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Synthesizer
A synthesizer (often abbreviated as synth, also spelled synthesiser) is an electronic musical instrument that generates electric signals that are converted to sound through instrument amplifiers and loudspeakers or headphones. Synthesizers may either imitate traditional musical instruments like piano, Hammond organ, flute, vocals; natural sounds like ocean waves, etc.; or generate novel electronic timbres. They are often played with a musical keyboard, but they can be controlled via a variety of other input devices, including music sequencers, instrument controllers, fingerboards, guitar synthesizers, wind controllers, and electronic drums. Synthesizers without built-in controllers are often called sound modules, and are controlled via USB, MIDI
MIDI
or CV/gate using a controller device, often a MIDI
MIDI
keyboard or other controller. Synthesizers use various methods to generate electronic signals (sounds)
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Telegraph Line
An electrical telegraph is a telegraph that uses electrical signals, usually conveyed via dedicated telecommunication circuit or radio. The electrical telegraph, or more commonly just telegraph, superseded optical semaphore telegraph systems, thus becoming the first form of electrical telecommunications. In a matter of decades after their creation in the 1830s, electrical telegraph networks permitted people and commerce to transmit messages across both continents and oceans almost instantly, with widespread social and economic impacts.Contents1 History1.1 Early work 1.2 First working systems2 Commercial telegraphy2.1 Cooke and Wheatstone system 2.2 Morse system 2.3 Telegraphic improvements2.3.1 Teleprinters 2.3.2 Oceanic telegraph cables3 American Civil War 4 The harmonic telegraph 5 End of the telegraph era 6 See also 7 References 8 Bibliography 9 Further reading 10 External linksHistory[edit] Early work[edit]This section needs additional citations for verification
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Vocals
Singing
Singing
is the act of producing musical sounds with the voice and augments regular speech by the use of sustained tonality, rhythm, and a variety of vocal techniques. A person who sings is called a singer or vocalist. Singers perform music (arias, recitatives, songs, etc.) that can be sung with or without accompaniment by musical instruments. Singing
Singing
is often done in an ensemble of musicians, such as a choir of singers or a band of instrumentalists. Singers may perform as soloists or accompanied by anything from a single instrument (as in art song or some jazz styles) up to a symphony orchestra or big band
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Synth (other)
A synth or synthesizer is an electronic musical instrument. Synth
Synth
may also refer to: Video games[edit] Synth
Synth
(video game), a freeware strategic action game that utilizes procedurally generated graphics Synth, machines powered by
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USB
USB, short for Universal Serial Bus, is an industry standard that was developed to define cables, connectors and protocols for connection, communication, and power supply between personal computers and their peripheral devices. [3] USB
USB
was designed to standardize the connection of computer peripherals (including keyboards, pointing devices, digital cameras, printers, portable media players, disk drives and network adapters) to personal computers, both to communicate and to supply electric power. It has largely replaced interfaces such as serial ports and parallel ports, and has become commonplace on a wide range of devices
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Composer
A composer ( Latin
Latin
compōnō; literally "one who puts together") is a musician who is an author of music in any form, including vocal music (for a singer or choir), instrumental music, electronic music, and music which combines multiple forms. A composer may create music in any musical music genre, including, for example, classical music, musical theatre, blues, folk music, jazz, and popular music
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Wolfgang Von Kempelen's Speaking Machine
Wolfgang von Kempelen's speaking machine
Wolfgang von Kempelen's speaking machine
is a manually operated speech synthesizer that began development in 1769, by Austro-Hungarian author and inventor Wolfgang von Kempelen
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Rudolph Koenig
Karl Rudolph Koenig
Rudolph Koenig
(German: Rudolf Koenig; 26 November 1832 – 2 October 1901), known by himself and others as Rudolph Koenig, was a German physicist, chiefly concerned with acoustic phenomena.Contents1 Biography 2 References 3 External links 4 SourcesBiography[edit]Sound analyser with 8 resonator balls, by Koenig, 1880, Teylers Instrument RoomKoenig was born in Königsberg
Königsberg
(Province of Prussia), and studied at the University of Königsberg
Königsberg
in his native town. About 1852 he went to Paris, and became apprentice to the famous violin-maker, Jean Baptiste Vuillaume
Jean Baptiste Vuillaume
(1798-1875), and some six years later he started business on his own account. He called himself a "maker of musical instruments," but the instrument for which his name is best known is the tuning fork
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Progressive Rock
Progressive rock
Progressive rock
(shortened as prog; sometimes called art rock, classical rock or symphonic rock) is a broad subgenre of rock music[7] that developed in the United Kingdom
United Kingdom
and United States
United States
throughout the mid to late 1960s
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Electromagnet
An electromagnet is a type of magnet in which the magnetic field is produced by an electric current. The magnetic field disappears when the current is turned off. Electromagnets usually consist of wire wound into a coil. A current through the wire creates a magnetic field which is concentrated in the hole in the center of the coil. The wire turns are often wound around a magnetic core made from a ferromagnetic or ferrimagnetic material such as iron; the magnetic core concentrates the magnetic flux and makes a more powerful magnet. The main advantage of an electromagnet over a permanent magnet is that the magnetic field can be quickly changed by controlling the amount of electric current in the winding
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Helmholtz Resonator
Helmholtz resonance
Helmholtz resonance
or wind throb is the phenomenon of air resonance in a cavity, such as when one blows across the top of an empty bottle. The name comes from a device created in the 1850s by Hermann von Helmholtz, the Helmholtz resonator, which he used to identify the various frequencies or musical pitches present in music and other complex sounds.[1]Contents1 History 2 Quantitative explanation 3 Applications 4 Notes 5 Further readingHistory[edit]A selection of Helmholtz resonators from 1870, Hunterian Museum, GlasgowHelmho
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Tuning Fork
A tuning fork is an acoustic resonator in the form of a two-pronged fork with the prongs (tines) formed from a U-shaped bar of elastic metal (usually steel). It resonates at a specific constant pitch when set vibrating by striking it against a surface or with an object, and emits a pure musical tone once the high overtones die out. The pitch that a particular tuning fork generates depends on the length and mass of the two prongs
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Flute
Plucked Appalachian dulcimer
Appalachian dulcimer
(United States) Autoharp Baglama
Baglama
or Saz (Turkey)
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Oscillator
Oscillation
Oscillation
is the repetitive variation, typically in time, of some measure about a central value (often a point of equilibrium) or between two or more different states. The term vibration is precisely used to describe mechanical oscillation
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Electromagnets
An electromagnet is a type of magnet in which the magnetic field is produced by an electric current. The magnetic field disappears when the current is turned off. Electromagnets usually consist of wire wound into a coil. A current through the wire creates a magnetic field which is concentrated in the hole in the center of the coil. The wire turns are often wound around a magnetic core made from a ferromagnetic or ferrimagnetic material such as iron; the magnetic core concentrates the magnetic flux and makes a more powerful magnet. The main advantage of an electromagnet over a permanent magnet is that the magnetic field can be quickly changed by controlling the amount of electric current in the winding
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Reed (instrument)
A reed is a thin strip of material which vibrates to produce a sound on a musical instrument. The reeds of most woodwind instruments are made from Arundo donax
Arundo donax
("Giant cane") or synthetic material; tuned reeds (as in harmonicas and accordions) are made of metal or synthetics. Musical instruments may be classified according to the type and number of reeds used. The earliest types of single-reed instruments used idioglottal reeds, where the vibrating reed is a tongue cut and shaped on the tube of cane. Much later, single-reed instruments started using heteroglottal reeds, where a reed is cut and separated from the tube of cane and attached to a mouthpiece of some sort
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