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T.E. Lawrence
First World WarArab Revolt Siege of Medina Battle of Aqaba Capture of Damascus Battle of MegiddoAwards Companion of the Order of the Bath[1] Distinguished Service Order[2] Knight of the Legion of Honour
Legion of Honour
(France)[3] Croix de guerre (France)[4]Thomas Edward Lawrence, CB, DSO (16 August 1888 – 19 May 1935) was a British archaeologist, military officer, diplomat, and writer. He was renowned for his liaison role during the Sinai and Palestine Campaign and the Arab Revolt
Arab Revolt
against the Ottoman Empire
Ottoman Empire
during the First World War
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Leonard Woolley
Sir Charles Leonard Woolley
Leonard Woolley
(17 April 1880 – 20 February 1960) was a British archaeologist best known for his excavations at Ur in Mesopotamia. He is recognized as one of the first ‘modern’ archaeologists, who excavated in a methodical way, keeping careful records, and using them to reconstruct ancient life and history.[1] Woolley was knighted in 1935 for his contributions to the discipline of archaeology.[2]Contents1 Early life 2 Career2.1 Excavation at Ur 2.2 Local Genesis flood theory 2.3 World War II3 Personal life 4 Bibliography 5 References5.1 Sources6 External linksEarly life[edit] Woolley was the son of a clergyman, and was brother to Geoffrey Harold Woolley, VC, and George Cathcart Woolley. He was born at 13 Southwold Road, Upper Clapton, in the modern London Borough of Hackney[3] and educated at St John's School, Leatherhead
St John's School, Leatherhead
and New College, Oxford
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Westmeath
County Westmeath (/wɛstˈmiːð/ west-MEEDH; Irish: Contae na hIarmhí or simply An Iarmhí) is a county in Ireland. It is in the province of Leinster and is part of the Midlands Region. It originally formed part of the historic Kingdom of Meath (Midhe 'middle'). It was named Mide because the kingdom was located in the geographical centre of Ireland (the word Mide meant 'middle').[1] Westmeath County Council is the administrative body for the county, and the county town is Mullingar
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Oxford
Oxford
Oxford
(/ˈɒksfərd/)[3][4] is a city in the South East region of England
England
and the county town of Oxfordshire. With an estimated 2016 population of 170,350, it is the 52nd largest city in the United Kingdom,[5][6] and one of the fastest growing and most ethnically diverse.[7][8] The city is situated 57 miles (92 km) from London, 69 miles (111 km) from Bristol, 65 miles (105 km) from both Southampton
Southampton
and Birmingham
Birmingham
and 25 miles (40 km) from Reading. The city is known worldwide as the home of the University of Oxford, the oldest university in the English-speaking world.[9] Buildings in Oxford
Oxford
demonstrate notable examples of every English architectural period since the late Saxon period. Oxford
Oxford
is known as the "city of dreaming spires", a term coined by poet Matthew Arnold
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Jesus College, Oxford
Jesus
Jesus
College (in full: Jesus
Jesus
College in the University of Oxford
University of Oxford
of Queen Elizabeth's Foundation) is one of the colleges of the University of Oxford
Oxford
in England. It is in the centre of the city, on a site between Turl Street, Ship Street, Cornmarket Street
Cornmarket Street
and Market Street. The college was founded by Elizabeth I on 27 June 1571 for the education of clergy, though students now study a broad range of secular subjects. A major driving force behind the establishment of the college was Hugh Price (or Ap Rhys), a churchman from Brecon
Brecon
in Wales. The oldest buildings, in the first quadrangle, date from the 16th and early 17th centuries; a second quadrangle was added between about 1640 and about 1713, and a third quadrangle was built in about 1906
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Carchemish
Carchemish
Carchemish
(/kɑːrˈkɛmɪʃ/ kar-KEM-ish), also spelled Karkemish (Hittite: Karkamiš;[1] Turkish: Karkamış; Greek: Εὔρωπος; Latin: Europus), was an important ancient capital in the northern part of the region of Syria. At times during its history the city was independent, but it was also part of the Mitanni, Hittite and Neo-Assyrian Empires. Today it is on the frontier between Turkey
Turkey
and Syria. It was the location of an important battle, about 605 BC, between the Babylonians and Egyptians, mentioned in the Bible
Bible
(Jer. 46:2)
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Syria
Coordinates: 35°N 38°E / 35°N 38°E / 35; 38Syrian Arab
Arab
Republic الجمهورية العربية السورية (Arabic) al-Jumhūrīyah al-ʻArabīyah as-SūrīyahFlagCoat of armsAnthem: "حماة الديار" (Arabic) Humat ad-Diyar Guardians of the HomelandCapital and largest city Damascus 33°30′N 36°18′E / 33.500°N 36.300°E / 33.500; 36.300Official languages ArabicEthnic groupsSyrian Arabs Arameans Kurds Turkomans Assyrians Circassians ArmeniansReligion 87% Islam 10% Christianity 3% Druzism[1]Government Unitary domina
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Faisal I Of Iraq
Faisal I bin Hussein bin Ali
Ali
al-Hashemi, (Arabic: فيصل بن الحسين بن علي الهاشمي‎, Fayṣal al-Awwal ibn al-Ḥusayn ibn ‘Alī al-Hāshimī; 20 May 1885[1][2] [5] – 8 September 1933) was King of the Arab Kingdom of Syria
Arab Kingdom of Syria
or Greater Syria in 1920, and was King of Iraq
King of Iraq
from 23 August 1921 to 1933. He was the third son of Hussein bin Ali, the Grand Sharif of Mecca, who had proclaimed himself King of the Arab lands in October 1916. Faisal fostered unity between Sunni and Shiite Muslims to encourage common loyalty and promote pan-Arabism in the goal of creating an Arab state that would include Iraq, Syria
Syria
and the rest of the Fertile Crescent
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Foreign And Commonwealth Office
The Foreign and Commonwealth Office
Foreign and Commonwealth Office
(FCO), commonly called the Foreign Office, is a department of the Government of the United Kingdom. It is responsible for protecting and promoting British interests worldwide. It was created in 1968 by merging the Foreign Office and the Commonwealth Office. The head of the FCO is the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, commonly abbreviated to "Foreign Secretary" (currently Boris Johnson, who took office on 13 July 2016)
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The Mint (book)
The Mint is a book written by T. E. Lawrence[a] and published posthumously. It describes his time in the Royal Air Force, working, despite having held senior rank in the army (colonel), as an ordinary aircraftman, under an assumed name, 352087 Ross. The book is notable, despite flaws noted by critics, for its sharp observation, for the insight it gives into Lawrence himself, and for the censorship issues around its publication. The novelist E. M. Forster
E. M. Forster
corresponded with Lawrence, in 1929 writing two detailed letters to him criticising The Mint, which he liked, and advising on how it might be improved.Contents1 The Mint 2 Self-censorship 3 Censorship 4 Reception 5 Notes 6 References 7 Further reading 8 External linksThe Mint[edit] The Mint concerns the period following the First World War
First World War
when Lawrence decided to disappear from public view
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City Of Oxford High School For Boys
The City of Oxford
Oxford
High School for Boys (a.k.a. Oxford
Oxford
High School for Boys and City of Oxford
Oxford
School) was founded in 1881 by Thomas Hill Green to provide Oxford
Oxford
boys with an education which would enable them to prepare for University.Contents1 History 2 The building 3 Inscription 4 The staff4.1 Headmasters5 School traditions 6 Legacy 7 Alumni 8 References 9 External linksHistory[edit] It was administered by the City of Oxford
Oxford
Education Committee, with around 400 boys enrolled
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Killua Castle
Killua Castle,[1] and the nearby Raleigh Obelisk, are situated near Clonmellon, County Westmeath, Ireland. The present house was built in about 1780 by Sir Benjamin Chapman and consisted of a hall, dining room, oval drawing room, breakfast parlour and front and back stairs. There was also a stable yard, barn and haggard. From here, the Chapmans administered the surrounding farm lands of some 9,000 acres (36 km2) in the 18th century. In a ruinous condition, it was renovated in 2006.[2]Contents1 History 2 Raleigh Obelisk 3 Other Westmeath castles 4 See also 5 References 6 External linksHistory[edit] Killua Castle
Killua Castle
and its surrounding lands were granted around 1667 to Benjamin Chapman, a captain in Cromwell's army, having been confiscated from the Knights Hospitallers of St. John. On his death the estate passed to his elder son, William, and on William's death in 1734 to his son Benjamin
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Kirkcudbright
Kirkcudbright, (/kərˈkuːbriː/ kirr-KOO-bree; Scottish Gaelic: Cille Chuithbeirt) is a town and parish in Kirkcudbrightshire, of which it is traditionally the county town, within Dumfries
Dumfries
and Galloway, Scotland. The town lies southwest of Castle Douglas
Castle Douglas
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Anglo-Irish People
Anglo-Irish
Anglo-Irish
(Irish: Angla-Éireannach) is a term which was more commonly used in the 19th and early 20th centuries to identify a social class in Ireland, whose members are mostly the descendants and successors of the English Protestant Ascendancy.[1] They mostly belong to the Anglican Church of Ireland, which was the established church of Ireland
Ireland
until 1871, or to a lesser extent one of the English dissenting churches, such as the Methodist
Methodist
church, though some were also Catholic
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Galloway
Galloway (Scottish Gaelic: Gall-Ghàidhealaibh, Latin: Gallovidia)[1] is a region in southwestern Scotland comprising the historic counties of Wigtownshire and Kirkcudbrightshire. A native or inhabitant of Galloway is called a Gallovidian[2][3] or a Galwegian.[4] The place name Galloway is derived from the Gaelic i nGall Gaidhealaib ("amongst the Gall Gaidheil").[5] The Gall Gaidheil, literally meaning "Stranger-Gaidheil", originally referred to a population of mixed Scandinavian and Gaelic ethnicity that inhabited Galloway in the Middle Ages. Galloway is bounded by sea to the west and south, the Galloway Hills to the north, and the River Nith to the east; the border between Kirkcudbright and Wigtown shires is marked by the River Cree
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Dinard
1 French Land Register data, which excludes lakes, ponds, glaciers > 1 km2 (0.386 sq mi or 247 acres) and river estuaries. 2 Population without double counting: residents of multiple communes (e.g., students and military personnel) only counted once. Dinard
Dinard
(Breton: Dinarzh, Gallo: Dinard) is a commune in the Ille-et-Vilaine
Ille-et-Vilaine
department in Brittany in northwestern France. Dinard
Dinard
is on the Côte d'Émeraude of Brittany. Its beaches and mild climate make it a popular holiday destination, and this has resulted in the town having a variety of famous visitors and residents
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