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TOPS
Total Operations Processing System, or TOPS, is a computer system for managing the locomotives and rolling stock (railroad cars) owned by and/or operated on a rail system. It was originally developed by the American-based Southern Pacific Railroad
Southern Pacific Railroad
and was widely sold; it is best known in Britain for its use by British Rail
British Rail
(BR) and its successors.Contents1 Early development 2 Adoption by British Rail2.1 TOPS
TOPS
numbering under British Rail3 Recent history 4 Sample output 5 ReferencesEarly development[edit] The Southern Pacific Railroad
Southern Pacific Railroad
was ahead of the pack in its embracing of technology. In the early 1960s, it developed a computer system called 'Total Operations Processing System', or 'TOPS'
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Over And Wharton Railway Station
Over and Wharton railway station was one of three railway stations serving the town of Winsford in Cheshire
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Electric Multiple Unit
An electric multiple unit or EMU is a multiple unit train consisting of self-propelled carriages, using electricity as the motive power. An EMU requires no separate locomotive, as electric traction motors are incorporated within one or a number of the carriages. An EMU is usually formed of two or more semi-permanently coupled carriages, but electrically powered single-unit railcars are also generally classed as EMUs. EMUs are popular on commuter and suburban rail networks around the world due to their fast acceleration and pollution-free operation.[1] Being quieter than diesel multiple units (DMU) and locomotive-drawn trains, EMUs can operate later at night and more frequently without disturbing nearby residents
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Multiple Unit
A multiple-unit train or simply multiple unit (MU) is a self-propelled train composed of one or more carriages joined together, which when coupled to another multiple unit can be controlled by a single driver.[1] Although most multiple units consist of several carriages, single self-propelled carriages (also called railcars, rail motor coaches or railbuses) are multiple-units if they are capable of operating with others. Multiple units are classified by their power source and are of two main types: electric multiple unit (EMU) or diesel multiple unit (DMU)
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International Standard Book Number
"ISBN" redirects here. For other uses, see ISBN (other).International Standard Book
Book
NumberA 13-digit ISBN, 978-3-16-148410-0, as represented by an EAN-13 bar codeAcronym ISBNIntroduced 1970; 48 years ago (1970)Managing organisation International ISBN AgencyNo. of digits 13 (formerly 10)Check digit Weighted sumExample 978-3-16-148410-0Website www.isbn-international.orgThe International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a unique[a][b] numeric commercial book identifier. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each edition and variation (except reprintings) of a book. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book would each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is 13 digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007, and 10 digits long if assigned before 2007
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Electric Locomotive
An electric locomotive is a locomotive powered by electricity from overhead lines, a third rail or on-board energy storage such as a battery or a supercapacitor. Electric locomotives with on-board fueled prime movers, such as diesel engines or gas turbines, are classed as diesel-electric or gas turbine-electric and not as electric locomotives, because the electric generator/motor combination serves only as a power transmission system. Electric locomotives benefit from the high efficiency of electric motors, often above 90% (not including the inefficiency of generating the electricity). Additional efficiency can be gained from regenerative braking, which allows kinetic energy to be recovered during braking to put power back on the line. Newer electric locomotives use AC motor-inverter drive systems that provide for regenerative braking. Electric locomotives are quiet compared to diesel locomotives since there is no engine and exhaust noise and less mechanical noise
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Oxford
Oxford
Oxford
(/ˈɒksfərd/)[3][4] is a city in the South East region of England
England
and the county town of Oxfordshire. With an estimated 2016 population of 170,350, it is the 52nd largest city in the United Kingdom,[5][6] and one of the fastest growing and most ethnically diverse.[7][8] The city is situated 57 miles (92 km) from London, 69 miles (111 km) from Bristol, 65 miles (105 km) from both Southampton
Southampton
and Birmingham
Birmingham
and 25 miles (40 km) from Reading. The city is known worldwide as the home of the University of Oxford, the oldest university in the English-speaking world.[9] Buildings in Oxford
Oxford
demonstrate notable examples of every English architectural period since the late Saxon period. Oxford
Oxford
is known as the "city of dreaming spires", a term coined by poet Matthew Arnold
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Berkshire
Berkshire
Berkshire
(/ˈbɑːrkʃər/, abbreviated Berks, in the 17th century sometimes spelled Barkeshire as it is pronounced) is a county in south east England, west of London
London
and is one of the home counties. It was recognised by the Queen as the Royal County of Berkshire
Berkshire
in 1957 because of the presence of Windsor Castle, and letters patent were issued in 1974.[2][3] Berkshire
Berkshire
is a county of historic origin and is a home county, a ceremonial county and a non-metropolitan county without a county council. The historic boundary to the north of Berkshire
Berkshire
follows the River Thames, from Buscot
Buscot
to Old Windsor
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Diesel Multiple Unit
A diesel multiple unit or DMU is a multiple-unit train powered by on-board diesel engines. A DMU requires no separate locomotive, as the engines are incorporated into one or more of the carriages. Diesel-powered single-unit railcars are also generally classed as DMUs
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Third Rail
A third rail is a method of providing electric power to a railway locomotive or train, through a semi-continuous rigid conductor placed alongside or between the rails of a railway track. It is used typically in a mass transit or rapid transit system, which has alignments in its own corridors, fully or almost fully segregated from the outside environment
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992 album by Vesta Williams "Special" (Garbage song), 1998 "Special
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Thameslink Programme
The Thameslink
Thameslink
Programme, originally Thameslink
Thameslink
2000, is a £6 billion project in south-east England to upgrade and expand the Thameslink rail network to provide new and longer trains between a wider range of stations to the north and to the south of London. The development will facilitate cross-London journeys, where passengers will no longer be required to change trains in London. Work includes platform lengthening, station remodelling, new railway infrastructure, and additional rolling stock. The project was originally proposed in 1991 following the successful introduction of the initial Thameslink service in 1988. After many delays, planning permission was granted in 2006 and funding was approved in October 2007. Work started in 2009 and is expected to be complete in 2018
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Reading West Railway Station
Reading West is a railway station in Reading, England. It is in West Reading, about 1 mile (1.6 km) west from the town's main retail and commercial areas. The station is served by local services operated by Great Western Railway. To the north of the station the line crosses a railway bridge over the Oxford Road, followed by Oxford Road Junction, which is the southern apex of a triangle of tracks. The tracks to the west curve round to join the Great Western Main Line towards Bristol at Reading West Junction, and are largely used by freight trains between Southampton Docks and points to the north. The tracks to the east lead to Reading station and are mostly used by passenger services
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Intercity Express Programme
The Intercity Express Programme
Intercity Express Programme
is an initiative of the Department for Transport (DfT) in the United Kingdom to procure new trains to replace the InterCity 125
InterCity 125
and InterCity 225
InterCity 225
fleets on the East Coast Main Line and Great Western Main Line. There are to be two variants: the Class 800, electric/diesel-electric hybrids, and the Class 801 electrics. On 12 February 2009, the DfT announced that Agility Trains, a consortium led by Hitachi, was the preferred bidder, with a train named the Hitachi
Hitachi
Super Express
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Coach (rail)
A passenger car (known as a coach or carriage in the UK, and also known as a bogie in India[1]) is a piece of railway rolling stock that is designed to carry passengers. The term passenger car can also be associated with a sleeping car, baggage, dining, railway post office and prisoner transport cars. In some countries, such as the UK, some coaching stock (whether designed, converted or adapted) to not carry passengers are referred to as "NPCS" ( non=passenger coaching stock); similarly some maintenance (engineering) stock can be known as "MOW" - maintenance of way - in the US.Contents1 History1.1 19th century: First passenger cars and early development 1.2 1900-1950: Lighter materials, new car types 1.3 1950-present: High-technology advancements 1.4 Heavyweight vs
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Text Terminal
A computer terminal is an electronic or electromechanical hardware device that is used for entering data into, and displaying or printing data from, a computer or a computing system.[1] The teletype was an example of an early day hardcopy terminal,[2], and predated the use of a computer screen by decades.[3] Early terminals were inexpensive devices but very slow compared to punched cards or paper tape for input, but as the technology improved and video displays were introduced, terminals pushed these older forms of interaction from the industry. A related development was timesharing systems, which evolved in parallel and made up for any inefficiencies of the user's typing ability with the ability to support multiple users on the same machine, each at their own terminal. The function of a terminal is confined to display and input of data; a device with significant local programmable data processing capability may be called a "smart terminal" or fat client
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