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Tambora (Dominican Drum)
The Dominican tambora (from the Spanish word tambor, meaning "drum") is a two headed drum played in merengue music. In many countries, especially the Dominican Republic, tamboras were made from salvaged rum barrels.[1] Performers on the tambora are referred to as tamboreros.Contents1 Types 2 Role in Merengue 3 Basic strokes 4 External links 5 ReferencesTypes[edit] There are three types of tambora for the merengue style of music. The oldest kind is the rope-tuned tambora with black-colored heads. This is seen more in folkloric music of the Dominican republic and Afro-Caribbean slaves. The second type is a rope tuned tambora played with goatskin, or "chivo" heads, either with or without the hair left on. The third type, as made by modern companies, is bolt-tuned with rawhide conga heads. This kind usually has metal or wooden rims to hit as a filler for rhythms, sounding, if one strikes it correctly, something reminiscent of a wood block
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Tambora (other)
Tambora may refer to: Music[edit]Tambora (drum), different types of percussion instruments Tambour (guitar technique) can also be spelled tamboraGeography[edit]Mount Tambora, a volcano on the Indonesian island of SumbawaThe 1815 eruption of Mount Tambora Tambora culture, a village and associated culture on Sumbawa, destroyed by the 1815 eruption Tambora language, the associated languageTambora, Jakarta, a subdistrict of West Jakarta Tumbura, a town in South SudanSee also[edit]Tambour (other) Tanpura, an instrument used in Indian classical music for continuous production of consonating reference notes (tonic)This disambiguation page lists articles associated with the title Tambora. If an internal link led you here, you may wish to change the link to point directly to the inten
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Spanish Language
The Spanish language
Spanish language
(/ˈspænɪʃ/ ( listen);  Español (help·info)), also called the Castilian language[4] (/kæˈstɪliən/ ( listen),  castellano (help·info)), is a Western Romance language that originated in the Castile region of Spain
Spain
and today has hundreds of millions of native speakers in Latin
Latin
America and Spain. It is usually considered the world's second-most spoken native language, after Mandarin Chinese.[5][6][7][8][9] Spanish is a part of the Ibero-Romance group of languages, which evolved from several dialects of Vulgar Latin
Vulgar Latin
in Iberia after the collapse of the Western Roman Empire
Western Roman Empire
in the 5th century
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Goatskin (material)
Goatskin refers to the skin of a goat, which by long term usage, is denoted by the term Morocco leather.[1] Kidskin, used for gloves, shoes and other accessories, is traditionally goatskin, although other leathers such as sheep and kangaroo can be used to make kid.[2][3] Tanned leather from goatskin is considered extremely durable and is commonly used to make rugs (for example in Indonesia) and carpet binding. It is often used for gloves, boots, and other products that require a soft hide. Kid gloves, popular in Victorian times, are still made today. It has been a major material for leather bookbindings for centuries, and the oldest European binding, that of the St Cuthbert Gospel in the British Library
British Library
is in red goatskin. Goatskin is used for a traditional Spanish container for wine bota bag (or called goatskin)
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Wood Block
A wood block (also spelled as a single word, woodblock) is a small slit drum made from a single piece of wood and used as a percussion instrument. The term generally signifies the Western orchestral instrument, though it is related to the ban time-beaters used by the Han Chinese, which is why the Western instrument is sometimes referred to as Chinese woodblock. Alternative names sometimes used in ragtime and jazz are clog box and tap box. In orchestral music scores, wood blocks may be indicated by the French bloc de bois or tambour de bois, German Holzblock or Holzblocktrommel, or Italian cassa di legno (Blades and Holland 2001). The orchestral wood-block instrument of the West is generally made from teak or another hardwood
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Güira
The güira (Spanish pronunciation: [ˈɡwiɾa]) is a metal scraper from the Dominican Republic
Dominican Republic
used as a percussion instrument in cumbia and merengue, to a lesser extent, other genres such as bachata. It is made of a metal sheet (commonly steel, sometimes from a five-gallon oil can) and played with a stiff brush, thus being similar to the Cuban guayo (also a metal scraper) and the güiro (a gourd scraper)
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Timbales
Timbales
Timbales
(/tɪmˈbɑːliːz/) or pailas are shallow single-headed drums with metal casing. They are shallower than single-headed tom-toms, and usually tuned much higher. The player (called a timbalero) uses a variety of stick strokes, rim shots, and rolls to produce a wide range of percussive expression during solos and at transitional sections of music, and usually plays the shells of the drum or auxiliary percussion such as a cowbell or cymbal to keep time in other parts of the song. The shells are referred to as cáscara (the Spanish word for shell), which is also the name of a rhythmic pattern common in salsa music that is played on the shells of the timbales. The shells are usually made of metal, but some manufacturers offer shells of maple and other woods
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Percussion
A percussion instrument is a musical instrument that is sounded by being struck or scraped by a beater (including attached or enclosed beaters or rattles); struck, scraped or rubbed by hand; or struck against another similar instrument. The percussion family is believed to include the oldest musical instruments, following the human voice.[1] The percussion section of an orchestra most commonly contains instruments such as timpani, snare drum, bass drum, cymbals, triangle and tambourine. However, the section can also contain non-percussive instruments, such as whistles and sirens, or a blown conch shell. Percussive techniques can also be applied to the human body, as in body percussion
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Percussion Instrument
A percussion instrument is a musical instrument that is sounded by being struck or scraped by a beater (including attached or enclosed beaters or rattles); struck, scraped or rubbed by hand; or struck against another similar instrument. The percussion family is believed to include the oldest musical instruments, following the human voice.[1] The percussion section of an orchestra most commonly contains instruments such as timpani, snare drum, bass drum, cymbals, triangle and tambourine. However, the section can also contain non-percussive instruments, such as whistles and sirens, or a blown conch shell. Percussive techniques can also be applied to the human body, as in body percussion
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992
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Conga
The conga, also known as tumbadora, is a tall, narrow, single-headed drum from Cuba. Congas are staved like barrels and classified into three types: quinto (lead drum, highest), tres dos or tres golpes (middle), and tumba or salidor (lowest). Congas were originally used in Afro-Cuban music genres such as conga (hence their name) and rumba, where each drummer would play a single drum. Following numerous innovations in conga drumming and construction during the mid-20th century, as well as its internationalization, it became increasingly common for drummers to play two or three drums
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Dominican Republic
Coordinates: 19°00′N 70°40′W / 19.000°N 70.667°W / 19.000; -70.667Dominican Republic República Dominicana  (Spanish)FlagCoat of armsMotto: "Dios, Patria, Libertad" (Spanish) "God, Homeland, Freedom"Anthem: Quisqueyanos Valientes Valiant Quisqueyans Capital and largest city Santo Domingo 19°00′N 70°40′W / 19.000°N 70.667°W / 19.000; -70.667Official languages SpanishEthnic groups 87.5% Dominican 10.2% Haitian 2.3% otherDemonym Dominican Quisqueyano (colloquial)[1]Government Unitary presidential republic[2]• PresidentDanilo Medina• Vice PresidentMargarita Cedeño de FernándezLegislature Congress• Upper houseSenate• Lower houseChamber of DeputiesIndependence• from
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Merengue Music
Merengue is a type of music and dance originating in the Dominican Republic, which has become a very popular genre throughout Latin America, and also in several major cities in the United States
United States
which have Hispanic communities.[2] Merengue was first mentioned around the middle of the 19th century and has locally been very popular since then. The genre was later promoted even more by Rafael Trujillo, the dictator from 1930 to 1961, who turned it into the country's national music and dance style. In the United States
United States
it was first popularized by New York-based groups and bandleaders like Rafael Petiton Guzman, beginning in the 1930s, and Angel Viloria y su Conjunto
Conjunto
Típico Cibaeño in the 1950s
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Pambiche
Pambiche is a Dominican music genre and dance form derived from merengue típico, the traditional style of merengue. It has a slower tempo than standard merengue and its tambora rhythm is based on the cinquillo.[1] This style of merengue was originally known as merengue estilo yanqui (yankee-style merengue) or "Palm Beach one step", from which the term pambiche stems (corruption of "Palm Beach"). It is said to have originated from the americanized versions of merengue that the US military personnel performed during the occupation of the Dominican Republic
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Tambora (Dominican Drum)
The Dominican tambora (from the Spanish word tambor, meaning "drum") is a two headed drum played in merengue music. In many countries, especially the Dominican Republic, tamboras were made from salvaged rum barrels.[1] Performers on the tambora are referred to as tamboreros.Contents1 Types 2 Role in Merengue 3 Basic strokes 4 External links 5 ReferencesTypes[edit] There are three types of tambora for the merengue style of music. The oldest kind is the rope-tuned tambora with black-colored heads. This is seen more in folkloric music of the Dominican republic and Afro-Caribbean slaves. The second type is a rope tuned tambora played with goatskin, or "chivo" heads, either with or without the hair left on. The third type, as made by modern companies, is bolt-tuned with rawhide conga heads. This kind usually has metal or wooden rims to hit as a filler for rhythms, sounding, if one strikes it correctly, something reminiscent of a wood block
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Merengue Tipico
Merengue típico (also known as merengue cibaeño or colloquially as Perico ripiao) is a musical genre of the Dominican Republic, and the oldest style of merengue. Merengue típico is the term preferred by most musicians as it is more respectful and emphasizes the music's traditional nature. The Instruments that are used are the accordion, bass guitar, güira, conga, and tambora (drum)Contents1 Introduction 2 Early Origins2.1 Controversy 2.2 Changes, Fusions, and innovations2.2.1 1970–1980s 2.2.2 1990s–present3 Rhythms 4 Merengue terminology 5 Notable musicians and songwriters 6 References 7 External linksIntroduction[edit] Merengue típico is the oldest style of merengue still performed today (usually in the Dominican Republic and the United States), its origins dating back to the 1850s
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