture of clays and other minerals such as quartz, feldspar and mica
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Contrapposto
Contrapposto
Contrapposto
(Italian pronunciation: [kontrapˈposto]) is an Italian term that means counterpoise. It is used in the visual arts to describe a human figure standing with most of its weight on one foot so that its shoulders and arms twist off-axis from the hips and legs. This gives the figure a more dynamic, or alternatively relaxed appearance. It can also be used to refer to multiple figures which are in counter-pose (or opposite pose) to one another. It can further encompass the tension as a figure changes from resting on a given leg to walking or running upon it (so-called ponderation)
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Dvarapala
A Dvarapala
Dvarapala
(Sanskrit, "door guard"; IAST: Dvārapāla Sanskrit pronunciation: [dʋaːɽəpaːlə]) is a door or gate guardian often portrayed as a warrior or fearsome giant, usually armed with a weapon - the most common being the gada (mace). The dvarapala statue is a widespread architectural element throughout Hindu and Buddhist cultures, as well as in areas influenced by them like Java.Contents1 Names 2 Origin and forms 3 Gallery 4 See also 5 References 6 External linksNames[edit] In most southeast Asian languages (including Thai, Burmese, Vietnamese, Khmer and Javanese), these protective figures are referred to as dvarapala. Sanskrit
Sanskrit
dvāra means "gate" or "door", and pāla means "guard" or "protector". The related name in Indonesian and Malaysia is dwarapala
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Daoist
Taoism
Taoism
(/ˈtaʊɪzəm/, also US: /ˈdaʊ-/), also known as Daoism, is a religious or philosophical tradition of Chinese origin which emphasizes living in harmony with the Tao
Tao
(Chinese: 道; pinyin: Dào; literally: "the Way", also romanized as Dao)
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Spirit Road
A spirit way (Chinese: 神道; pinyin: Shéndào) is the ornate road leading to a Chinese tomb of a major dignitary. The term is also sometimes translated as spirit road,[1] spirit path or sacred way. The spirit way is lined on both sides by a succession of statues, pillars, and stelae. The statues along the spirit way depict real and mythical animals, as well as civilian and military officials.Contents1 History1.1 Eastern Han Dynasty 1.2 Southern Dynasties 1.3 Ming Dynasty2 Notable examples 3 See also 4 References 5 External linksHistory[edit] Eastern Han Dynasty[edit] Spirit ways were a well-developed feature of tombs by the time of the Eastern Han Dynasty.[2][3] A traditional burial site of an emperor or a high official of that era would be typically arranged along the north-south axis; the spirit road would lead from the south to the southern gate of the enclosure within which the tomb itself and the associated buildings were located
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Luting
Lute (from Latin Lutum, meaning mud, clay etc.)[1] was a substance used to seal and affix apparatus employed in chemistry and alchemy, and to protect component vessels against heat damage by fire; it was also used to line furnaces. Lutation was thus the act of "cementing vessels with lute". In pottery, luting is a technique for joining pieces of unfired leather-hard clay together, using a wet clay slip or slurry as adhesive. The complete object is then fired. Large objects are often built up in this way, for example the figures of the Terracotta Army in ancient China
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Slip (ceramics)
A slip is a liquid mixture or slurry of clay and/or other materials suspended in water. It has many uses in the production of pottery, and other ceramics ware.[1] In pottery the two most important uses of slip are: firstly, to create the basic shape by slipcasting with moulds, and secondly, to decorate the pottery, which is discussed below. Engobe, from the French word for slip, is an American English
American English
term for materials similar to a slip, though the definition seems variable. Some American sources say it is synonymous with slip, and use it in preference to "slip",[2] while others draw distinctions,[3] mainly in terms of engobe using materials other than clay
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Psychology
Psychology
Psychology
is the science of behavior and mind, including conscious and unconscious phenomena, as well as thought. It is an academic discipline of immense scope and diverse interests that, when taken together, seek an understanding of the emergent properties of brains, and all the variety of epiphenomena they manifest. As a social science it aims to understand individuals and groups by establishing general principles and researching specific cases.[1][2] In this field, a professional practitioner or researcher is called a psychologist and can be classified as a social, behavioral, or cognitive scientist
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Sui Dynasty
The Sui Dynasty (/swiː/;[3] Chinese: 隋朝; pinyin: Suí cháo) was a short-lived imperial dynasty of China
China
of pivotal significance. The Sui unified the Northern and Southern dynasties
Northern and Southern dynasties
and reinstalled the rule of ethnic Han Chinese
Han Chinese
in the entirety of China
China
proper, along with sinicization of former nomadic ethnic minorities (the Five Barbarians) within its territory
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Yang Guifei
Yang Yuhuan (simplified Chinese: 杨玉环; traditional Chinese: 楊玉環; pinyin: Yáng Yùhuán; Wade–Giles: Yang2 Yü4-huan2) (26 June,[citation needed] 719 — 15 July 756[1]), often known as Yang Guifei (Yang Kuei-fei; simplified Chinese: 杨贵妃; traditional Chinese: 楊貴妃; pinyin: Yáng Guìfēi; Wade–Giles: Yang2 Kuei4-fei1; literally: "Imperial Consort Yang") (with Guifei being the highest rank for imperial consorts during her time), known briefly by the Taoist nun name Taizhen (太真),[2] was known as one of the Four Beauties of ancient China. She was the beloved consort of Emperor Xuanzong of Tang during his later years. During the An Lushan
An Lushan
Rebellion, as Emperor Xuanzong and his cortege were fleeing from the capital Chang'an
Chang'an
to Chengdu, the emperor's guards demanded that he put Yang to death because they blamed the rebellion on her cousin Yang Guozhong and the rest of her family
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Sprigging
Sprigging is the planting of sprigs, plant sections cut from rhizomes or stolons that includes crowns and roots, at spaced intervals in furrows or holes.[1] Depending on the environment, this may be done by hand or with mechanical row planters.[1][2] Sprigging uses no soil with the plant, and is an alternative to seeding (planting seeds directly), plugging (transplanting plugs with intact soil and roots), and sodding (installing harvested sheets of sod).[2] Stolonizing is essentially broadcast sprigging, using cut stolons and rhizomes spread uniformly over an area mechanically or by hand, then covered with soil or pressed into the planting bed by various means.[2][3] Hydrosprigging, similar to hydroseeding, is the use of sprigs or cut stolons and rhizomes in a slurry of fertilizer, mulch, and binding agent, sprayed with a hose over a target area.[1] This can be effective in areas sensitive to soil surface disturbance, such as eroding shorelines, hillsides or other slopes of varying ste
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Chang'an
Chang'an
Chang'an
([ʈʂʰǎŋ.án] ( listen); simplified Chinese: 长安; traditional Chinese: 長安) was an ancient capital of more than ten dynasties in Chinese history, today known as Xi'an. Chang'an means "Perpetual Peace" in Classical Chinese
Classical Chinese
since it was a capital that was repeatedly used by new Chinese rulers. During the short-lived Xin dynasty, the city was renamed "Constant Peace" (Chinese: 常安; pinyin: Cháng'ān); yet after its fall in AD 23, the old name was restored
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Silk Road
The Silk
Silk
Road was an ancient network of trade routes connecting the East and West which for centuries was central to cultural interaction between them.[1][2][3] The Silk
Silk
Road refers to both the terrestrial and the maritime routes connecting Asia with the Middle East
Middle East
and southern Europe. The Silk
Silk
Road derives its name from the lucrative trade in silk carried out along its length, beginning in the Han dynasty
Han dynasty
(207 BCE–220 CE)
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