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Tampukancha
Tampukancha (Quechua, tampu inn, kancha enclosure, enclosed place, yard, a frame, or wall that encloses,[1] Hispanicized Tambocancha, also Tambokancha) is an ancient Incan religious center located in Peru. It is located in the Cusco
Cusco
Region, Anta Province, Zurite District,[2] about 30 miles from Cusco, the historic capital of the Inca
Inca
Empire.[3] References[edit]^ Teofilo Laime Ajacopa, Diccionario Bilingüe Iskay simipi yuyayk'ancha, La Paz, 2007 (Quechua-Spanish dictionary) ^ mincetur.gob.pe "Zona Arqueológica de Tambocancha" (in Spanish) ^ Catchpole, Heather (21 September 2004). "Incans smash and burn before leaving". News in Science
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Peru
Coordinates: 10°S 76°W / 10°S 76°W / -10; -76 Republic
Republic
of Peru República del Perú  (Spanish)[a]FlagCoat of armsMotto: "Firme y feliz por la unión" (Spanish) "Firm and Happy for the Union"Anthem: "Himno Nacional del Perú"  (Spanish) "National Anthem of Peru"National SealGran Sello del Estado  (Spanish) Great Seal of the StateLocation of  Peru  (dark green) in South America  (grey)Capital and largest city Lima 12°2.6′S 77°1.7′W / 12.0433°S 77.0283°W / -12.0433; -77.0283<
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Tambo (Incan Structure)
A tambo (Quechua: tampu, "inn") was an Incan
Incan
structure built for administrative and military purposes
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Cerro Baúl
Cerro Baúl
Cerro Baúl
(Spanish: Cerro "hill", Spanish: Baúl "trunk" (i.e. a place to store treasured items)) is an ancient political outpost and ceremonial center settlement in Peru
Peru
established by the pre-Incan empire called the Wari. It was evacuated after a siege by the Inca Empire in about 1475. Cerro Baúl
Cerro Baúl
is a terraced mountain, 2000 feet above its surroundings, with a settlement on the cliff tops themselves and in the immediate surroundings. Among other finds are the remnants of a brewery and large buildings that may have been used for ceremonial feasting
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Chacamarca Historic Sanctuary
Chacamarca Historic Sanctuary[1] (Spanish: Santuario Histórico de Chacamarca), is a historical site in Junín Province, Junín, Peru.[1] The sanctuary protects the site of the Battle of Junín
Battle of Junín
and archaeological remains of the Pumpush culture.[1][2]Contents1 History 2 Geography 3 Climate 4 Ecology4.1 Flora 4.2 Fauna5 Activities 6 Environmental issues 7 References 8 External linksHistory[edit] Prior to the arrival of the conquistadors, the area was occupied by the Pumpush and the Yarovilca cultures and after them, the Incas.[2] The Incas occupied the area gradually and integrated it to the rest of the empire
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Cusco Region
Cusco, also spelled Cuzco (Spanish pronunciation: [ˈkusko]; Quechua: Qusqu suyu), is a region in Peru. It is bordered by the Ucayali Region
Ucayali Region
on the north; the Madre de Dios and Puno regions on the east; the Arequipa Region
Arequipa Region
on the south; and the Apurímac, Ayacucho and Junín regions on the west. Its capital is Cusco, the capital of the Inca
Inca
Empire.[2]Contents1 Geography 2 Provinces 3 Languages 4 Toponyms 5 Gallery 6 See also 7 Sources 8 External linksGeography[edit] The plain of Anta contains some of the best communal cultivated lands of the Cusco
Cusco
Region
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Quechua Language
Quechua (/ˈkɛtʃuə/, in AmE also /ˈkɛtʃwɑː/)[2], known as Runasimi ("people's language") in the Quechuan language, is an indigenous language family, with variations spoken by the Quechua peoples, primarily living in the Andes
Andes
and highlands of South America.[3] Derived from a common ancestral language, it is the most widely spoken language family of indigenous peoples of the Americas, with a total of probably some 8–10 million speakers.[4] Approximately 25% (7.7 million) of Peruvians speak some variation of Quechua.[5][6] It is perhaps most widely known for being the main language of the Inca Empire. The colonisers initially encouraged its use, but from the middle of their reign they suppressed it
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Cheqollo
Cheqollo (Quechua for nightingale)[1] is an archaeological site in Peru. It is located in the Cusco Region, Cusco Province, San Jerónimo District, north of San Jerónimo.[2] The site was declared a National Cultural Heritage (Patrimonio Cultural) by Resolucion Directorial Nacional No. 514/ 2003.[2] See also[edit]Pachatusan Wanakawri WaqutuReferences[edit]^ Teofilo Laime Ajacopa, Diccionario Bilingüe Iskay simipi yuyayk'ancha, La Paz, 2007 (Quechua-Spanish dictionary) ^ a b "Sitio Arqueológico de Cheqollo". mincetur. Archived from the original on March 4, 2016
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El Paraíso, Peru
Coordinates: 11°57′14″S 77°7′6″W / 11.95389°S 77.11833°W / -11.95389; -77.11833El ParaísoMain pyramid at El Paraíso.Shown within PeruLocation San Martin de Porres, Chillon River Valley,  PeruRegion Chillon River ValleyCoordinates 11°57′13.68″S 77°7′6.39″W / 11.9538000°S 77.1184417°W / -11.9538000; -77.1184417HistoryFounded 3790 cal. B.P.Abandoned 3065 cal B.P.Periods Cotton
Cotton
PreceramicSite notesExcavation dates 1960s, Frédérick Engel; 1980s Jeffrey QuilterArchaeologistsJeffrey Quilter, Ripon College, Wisconsin ?ArchitectureArchitectural details Number of monuments: 10Responsible body: Ministry of Culture, PeruEl Paraíso (IPA: /el pa.raˈi.so/, "ell pah-rah-EE-so") is the modern name of a Late Preceramic (3500-1800 BC) archaeological site located in the Chillón Valley on the central coast of Peru
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Cerro Pátapo Ruins
The Cerro Pátapo ruins
Cerro Pátapo ruins
or Northern Wari ruins
Wari ruins
are the remains of an entire prehistoric city relatively near the site of present-day Chiclayo, Peru. The ruins are primarily of the Wari (Huari) culture, which flourished from 350 CE to 1000 CE in the area along the coast and reaching to the highlands. These northern Wari ruins
Wari ruins
are distinguished from the Wari ruins
Wari ruins
in the Ayacucho Region
Ayacucho Region
to the south. The discovery was announced on 16 December 2008 by the lead archeologist, Cesar Soriano
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El Brujo
The El Brujo
El Brujo
Archaeological Complex, just north of Trujillo, La Libertad Province, Peru, is an ancient archaeological site that was occupied from preceramic times. Huaca Prieta
Huaca Prieta
is the earliest part of the complex. Later, the site was part of the Cupisnique
Cupisnique
culture and the Salinar culture. But the biggest constructions on the site belong to the Moche culture. In this area, there are also the remains of the later Lambayeque and Chimú.Contents1 Moche period 2 17th-century 3 See also 4 References 5 External linksMoche period[edit] Huaca El Brujo
El Brujo
(or Cortada/Partida) and Huaca Cao Viejo (or Huaca Blanca) were built by the Moche sometime between AD 1 and 600. Huaca Cao Viejo is famous for its polychrome reliefs and mural paintings, and the discovery of the Señora de Cao, whose remains are currently the earliest evidence for a female ruler in Peru
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Chan Chan
Chan Chan, the largest city of the pre-Columbian era in South America,[1] is now an archaeological site in La Libertad Region
La Libertad Region
5 kilometres (3.1 mi) west of Trujillo, Peru.[2] Chan Chan
Chan Chan
is located in the mouth of the Moche Valley[3] and was the capit
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Chanquillo
Chanquillo[1][2][3][4][5] or Chankillo[3][6][7][8] is an ancient monumental complex in the Peruvian coastal desert, found in the Casma-Sechin basin in the Ancash Department of Peru. The ruins include the hilltop Chankillo fort, the nearby Thirteen Towers solar observatory, and residential and gathering areas
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Chauchilla Cemetery
Chauchilla Cemetery
Cemetery
is a cemetery that contains prehispanic mummified human remains and archeological artifacts, located 30 kilometres (19 mi) south of the city of Nazca
Nazca
in Peru.[1][2]Contents1 History 2 Preservation of the bodies 3 In popular culture 4 See also 5 ReferencesHistory[edit] The cemetery was discovered in the 1920s,[3] but had not been used since the 9th century AD. The cemetery includes many important burials over a period of 600 to 700 years. The start of the interments was in about 200 AD. It is important as a source of archaeology to Nazca culture.[4] The cemetery has been extensively plundered by huaqueros (grave robbers) who have left human bones and pottery scattered around the area.[4] Similar local cemeteries have been damaged to a greater extent.[2] The site has been protected by Peruvian law since 1997 and tourists pay around seven U.S. dollars
U.S

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Chavín De Huantar
Chavín de Huántar is an archaeological site in Peru, containing ruins and artifacts constructed beginning at least by 1200 BC and occupied by later cultures until around 400-500 BC by the Chavín, a major pre- Inca
Inca
culture. The site is located in the Ancash Region, 250 kilometers (160 mi) north of Lima, at an elevation of 3,180 meters (10,430 ft), east of the Cordillera Blanca
Cordillera Blanca
at the start of the Conchucos Valley. Chavín de Huántar has been designated a UNESCO World Heritage Site. Some of the Chavín relics from this archaeological site are on display in the Museo de la Nación
Museo de la Nación
in Lima and the Museo Nacional de Chavín in Chavin itself. Occupation at Chavín de Huántar has been carbon dated to at least 3000 BC, with ceremonial center activity occurring primarily toward the end of the second millennium, and through the middle of the first millennium BC
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Chawaytiri
Chawaytiri (hispanicized Chahuaytire, Chahuaytiri) is an archaeological site with rock paintings in Peru. It is situated in the Cusco Region, Calca Province, Pisac District, near the village Chawaytiri.[1][2] The principal section with paintings predominantly showing llamas is named Llamachayuq Qaqa (Quechua llama llama, -cha, -yuq suffixes, qaqa rock,[3] "a rock with a little llama") or Chawaytiri. It lies on the slope of the mountain Muruwiksa (Moro-Wicsa, Morowiqsa, Morro Huicsa). The other sections are named Wamanwachana, Kawituyuq (Cahuituyoc), P'allqapata (Pallcapata), Musuqllaqta (Mosoqllaqta), Misaqaqa and Qaqa.[1] References[edit]^ a b Rainer Hostnig, Pinturas rupestres de posible afiliación Inca en el departamento del Cusco, SIARB
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