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TV Programmes
A television show is a series of related productions intended for broadcast on over-the-air, cable television or Internet television, other than a commercial, trailer or any other segment of content not serving as attraction for viewership. More rarely, it may be a single production, also called a television program (British English: programme). A limited number of episodes of a television show may be called a miniseries or a serial or limited series. A television series is without a fixed length and are usually divided into seasons (U.S. and Canada) or series (UK), yearly or semiannual sets of new episodes. While there is no defined length, U.S. industry practice has traditionally favored longer television seasons than those of other countries. A one-time broadcast may be called a "special" or particularly in the UK a "special episode"
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Broadcast Programming
Broadcast
Broadcast
programming is the practice of organizing and/or ordering of broadcast media programs (Internet, television, radio, etc. ) in a daily, weekly, monthly, quarterly or season-long schedule. Modern broadcasters use broadcast automation to regularly change the scheduling of their programs to build an audience for a new show, retain that audience, or compete with other broadcasters' programs. In the United Kingdom, this is known as TV listings. Television
Television
scheduling strategies are employed to give programs the best possible chance of attracting and retaining an audience
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Concept
Concepts are the fundamental building blocks of our thoughts and beliefs. They play an important role in all aspects of cognition.[1][2]When the mind makes a generalization such as the concept of tree, it extracts similarities from numerous examples; the simplification enables higher-level thinking.Concepts arise as abstractions or generalisations from experience; from the result of a transformation of existing ideas; or from innate properties.[3][unreliable source?] A concept is instantiated (reified) by all of its actual or potential instances, whether these are things in the real world or other ideas. Concepts are studied as components of human cognition in the cognitive science disciplines of linguistics, psychology and philosophy, where an ongoing debate asks whether all cognition must occur through concepts
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Actor
An actor (often actress for females; see terminology) is a person who portrays a character in a performance. The actor performs "in the flesh" in the traditional medium of the theatre or in modern mediums such as film, radio, and television. The analogous Greek term is ὑποκριτής (hupokritḗs), literally "one who answers".[1] The actor's interpretation of their role pertains to the role played, whether based on a real person or fictional character
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Soap Opera
A soap opera is an ongoing, episodic work of fiction presented in serial format on television, radio and in novels, featuring the lives of many characters and focusing on emotional relationships to the point of melodrama.[1] The term soap opera originated from radio dramas being sponsored by soap manufacturers.[2] In the United Kingdom, BBC Radio
Radio
started to broadcast The Archers
The Archers
in May 1950
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Story Arc
A story arc (also narrative arc)[1] is an extended or continuing storyline in episodic storytelling media such as television, comic books, comic strips, boardgames, video games, and films with each episode following a dramatic arc. On a television program, for example, the story would unfold over many episodes. In television, the use of the story arc is much more common in comedies, especially in soap operas. In a traditional Hollywood film, the story arc usually follows a three-act format.[2] Webcomics are more likely to use story arcs than newspaper comics, as most web comics have readable archives online that a newcomer to the strip can read in order to understand what is going on. Although story arcs have existed for decades, the term "story arc" was coined in 1988 in relation to the television series Wiseguy,[clarification needed][3] and was quickly adapted for other uses. Many American comic book series are now written in four or six-issue arcs, within a continuing series
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Episode
An episode is a coherent narrative unit within a larger dramatic work, such as a film or television series. The word derives from the Greek term (Ancient Greek: ἐπεισόδιον) (epeisodion), meaning the material contained between two songs or odes in a Greek tragedy.Contents1 Description 2 Etymology 3 See also 4 ReferencesDescription[edit] An episode is a coherent narrative unit within a larger dramatic work. It is frequently used to describe units of television or radio series. An episode is to a sequence as a chapter is to a book
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Hill Street Blues
Hill Street Blues
Hill Street Blues
is an American serial police drama that aired on NBC in primetime from 1981 to 1987 for a total of 146 episodes.[1] The show chronicled the lives of the staff of a single police station located on the fictional Hill Street, in an unnamed large city, with "blues" being a slang term for police officers for their blue uniforms. The show received critical acclaim, and its production innovations influenced many subsequent dramatic television series produced in the United States
United States
and Canada. Its debut season was rewarded with eight Emmy Awards, a debut season record surpassed only by The West Wing
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St. Elsewhere
St. Elsewhere
St. Elsewhere
is an American medical drama television series that originally ran on NBC
NBC
from October 26, 1982, to May 25, 1988. The series starred Ed Flanders, Norman Lloyd
Norman Lloyd
and William Daniels
William Daniels
as teaching doctors at an aging, underrated Boston
Boston
hospital who give interns a promising future in making critical medical and life decisions. The series was produced by MTM Enterprises, which had success with a similar NBC
NBC
series, the police drama Hill Street Blues, during that same time; both series were often compared to each other for their use of ensemble casts and overlapping serialized storylines (an original ad for St. Elsewhere
St. Elsewhere
quoted a critic that called the series "'Hill Street Blues' in a hospital"). St. Elsewhere
St

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Babylon 5
Babylon 5 is an American science fiction television series created by writer and producer J. Michael Straczynski, under the Babylonian Productions label, in association with Straczynski's Synthetic Worlds Ltd. and Warner Bros.
Warner Bros.
Domestic Television. After the successful airing of a test pilot movie on February 22, 1993, Babylon 5: The Gathering, in May 1993 Warner Brothers commissioned the series for production as part of its Prime Time Entertainment Network
Prime Time Entertainment Network
(PTEN).[1] The first season premiered in the US on January 26, 1994, and the series ultimately ran for the intended five seasons
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Steven Soderbergh
Steven Andrew Soderbergh (/ˈsoʊdərbɜːrɡ/; born January 14, 1963) is an American filmmaker, producer, and screenwriter. His indie drama Sex, Lies, and Videotape
Sex, Lies, and Videotape
(1989) won the Palme d'Or
Palme d'Or
at the Cannes Film Festival, making the then-26-year-old Soderbergh the youngest solo director to win the festival's top award,[1] and became a worldwide commercial success
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Television Production
A television show is a series of related productions intended for broadcast on over-the-air, cable television or Internet television, other than a commercial, trailer or any other segment of content not serving as attraction for viewership. More rarely, it may be a single production, also called a television program (British English: programme). A limited number of episodes of a television show may be called a miniseries or a serial or limited series. A television series is without a fixed length and are usually divided into seasons (U.S. and Canada) or series (UK), yearly or semiannual sets of new episodes. While there is no defined length, U.S. industry practice has traditionally favored longer television seasons than those of other countries. A one-time broadcast may be called a "special" or particularly in the UK a "special episode"
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Fictional Character
A character (sometimes known as a fictional character) is a person or other being in a narrative (such as a novel, play, television series, film, or video game).[1][2][3] The character may be entirely fictional or based on a real-life person, in which case the distinction of a "fictional" versus "real" character may be made.[2] Derived from the ancient Greek word χαρακτήρ, the English word dates from the Restoration,[4] although it became widely used after its appearance in Tom Jones in 1749.[5][6] From this, the sense of "a part played by an actor" developed.[6] Character, particularly when enacted by an actor in the theatre or cinema, involves "the illusion of being a human person."[7] In literature, characters guide readers through their stories, helping them to understand plots and ponder themes.[8] Since the end of the 18th century, the phrase "in character" has been used to describe an effective impersonation by an actor.[6] Since the 19th century, the art of creating cha
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Terrestrial Television
Terrestrial television
Terrestrial television
or broadcast television is a type of television broadcasting in which the television signal is transmitted by radio waves from the terrestrial (Earth based) transmitter of a television station to a TV receiver having an antenna. The term is more common in Europe, while in North America
North America
it is referred to as broadcast television or sometimes over-the-air television (OTA)
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Television Crew
Television crew
Television crew
positions are derived from those of film crew, but with several differences.Contents1 Before-Production1.1 Casting director 1.2 Director 1.3 Location manager 1.4 Make-up artist 1.5 Production designer 1.6 Researcher 1.7 Set designer 1.8 Television producer 1.9 Writer 1.10 Head writer 1.11 Screenwriter 1.12 Story editor2 Production2.1 A2 2.2 Boom operator 2.3 Camera operator/cinematographer/videographer 2.4
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Television Network
A television network is a telecommunications network for distribution of television program content, whereby a central operation provides programming to many television stations or pay television providers. Until the mid-1980s, television programming in most countries of the world was dominated by a small number of broadcast networks
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