HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Tagzig Olmo Lung Ring
Tagzig Olmo Lung Ring[note 1] is a non-dual spiritual realm (plane or dimension) of the Bon tradition which resides beyond dualism[disambiguation needed]. It is understood to be a timeless perfected realm where peace and joy are the very fabric of being. The Beyul
Beyul
realm of Tagzig Olmo Lung Ring
Tagzig Olmo Lung Ring
is fabled to be located to the west of Mount Kailash
Mount Kailash
and shaped like an eight-petaled lotus and divided into four regions: inner, middle, outer and boundary area
[...More...]

"Tagzig Olmo Lung Ring" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Cardinal Directions
The four cardinal directions or cardinal points are the directions north, east, south, and west, commonly denoted by their initials N, E, S, and W. East
East
and west are at right angles to north and south, with east being in the clockwise direction of rotation from north and west being directly opposite east. Points between the cardinal directions form the points of the compass. The intermediate (intercardinal or ordinal) directions are northeast (NE), southeast (SE), southwest (SW), and northwest (NW)
[...More...]

"Cardinal Directions" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Sauwastika
The term sauwastika (or sauvastika[1][2]) (as a character: 卍, 卐) is sometimes used to distinguish the left-facing from the right-facing swastika symbol, a meaning which developed in 19th century scholarship.[3] The left-facing variant is favoured in Bön
Bön
and Gurung Dharma; it is called yungdrung in Bon and Gurung Yantra in Gurung Dharma
[...More...]

"Sauwastika" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Enlightenment (spiritual)
Enlightenment is the "full comprehension of a situation".[web 1] The term is commonly used to denote the Age of Enlightenment,[note 1] but is also used in Western cultures in a religious context. It translates several Buddhist terms and concepts, most notably bodhi,[note 2] kensho and satori
[...More...]

"Enlightenment (spiritual)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Heartmind
Citta
Citta
( Pali
Pali
and Sanskrit) is one of three overlapping terms used in the nikayas to refer to the mind, the others being manas and viññāṇa
[...More...]

"Heartmind" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

International Standard Book Number
"ISBN" redirects here. For other uses, see ISBN (other).International Standard Book
Book
NumberA 13-digit ISBN, 978-3-16-148410-0, as represented by an EAN-13 bar codeAcronym ISBNIntroduced 1970; 48 years ago (1970)Managing organisation International ISBN AgencyNo. of digits 13 (formerly 10)Check digit Weighted sumExample 978-3-16-148410-0Website www.isbn-international.orgThe International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a unique[a][b] numeric commercial book identifier. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each edition and variation (except reprintings) of a book. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book would each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is 13 digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007, and 10 digits long if assigned before 2007
[...More...]

"International Standard Book Number" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Mindstream
Mind
Mind
Stream (citta-santāna) in Buddhist philosophy
Buddhist philosophy
is the moment-to-moment continuum (Sanskrit: saṃtāna) of sense impressions and mental phenomena,[1] which is also described as continuing from one life to another.[2]Contents1 Definition 2 Etymology2.1 Sanskrit 2.2 Tibetan 2.3 Chinese, Korean and Japanese3 Origins and development 4 See also 5 Notes 6 References 7 Sources 8 Further reading 9 External linksDefinition[edit] Citta-saṃtāna (Sanskrit), literally "the stream of mind",[3] is the stream of succeeding moments of mind or awareness. It provides a continuity of the personality in the absence of a permanently abiding "self" (ātman), which Buddhism
Buddhism
denies
[...More...]

"Mindstream" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

Bodymind
Bodymind is an approach to understand the relationship between the human body and mind in which they are seen as a single integrated unit. It attempts to address the mind–body problem and is in contrast to the traditions of mind–body dualism and dualism. In the field of alternative medicine, bodymind implies that:The body, mind, emotions, and spirit are dynamically interrelated.[1] Experience, including physical stress, emotional injury, and pleasures are stored in the body's cells which in turn affects one's reactions to stimuli.[2]The term can be applied across a number of disciplines, including:Psychoneuroimmunology, the study of the interaction between psychological processes and the nervous and immune systems of the human body.[3] Body psychotherapy,[4][5][6][7] a branch of psychotherapy[8] which applies basic principles of somatic psychology
[...More...]

"Bodymind" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Indian Elephant
The Indian elephant
Indian elephant
( Elephas
Elephas
maximus indicus) is one of three recognized subspecies of the Asian elephant
Asian elephant
and native to mainland Asia. Since 1986, Elephas
Elephas
maximus has been listed as Endangered on the IUCN Red List
IUCN Red List
as the wild Asian elephant
Asian elephant
population has declined by at least 50% since the 1940s to 1930s, i.e
[...More...]

"Indian Elephant" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Indian Peafowl
The Indian peafowl
Indian peafowl
or blue peafowl (Pavo cristatus), a large and brightly coloured bird, is a species of peafowl native to South Asia, but introduced in many other parts of the world. The male, or peacock, is predominantly blue with a fan-like crest of spatula-tipped wire-like feathers and is best known for the long train made up of elongated upper-tail covert feathers which bear colourful eyespots. These stiff feathers are raised into a fan and quivered in a display during courtship. Despite the length and size of these covert feathers, peacocks are still capable of flight. Peahens lack the train, and have a greenish lower neck and duller brown plumage. The Indian peafowl
Indian peafowl
lives mainly on the ground in open forest or on land under cultivation where they forage for berries, grains but also prey on snakes, lizards, and small rodents
[...More...]

"Indian Peafowl" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Horse
at least 48 publishedThe horse (Equus ferus caballus)[2][3] is one of two extant subspecies of Equus ferus. It is an odd-toed ungulate mammal belonging to the taxonomic family Equidae. The horse has evolved over the past 45 to 55 million years from a small multi-toed creature, Eohippus, into the large, single-toed animal of today. Humans began to domesticate horses around 4000 BC, and their domestication is believed to have been widespread by 3000 BC. Horses in the subspecies caballus are domesticated, although some domesticated populations live in the wild as feral horses. These feral populations are not true wild horses, as this term is used to describe horses that have never been domesticated, such as the endangered Przewalski's horse, a separate subspecies, and the only remaining true wild horse
[...More...]

"Horse" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Snow Lion
The Snow Lion, sometimes also Snowlion (Tibetan: གངས་སེང་གེ་, Wylie: gangs seng ge; Chinese: 瑞獅; pinyin: ruìshī), is a celestial animal of Tibet. It is the emblem of Tibet, representing the snowy mountain ranges and glaciers of Tibet,[1] and may also symbolize power and strength, and fearlessness and joy, east and the earth element.[2][3] It is one of the Four Dignities.[4] It ranges over the mountains, and is commonly pictured as being white with a turquoise mane.Contents1 As national emblem of Tibet 2 In Tibetan culture2.1 Snow Lioness milk 2.2 Snow Lion
Snow Lion
Dance3 In Buddhist art 4 Attributes4.1 Roar5 Tibetan Lion Dog 6 See also 7 References 8 External linksAs national emblem of Tibet[edit]The Flag of Tibet, in use between 1912 and 1950
[...More...]

"Snow Lion" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Thoughtform
Tulpa
Tulpa
is a concept in mysticism and the paranormal of a being or object which is created through spiritual or mental powers.[1] It was adapted by 20th century theosophists from Tibetan sprul-pa (Tibetan: སྤྲུལ་པ་, Wylie: sprulpa) which means "emanation" or "manifestation".[2] Modern practitioners use the term to refer to a type of willed imaginary friend which practitioners consider to be sentient and relatively autonomous.[3]Contents1 Emanation body1.1 Indian Buddhism 1.2 Tibetan Buddhism2 Tulpa2.1 Alexandra David-Néel 2.2 Thoughtform3 Tulpas in mod
[...More...]

"Thoughtform" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

Archetype
The concept of an archetype /ˈɑːrkɪtaɪp/ appears in areas relating to behavior, modern psychological theory, and literary analysis. An archetype can be:a statement, pattern of behavior, or prototype (model) which other statements, patterns of behavior, and objects copy or emulate. (Frequently used informal synonyms for this usage include "standard example", "basic example", and the longer form "archetypal example". Mathematical archetypes often appear as "canonical examples".) a Platonic philosophical idea referring to pure forms which embody the fundamental characteristics of a thing in Platonism a collectively-inherited unconscious idea, pattern of thought, image, etc., that is universally present, in individual psyches, as in Jungian psychology a constantly recurring symbol or motif in literature, painting, or mythology (this usage of the term draws from both comparative anthropology and from Jungian archetypal theory)
[...More...]

"Archetype" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

Simulacra
A simulacrum (plural: simulacra from Latin: simulacrum, which means "likeness, similarity") is a representation or imitation of a person or thing.[1] The word was first recorded in the English language in the late 16th century, used to describe a representation, such as a statue or a painting, especially of a god. By the late 19th century, it had gathered a secondary association of inferiority: an image without the substance or qualities of the original.[2] Philosopher Fredric Jameson offers photorealism as an example of artistic simulacrum, where a painting is sometimes created by copying a photograph that is itself a copy of the real.[3] Other art forms that play with simulacra include trompe-l'œil,[4] pop art, Italian neorealism, and French New Wave.[3]Contents1 Philosophy 2 Literature, film, television, and music2.1 Artificial beings 2.2 Simulated environments2.2.1 Film 2.2.2 TV series 2.2.3 Music2.3 Philip K
[...More...]

"Simulacra" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Rubin Museum Of Art
Bus: M1, M2, M3, M7, M14A, M14D, M20, M55 Subway:14th Street PATH 14th Street – Eighth Avenue ​ ​​ 14th Street – Union Square ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ 14th Street / Sixth Avenue ​ ​​ ​​ 18th Street ​Website rubinmuseum.orgThe Rubin Museum of Art
Rubin Museum of Art
is a museum dedicated to the collection, display, and preservation of the art and cultures of the Himalayas, India and neighboring regions, with a permanent collection focused particularly on Tibetan art
[...More...]

"Rubin Museum Of Art" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse
.