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Taitō
Taitō
Taitō
(台東区, Taitō-ku) is a special ward located in Tokyo Metropolis, Japan. In English, it is known as Taitō
Taitō
City.[1] As of May 1, 2015, the ward has an estimated population of 186,276, and a population density of 18,420 persons per km². The total area is 10.11 km². This makes Taito
Taito
ward the smallest of Tokyo's wards in area, and third smallest in population.Contents1 History 2 Geography 3 Landmarks3.1 Districts 3.2 Temples and shrines 3.3 Parks 3.4 Museums and zoos 3.5 Entertainment4 Education4.1 Colleges and universities 4.2 Primary and secondary schools 4.3 Public libraries 4.4 Other5 Economy5.1 Retail 5.2 Other6 Events 7 Transportation7.1 Rail 7.2 Highways8 Sports and recreation 9 References 10 External linksHistory[edit] The ward was founded on March 15, 1947
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Yokoyama Taikan
Yokoyama Taikan
Yokoyama Taikan
(横山 大観, November 2, 1868 – February 26, 1958) was the pseudonym of a major figure in pre-World War II Japanese painting. He is notable for helping create the Japanese painting technique of Nihonga. His real name was Sakai Hidemaro.Contents1 Early life 2 Artistic career 3 Honours3.1 Order of precedence4 Philately 5 References 6 External linksEarly life[edit] Yokoyama was born in Mito city, Ibaraki Prefecture, as the eldest son of Sakai Sutehiko, an ex-samurai family in Mito clan. He was adopted into his mother's family, from whom he took the surname "Yokoyama". With his family, he moved to Tokyo in 1878. He studied at the Tōkyō Furitsu Daiichi Chūgakkō (Hibiya High School), and was interested in the English language and in western style oil painting. This led him to study pencil drawing with a painter, Watanabe Fumisaburo
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UTC+9
UTC+09:00 is an identifier for a time offset from UTC
UTC
of +09. During the Japanese occupations of Borneo, Burma, Hong Kong, Dutch East Indies, Malaya, Philippines, Singapore, and French Indochina, it was used as a common time with Tokyo
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Kaminarimon
The Kaminarimon
Kaminarimon
(雷門, " Thunder
Thunder
Gate") is the outer of two large entrance gates that ultimately leads to the Sensō-ji
Sensō-ji
(the inner being the Hōzōmon) in Asakusa, Tokyo, Japan. The gate, with its lantern and statues, is popular with tourists. It stands 11.7 m tall, 11.4 m wide and covers an area of 69.3 m2.[1] The first gate was built in 941, but the current gate dates from 1960, after the previous gate was destroyed in a fire in 1865. History[edit] The Kaminarimon
Kaminarimon
was first built in 941 by Taira no Kinmasa, a military commander.[2] It was originally located near Komagata, but it was reconstructed in its current location in 1635. This is believed to be when the gods of wind and thunder were first placed on the gate.[2] The gate has been destroyed many times throughout the ages
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Kishibojin
Hārītī (Sanskrit), also known as Kishimojin (鬼子母神), is both a revered goddess and demon in some Buddhist traditions. In her positive aspect, she is regarded for the protection of children, easy delivery and happy child rearing while her negative aspects include the belief of her terror towards irresponsible parents and unruly children. In Japanese Buddhism, the variant Kishimojin is venerated both as a protector deity, but in many folk traditions is often recognized as a female demon of misery and unhappiness towards children and parents. Both popular traditions persevere in current Japanese Buddhist practices and belief.Contents1 Iconography 2 Narrative 3 References 4 BibliographyIconography[edit] Hārītī is a figure of the 26th chapter of the Lotus Sutra, and is especially important to Nichiren
Nichiren
Buddhism. In Shingon Buddhism, she is named Karitei (訶利帝) or Karitei-mo (訶梨帝母)
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Daimyo Clock Museum
The Daimyo Clock Museum
Daimyo Clock Museum
(大名時計博物館) is a small community-run museum in Yanaka 2-chōme, Tokyo. The museum was established in 1972 to display Japanese clocks from the Edo period collected by Sakujiro (known as "Guro") Kamiguchi (1892–1970).[1][2] It is the only museum in Japan exhibiting Japanese clocks.[3]Contents1 Origin of the Museum collection 2 Exhibits 3 Access 4 External links 5 ReferencesOrigin of the Museum collection[edit] Sakujiro Kamiguchi owned a highly-unusual log cabin shop which sold western clothing. The shop became known locally as "Grotesque", and this was the origin of Kamiguchi's nickname, "Guro". Kamiguchi had many interests, including pottery
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Taiwan
Taiwan
Taiwan
(/ˌtaɪˈwɑːn/ ( listen)), officially the Republic of China
China
(ROC), is a state in East Asia.[15][16][17] Its neighbors include the People's Republic of China
China
(PRC) to the west, Japan
Japan
to the northeast, and the Philippines
Philippines
to the south. It is the most populous state and largest economy that is not a member of the United Nations. The island of Taiwan, formerly known as Formosa, was inhabited by aborigines before the 17th century, when Dutch and Spanish colonies opened the island to mass Han immigration. After a brief rule by the Kingdom of Tungning, the island was annexed by the Qing dynasty, the last dynasty of China. The Qing ceded Taiwan
Taiwan
to Japan
Japan
in 1895 after the Sino-Japanese War
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Edo Period
The Edo
Edo
period (江戸時代, Edo
Edo
jidai) or Tokugawa period (徳川時代) is the period between 1603 and 1868 in the history of Japan, when Japanese society was under the rule of the Tokugawa shogunate and the country's 300 regional daimyō. The period was characterized by economic growth, strict social order, isolationist foreign policies, a stable population, "no more wars", and popular enjoyment of arts and culture. The shogunate was officially established in Edo
Edo
on March 24, 1603, by Tokugawa Ieyasu
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Population Density
Population
Population
density (in agriculture: standing stock and standing crop) is a measurement of population per unit area or unit volume; it is a quantity of type number density. It is frequently applied to living organisms, and most of the time to humans. It is a key geographical term.[1]Contents1 Biological population densities1.1 By political boundaries 1.2 Other methods of measurement2 See also2.1 Lists of entities by population density3 References 4 External linksBiological population densities[edit] Population
Population
density is population divided by total land area or water volume, as appropriate.[1] Low densities may cause an extinction vortex and lead to further reduced fertility. This is called the Allee effect
Allee effect
after the scientist who identified it
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Population
In biology, a population is all the organisms of the same group or species, which live in a particular geographical area, and have the capability of interbreeding.[1][2] The area that is used to define a sexual population is defined as the area where inter-breeding is potentially possible between any pair within the area, and where the probability of interbreeding is greater than the probability of cross-breeding with individuals from other areas.[3] In sociology, population refers to a collection of humans. Demography is a social science which entails the statistical study of human populations
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Iwasaki Yatarō
Iwasaki Yatarō
Iwasaki Yatarō
(岩崎 弥太郎, January 9, 1835 – February 7, 1885) was a Japanese financier and shipping industrialist, and the founder of Mitsubishi.[1]Contents1 Early life 2 Mitsubishi 3 See also 4 References 5 Sources 6 External linksEarly life[edit] Iwasaki was born in a provincial farming family in Aki, Tosa province (now Kōchi Prefecture), the great-grandson of a man who had sold his family's samurai status in obligation of debts. Iwasaki began his career as an employee of the Tosa clan. The clan had business interests in many parts of Japan. Iwasaki left for Edo (now Tokyo) aged nineteen for his education. He interrupted his studies a year later when his father was seriously injured in a dispute with the village headman. When the local magistrate refused to hear his case, Iwasaki accused him of corruption. Iwasaki was sent to prison for seven months
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Cherry Blossom
A cherry blossom is the flower of any of several trees of genus Prunus, particularly the Japanese cherry, Prunus
Prunus
serrulata, which is called sakura after the Japanese (桜 or 櫻; さくら).[1][2][3] Currently it is widely distributed, especially in the temperate zone of the Northern Hemisphere
Northern Hemisphere
including Japan, Taiwan, Korea, China, West Siberia, Iran, and Afghanistan.[4][5] Along with the chrysanthemum, the cherry blossom is considered the national flower of Japan.[6] Many of the varieties that have been cultivated for ornamental use do not produce fruit
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Saigō Takamori
Saigō Takamori
Saigō Takamori
(Takanaga) (西郷 隆盛 (隆永), January 23, 1828 – September 24, 1877) was one of the most influential samurai in Japanese history and one of the three great nobles who led the Meiji Restoration. Living during the late Edo
Edo
and early Meiji periods, he has been dubbed the last true samurai.[1] He was born Saigō Kokichi (西郷 小吉), and received the given name Takamori in adulthood
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Japan Standard Time
Japan
Japan
Standard Time or JST (日本標準時, Nihon Hyōjunji, or 中央標準時 Chūō Hyōjunji) is the standard timezone in Japan, 9 hours ahead of UTC (i.e. it is UTC+09:00). There is no daylight saving time, though its introduction has been debated several times. During World War II, it was often called Tokyo
Tokyo
Standard Time. Japan
Japan
Standard Time is the same as Korean Standard Time, Indonesian Eastern Standard Time, East-Timorese Standard Time and Yakutsk Time (Russia).Contents1 History 2 Time zones of the Japanese Empire 3 IANA time zone database 4 Daylight saving time
Daylight saving time
in Japan 5 See also 6 ReferencesHistory[edit] Before the Meiji era (1868–1912), each local region had its own timezone in which noon was when the sun was exactly at its zenith. As modern transportation methods, such as trains, were adopted, this practice became a source of confusion
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List Of Sovereign States
This list of sovereign states provides an overview of sovereign states around the world, with information on their status and recognition of their sovereignty. Membership within the United Nations
United Nations
system divides the 206 listed states into three categories: 193 member states,[1] 2 observer states, and 11 other states. The sovereignty dispute column indicates states whose sovereignty is undisputed (191 states) and states whose sovereignty is disputed (15 states, out of which there are 5 member states, 1 observer state and 9 other states). Compiling a list such as this can be a difficult and controversial process, as there is no definition that is binding on all the members of the community of nations concerning the criteria for statehood. For more information on the criteria used to determine the contents of this list, please see the criteria for inclusion section below
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Geographic Coordinate System
A geographic coordinate system is a coordinate system used in geography that enables every location on Earth to be specified by a set of numbers, letters or symbols.[n 1] The coordinates are often chosen such that one of the numbers represents a vertical position, and two or three of the numbers represent a horizontal position
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