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TaleSpin
TaleSpin
TaleSpin
is an American animated television series based in the fictional city of Cape Suzette, that first aired in 1990 as a preview on The Disney Channel
The Disney Channel
and later that year as part of The Disney Afternoon, with characters adapted from Disney's 1967 animated feature The Jungle Book, which was theatrically rereleased in the summer before this show premiered in the fall.[1] The name of the show is a play on tailspin, the rapid descent of an aircraft in a steep spiral. The two words in the show's name, tale and spin, are a way to describe telling a story.[2] The show is one of the ten Disney Afternoon shows to use established Disney characters as the main characters, with the others being Darkwing Duck, DuckTales, Chip 'n Dale
Chip 'n Dale
Rescue Rangers, Goof Troop, Bonkers, Quack Pack, Aladdin, Timon & Pumbaa and Jungle Cubs
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Anime
Anime
Anime
(/ˈænəˌmeɪ/ (Japanese: アニメ, [aɲime] ( listen), plural: anime))[a] is a style of hand-drawn and computer animation originating in, and commonly associated with, Japan. The word anime is the Japanese term for animation, which means all forms of animated media.[1] Outside Japan, anime refers specifically to animation from Japan
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First-run Syndication
Broadcasting
Broadcasting
syndication is the license to broadcast television programs and radio programs by multiple television stations and radio stations, without going through a broadcast network. It is common in the United States where broadcast programming is scheduled by television networks with local independent affiliates. Syndication is less of a practice in the rest of the world, as most countries have centralized networks or television stations without local affiliates; although less common, shows can be syndicated internationally
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Casablanca (film)
Casablanca
Casablanca
is a 1942 American romantic drama film directed by Michael Curtiz based on Murray Burnett and Joan Alison's unproduced stage play Everybody Comes to Rick's. The film stars Humphrey Bogart, Ingrid Bergman, and Paul Henreid; it also features Claude Rains, Conrad Veidt, Sydney Greenstreet, Peter Lorre, and Dooley Wilson. Set during contemporary World War II, it focuses on an American expatriate who must choose between his love for a woman and helping her and her husband, a Czech Resistance leader, escape from the Vichy-controlled city of Casablanca
Casablanca
to continue his fight against the Nazis. Story editor Irene Diamond
Irene Diamond
convinced producer Hal B. Wallis
Hal B. Wallis
to purchase the film rights to the play in January 1942. Brothers Julius and Philip G
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Rick Blaine
Casablanca is a 1942 American romantic drama film directed by Michael Curtiz based on Murray Burnett and Joan Alison's unproduced stage play Everybody Comes to Rick's. The film stars Humphrey Bogart, Ingrid Bergman, and Paul Henreid; it also features Claude Rains, Conrad Veidt, Sydney Greenstreet, Peter Lorre, and Dooley Wilson. Set during contemporary World War II, it focuses on an American expatriate who must choose between his love for a woman and helping her and her husband, a Czech Resistance leader, escape from the Vichy-controlled city of Casablanca to continue his fight against the Nazis. Story editor Irene Diamond convinced producer Hal B. Wallis to purchase the film rights to the play in January 1942. Brothers Julius and Philip G. Epstein were initially assigned to write the script. However, despite studio resistance, they left to work on Frank Capra's Why We Fight series early in 1942. Howard E. Koch was assigned to the screenplay until the Epsteins returned a month later
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Rebecca Howe
Rebecca Howe
Rebecca Howe
is a fictional character of the American television sitcom Cheers, portrayed by Kirstie Alley
Kirstie Alley
and created by Glen and Les Charles. Rebecca appeared in 147 episodes of Cheers
Cheers
between 1987 and 1993 and in one episode of Wings. She debuts in the season six episode "Home Is the Sailor" after Shelley Long—who played waitress Diane Chambers—left the show to pursue a movie career. Much of the show's humor in previous seasons had been based around the interaction and sexual tension between the womanizing, working-class main character, bartender Sam Malone, and the high-class, snobbish Diane. Rebecca was intended to fill the gap as Sam's new female foil.[1] From the character's debut, Rebecca manages the bar under corporation and frequently rejects Sam's advances. She gradually becomes neurotic and falls in love with almost every rich man in Boston
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Cheers
Cheers
Cheers
is an American sitcom that ran on NBC
NBC
from September 30, 1982, to May 20, 1993, with a total of 275 half-hour episodes spanning over eleven seasons. The show was produced by Charles/Burrows/Charles Productions in association with Paramount Network Television. The show was created by the team of James Burrows, Glen Charles, and Les Charles. The show is set in a bar named Cheers
Cheers
in Boston, Massachusetts, where a group of locals meet to drink, relax, and socialize. The show's main theme song, co-written and performed by Gary Portnoy, lent its refrain "Where Everybody Knows Your Name" as the show's catchphrase.[2] After premiering on September 30, 1982, it was nearly canceled during its first season when it ranked almost last in ratings for its premiere (74th out of 77 shows)
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Tailspin
A spin is a special category of stall resulting in autorotation about the vertical axis and a shallow, rotating, downward path. Spins can be entered intentionally or unintentionally, from any flight attitude if the aircraft has sufficient yaw while at the stall point. [1] In a normal spin, the wing on the inside of the turn is stalled while the outside wing remains flying; it is possible for both wings to be stalled but the angle of attack of each wing, and consequently its lift and drag, will be different.[2] Either situation causes the aircraft to autorotate (yaw) toward the stalled wing due to its higher drag and loss of lift. Spins are characterized by high angle of attack, an airspeed below the stall on at least one wing and a shallow descent. Recovery may require a specific and counterintuitive set of actions in order to avoid a crash. A spin differs from a spiral dive in which neither wing is stalled and which is characterized by a low angle of attack and high airspeed
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The Walt Disney Company
The Walt Disney
Walt Disney
Company, commonly known as Disney (/ˈdɪzni/),[4] is an American diversified multinational mass media and entertainment conglomerate, headquartered at the Walt Disney
Walt Disney
Studios in Burbank, California. It is the world's second-largest media conglomerate in terms of revenue, after Comcast.[5] Disney was founded on October 16, 1923 – by brothers Walt Disney
Walt Disney
and Roy O. Disney
Roy O. Disney
– as the Disney Brothers Cartoon Studio, and established itself as a leader in the American animation industry before diversifying into live-action film production, television, and theme parks. The company also operated under the names The Walt Disney
Walt Disney
Studio and then Walt Disney Productions
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Hikōtei Jidai
Hikōtei Jidai (飛行艇時代, lit. The Age of the Flying Boat) is a fifteen-page, all-watercolor manga, on which the animated film "Porco Rosso" is based. It was published in Model Graphix in three parts, a monthly magazine about scale models, as a part of Hayao Miyazaki's "Zassou Note" series. Like other manga in this series, "Hikōtei Jidai" is a manifestation of his love for old planes
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SDTV
Standard-definition television
Standard-definition television
(SDTV or SD) is a television system which uses a resolution that's not considered to be either high-definition television (720p, 1080i, 1080p, 1440p, 4K UHDTV, and 8K UHD) or enhanced-definition television (EDTV 480p). The two common SDTV signal types are 576i, with 576 interlaced lines of resolution, derived from the European-developed PAL
PAL
and SECAM
SECAM
systems; and 480i based on the American National Television System Committee NTSC system
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Hayao Miyazaki
Hayao Miyazaki
Hayao Miyazaki
(宮崎 駿, Miyazaki Hayao, born January 5, 1941) is a Japanese film director, producer, screenwriter, animator, author, and manga artist. A co-founder of Studio Ghibli, a film and animation studio, he has attained international acclaim as a masterful storyteller and as a maker of anime feature films, and is widely regarded as one of the greatest animation directors. Born in Bunkyō
Bunkyō
Ward of Tokyo, Miyazaki expressed interest in manga and animation from an early age, and he joined Toei Animation
Toei Animation
in 1963. During his early years at Toei Animation
Toei Animation
he worked as an in-between artist and later collaborated with director Isao Takahata. Notable films to which Miyazaki contributed at Toei include Doggie March and Gulliver's Travels Beyond the Moon
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Fantasy Film
Fantasy
Fantasy
films are films that belong to the fantasy genre with fantastic themes, usually magic, supernatural events, mythology, folklore, or exotic fantasy worlds. The genre is considered a form of speculative fiction alongside science fiction films and horror films, although the genres do overlap
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Action Film
Action film
Action film
is a genre in which the protagonist or protagonists are thrust into a series of challenges that typically include violence, extended fighting, physical feats, and frantic chases. Action films tend to feature a resourceful hero struggling against incredible odds, which include life-threatening situations, a villain, or a pursuit which generally concludes in victory for the hero (though a small number of films in this genre have ended in victory for the villain instead). Advancements in CGI have made it cheaper and easier to create action sequences and other visual effects that required the efforts of professional stunt crews in the past
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Adventure Film
Adventure films are a genre of film that typically use their action scenes to display and explore exotic locations in an energetic way.[citation needed]Contents1 Overview 2 History 3 Popular concepts 4 See also 5 References 6 External linksOverview[edit] Subgenres of adventure films include swashbuckler films, survival films, pirate films, time travel films, disaster films, epic films, superhero films, road films and historical dramas.[citation needed] Main plot elements include quests for lost continents; a jungle, mountain, island, sea, space, tundra, wilderness, city, or desert setting; characters embarking on treasure and heroic journeys, facing dangers, travels and explorations for the unknown, usually also having to overcome an adversary.[citation needed] Adventure films are commonly set in a period background and may include adapted stories of historical or fictional adventure heroes within the historical context
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Comedy-drama
Comedy-drama, occasionally known as dramedy (portmanteau of words drama and comedy),[1] is a subgenre in contemporary forms of tragicomedy, especially in television, that combines elements of comedy and drama.[2][3] History[edit] The advent of radio drama, cinema, and in particular, television created greater pressure in marketing to clearly define a product as either comedy or drama. While in live theatre the difference became less and less significant, in mass media comedy and drama were clearly divided. Comedies were expected to keep a consistently light tone and not challenge the viewer by introducing more serious content. By the early 1960s, television companies commonly presented half-hour-long "comedy" series or hour-long "dramas"
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