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TGV
The TGV
TGV
(French: Train à Grande Vitesse, "high-speed train") is France's intercity high-speed rail service, operated by the SNCF, the national rail operator. It was developed in the 1970s by GEC-Alsthom and the SNCF. Originally designed as turbotrains to be powered by gas turbines, TGV
TGV
prototypes evolved into electric trains with the 1973 oil crisis
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Government Of France
The Government of the French Republic
French Republic
(French: Gouvernement de la République française) exercises executive power in France. It is composed of a prime minister, who is the head of government, and both junior and senior ministers.[1] Senior ministers are titled as Ministers (French: Ministres), whereas junior ministers are titled as Secretaries of State (French: Secrétaires d'État). A smaller and more powerful executive body, called the Council of Ministers (French: Conseil des ministres), is composed only of the senior ministers, though some Secretaries of State may attend Council meetings
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Rail Transport Operations
A railway has two major components: the rolling stock (the locomotives, passenger coaches, freight cars, etc.) and the infrastructure (the permanent way, tracks, stations, freight facilities, viaducts, tunnels, etc.).Contents1 Operation 2 Intrinsic factors2.1 Signalling 2.2 Types of rail system 2.3 Permanent way
Permanent way
and railroad construction 2.4 Types of vehicle 2.5 Passenger operations 2.6 Freight
Freight
operations 2.7 Locomotive
Locomotive
operations 2.8 Maintenance of way
Maintenance of way
operations3 Background factors (feasibility) 4 Extrinsic factors4.1 Physical geography 4.2 Human geography 4.3 Historical factors5 ReferencesOperation[edit]Two British Rail Class 143
British Rail Class 143
DMUs at Cardiff Queen Street station in the United Kingdom
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Commuting
Commuting
Commuting
is periodically recurring travel between one's place of residence and place of work, or study, and in doing so exceed the boundary of their residential community[1]. It sometimes refers to any regular or often repeated traveling between locations, even when not work-related. A distinction is also often made between commuters who commute daily or weekly between their residence to work place, and are therefore considered respectively local or long-distance commuters.Contents1 History 2 Suburbs 3 Gender differences 4 Education 5 Traffic 6 Pollution 7 Commuting
Commuting
trends in the United States 8 See also 9 References 10 External linksHistory[edit] The word commuter derives from early days of rail travel in US cities such as New York, Philadelphia, Boston and Chicago, where, in the 1840s, the railways engendered suburbs from which travellers paying a reduced or 'commuted' fare into the city
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Shijiazhuang–Wuhan High-speed Railway
Shiwu passenger railway (simplified Chinese: 石武客运专线; traditional Chinese: 石武客運專線; pinyin: Shíwǔ Kèyùn Zhuān Xiàn) is an 840 km high-speed rail line between Shijiazhuang and Wuhan in China. It has been under construction since October 2008. The total investment is 116.76 billion yuan. The design speed is 350 km/h (220 mph)
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Zhengzhou
Zhengzhou
Zhengzhou
is a Chinese city and the provincial capital of Henan Province in Central China.[2] It is one of the Chinese Eight Central Cities, which also serves as the political, economic, technological, and educational center of the province, as well as a major transportation hub of China
China
(highway, railway, aviation, communication)[3]. The Great Zhengzhou
Zhengzhou
Metropolitan Area (including Zhengzhou, Kaifeng) is the kernel of Chinese Central Plains Economic Region [4][5]. Zhengzhou
Zhengzhou
is a Chinese National Civilized City [6], the State-list Famous Historical and Culture City[7], one of the Eight Ancient Capital Cities, one of the significant birthplace of Chinese Civilization[8], birthplace of the Yellow Emperor[9]. Historically, Zhengzhou
Zhengzhou
was the capital of China
China
for thousand years (five times)[10]
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Rail Transport In Luxembourg
The Société Nationale des Chemins de Fer Luxembourgeois (Luxembourg National Railway Company, abbreviated CFL) is the national railway company of Luxembourg. In 2013, it carried approximately 20.7 million passengers and 804 million tonnes kilometers of goods. The company employs 3,090 people, making CFL the country's seventh-largest corporate employer.[2] The Luxembourg rail system comprises 275 route-kilometres, of which 140 km is double track and 135 km single track. Of the total track length of 617 km, 574 km are electrified. The majority of the electrified track (526 km) is operated at 25 kV, 50 Hz, though some 48 km are run at 3 kV DC. Luxembourg borders Belgium, France and Germany. Correspondingly, there are cross-border services into these countries. Some are wholly run by CFL, whereas others are run by SNCF, NMBS/SNCB and DB
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Shijiazhuang
Shijiazhuang
Shijiazhuang
([ʂɨ̌.tɕjá.ʈʂwáŋ]; Chinese: 石家庄) is the capital and largest city of North China's Hebei
Hebei
Province.[1] Administratively a prefecture-level city, it is about 263 kilometres (163 mi) southwest of Beijing,[2] and it administers eight districts, two county-level cities, and 12 counties. As of 2015 it had a total population of 10,701,600[3] with 4,303,700 in the central (or metro) area comprising the seven districts and the county of Zhengding
Zhengding
largely conurbated with the Shijiazhuang metropolitan area as urbanization continues to proliferate.[4] Shijiazhuang's total population ranked twelfth in mainland China.[5] Shijiazhuang
Shijiazhuang
experienced dramatic growth after the founding of the People's Republic of China
China
in 1949
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Railway Gazette International
Railway
Railway
Gazette International is a monthly business journal covering the railway, metro, light rail and tram industries worldwide. Available by annual subscription, the magazine is read in over 140 countries by transport professionals and decision makers, railway managers, engineers, consultants and suppliers to the rail industry.[2] A mix of technical, commercial and geographical feature articles, plus the regular monthly news pages, cover developments in all aspects of the rail industry, including infrastructure, operations, rolling stock and signalling. History[edit]
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1973 Oil Crisis
The 1973 oil crisis
1973 oil crisis
began in October 1973 when the members of the Organization of Arab Petroleum Exporting Countries
Organization of Arab Petroleum Exporting Countries
proclaimed an oil embargo. The embargo was targeted at nations perceived as supporting Israel
Israel
during the Yom Kippur
Yom Kippur
War.[1] The initial nations targeted were Canada, Japan, the Netherlands, the United Kingdom
United Kingdom
and the United States with the embargo also later extended to Portugal, Rhodesia
Rhodesia
and South Africa. By the end of the embargo in March 1974,[2] the price of oil had risen from US$3 per barrel to nearly $12 globally; US prices were significantly higher
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Track Gauge
North America · South America · Europe · Australiav t ePart of a series onRail transportOperations Track Maintenance High-speed railways Track gauge Stations Trains Locomotives Rolling stock Companies History Attractions Terminology (AU, NA, NZ, UK) By country Accidents Railway couplings Couplers by country Coupler conversion Track gauge Variable gauge Gauge conversion Dual gauge Wheelset Bogie
Bogie
(truck) Dual coupling Rail subsidiesModellingv t eIn rail transport, track gauge is the spacing of the rails on a railway track and is measured between the inner faces of the load-bearing rails. All vehicles on a rail network must have running gear that is compatible with the track gauge, and in the earliest days of railways the selection of a proposed railway's gauge was a key issue
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Standard Gauge
North America · South America · Europe · Australiav t eA standard-gauge railway is a railway with a track gauge of 1,435 mm (4 ft 8 1⁄2 in). The standard gauge is also called Stephenson gauge after George Stephenson, International gauge, UIC gauge, uniform gauge, normal gauge and European gauge in the EU and Russia.[1][2][3][4][5] It is the most widely used railway track gauge across the world with approximately 55% of the lines in the world using it. All high-speed rail lines, except those in Russia, Finland, Portugal and Uzbekistan, utilise standard gauge
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Gas Turbine
A gas turbine, also called a combustion turbine, is a type of continuous combustion, internal combustion engine. There are three main components:An upstream rotating gas compressor; A downstream turbine on the same shaft; A combustion chamber or area, called a combustor, in between 1. and 2. above.A fourth component is often used to increase efficiency (turboprop, turbofan), to convert power into mechanical or electric form (turboshaft, electric generator), or to achieve greater power to mass/volume ratio (afterburner). The basic operation of the gas turbine is a Brayton cycle
Brayton cycle
with air as the working fluid. Fresh atmospheric air flows through the compressor that brings it to higher pressure. Energy
Energy
is then added by spraying fuel into the air and igniting it so the combustion generates a high-temperature flow
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Rennes
1 French Land Register data, which excludes lakes, ponds, glaciers > 1 km2 (0.386 sq mi or 247 acres) and river estuaries. 2 Population without double counting: residents of multiple communes (e.g., students and military personnel) only counted once. Rennes
Rennes
(French pronunciation: [ʁɛn]; Breton: Roazhon, Breton pronunciation: [ˈrwaːzən]; Gallo: Resnn; Latin: Condate Redonum) is a city in the east of Brittany
Brittany
in northwestern France
France
at the confluence of the Ille
Ille
and the Vilaine. Rennes
Rennes
is the capital of the region of Brittany, as well as the Ille-et-Vilaine
Ille-et-Vilaine
department. Rennes's history goes back more than 2,000 years, at a time when it was a small Gallic village named Condate
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Marseille
1 French Land Register data, which excludes lakes, ponds, glaciers > 1 km2 (0.386 sq mi or 247 acres) and river estuaries. 2 Population without double counting: residents of multiple communes (e.g., students and military personnel) only counted once. Marseille
Marseille
(/mɑːrˈseɪ/; French: [maʁsɛj] ( listen), locally [mɑχˈsɛjə]; Provençal: Marselha [maʀˈsejɔ, -ˈsijɔ]), also known in British English
British English
as Marseilles, is the second-largest city of France
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Lille
1 French Land Register data, which excludes lakes, ponds, glaciers > 1 km2 (0.386 sq mi or 247 acres) and river estuaries. 2 Population without double counting: residents of multiple communes (e.g., students and military personnel) only counted once. Lille
Lille
(French pronunciation: [lil] ( listen); Dutch: Rijsel pronounced [ˈrɛi̯səl]; West Flemish: Rysel) is a city at the northern tip of France, in French Flanders
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