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Synnøve Anker Aurdal
Synnøve Anker Aurdal
Synnøve Anker Aurdal
(8 December 1908 – 2 April 2000) was a Norwegian textile artist. She was born in Kristiania to Nils Botvid Anker and Gudrun Nilssen, and was sister of librarian Øyvind Anker
Øyvind Anker
and granddaughter of Herman Anker. She was married to painter Leon Aurdal from 1944, and to painter and sculptor Ludvig Eikaas
Ludvig Eikaas
from 1949. Her works include Flammedans from 1955, Blå rytmer from 1956, Høyseteteppet (1958–1961), a decoration of Håkonshallen
Håkonshallen
in Bergen, and Telegram from 1968. She represented Norway at the Venice Biennale
Venice Biennale
in 1982. She was decorated Knight, First Class of the Order of St. Olav
Order of St. Olav
in 1980, and was awarded the Prince Eugen Medal
Prince Eugen Medal
in 1991
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Oslo
Oslo
Oslo
(English: /ˈɒzloʊ/, OZ-loh,[9] Norwegian pronunciation: [²uʂlu] ( listen) or, rarer [²uslu] or [ˈuʂlu]) is the capital and the most populous city in Norway. It constitutes both a county and a municipality. Founded in the year 1040, and established as a kaupstad or trading place in 1048 by Harald Hardrada, the city was elevated to a bishopric in 1070 and a capital under Haakon V of Norway
Norway
around 1300. Personal unions with Denmark from 1397 to 1523 and again from 1536 to 1814 and with Sweden
Sweden
from 1814 to 1905 reduced its influence. After being destroyed by a fire in 1624, during the reign of King Christian IV, the city was moved closer to Akershus Fortress
Akershus Fortress
and renamed Christiania in the king's honour. It was established as a municipality (formannskapsdistrikt) on 1 January 1838
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Knut Helle
Knut Helle (19 December 1930 – 27 June 2015) was a Norwegian historian.[1] A professor at the University of Bergen
University of Bergen
from 1973 to 2000, he specialized in the late medieval history of Norway. He has contributed to several large works. Early life, education and marriage[edit] He was born in Larvik
Larvik
as the son of school inspector Hermann Olai Helle (1893–1973) and teacher Berta Marie Malm (1906–1991).[2] He was the older brother of politician Ingvar Lars Helle.[3] The family moved to Hetland
Hetland
when Knut Helle was seventeen years old.[2] He took the examen artium in Stavanger
Stavanger
in 1949, and a teacher's education in Kristiansand
Kristiansand
in 1952. He studied philology in Oslo and Bergen, and graduated with the cand.philol. degree in 1957
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992
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Store Norske Leksikon
Store norske leksikon, abbreviated SNL, is a Norwegian language (bokmål) encyclopedia. The SNL was created in 1978 when the two publishing houses Aschehoug
Aschehoug
and Gyldendal
Gyldendal
merged their encyclopedias and created the company Kunnskapsforlaget.[1] The name translates into English as Great Norwegian encyclopedia. Up until 1978 the two publishing houses of Aschehoug
Aschehoug
and Gyldendal, Norway's two largest, had published Aschehougs konversasjonsleksikon (no) and Gyldendals konversasjonsleksikon (no), respectively. The respective first editions were published in 1907–1913 (Aschehoug) and 1933–1934 (Gyldendal). The slump in selling paperbased encyclopedias around the turn of the 21st century hit the Kunnskapsforlaget hard, but a fourth edition of the paperbased encyclopedia was finally secured by a grant of 10 million Norwegian kroner from the foundation Fritt Ord in 2003
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Anne Marit Godal
Anne Marit Godal (born 20 November 1972) is a Norwegian website editor. She studied political science at the University of Oslo
University of Oslo
and has had positions in the Norwegian Labour Party
Norwegian Labour Party
and No to the EU.[1][2] On 1 April 2011, she became the head[2] of Norsk nettleksikon, the successor of Store norske leksikon, Store medisinske leksikon and Norsk biografisk leksikon.[3] In 2011 the organisation had financing for three years for a total of 31.5 million Norwegian kroner.[2] References[edit]^ "Anne Marit Godal". Store norske leksikon. Archived from the original on 3 June 2011. Retrieved 4 July 2011.  ^ a b c "Skal lede norsk-konkurrent". Aftenposten
Aftenposten
(in Norwegian). Norwegian News Agency. 15 January 2011. Retrieved 4 July 2011.  ^ Guttormsen, Arne (15 January 2011). "Skal lede Norsk nettleksikon". Vårt Land (in Norwegian)
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Lauritz Opstad
Jens Lauritz Opstad (5 May 1917 – 23 May 2003) was a Norwegian museum director and historian. He was born in Tune as a son of wholesaler Jens Lauritzen Opstad (1884–1963) and Laura Kristine Thune (1885–1921). He finished his secondary education in Sarpsborg
Sarpsborg
in 1937 and at the University of Oslo he took the cand.mag. degree in 1941 and the cand.philol. degree in history in 1943.[1] He was a school teacher in Fredrikstad
Fredrikstad
from 1944 to 1945, then a consultant for half a year at the Norwegian Museum of Decorative Arts and Design. He was a curator at Stavanger Museum/ Ledaal
Ledaal
from 1947 to 1948, county curator in Østfold County Municipality
Østfold County Municipality
from 1948 to 1967 and director of the Norwegian Museum of Decorative Arts and Design from 1967 to 1987
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Norsk Biografisk Leksikon
Norsk biografisk leksikon
Norsk biografisk leksikon
is the largest Norwegian biographical encyclopedia. The first edition (NBL1) was issued between 1921 and 1983, including 19 volumes and 5,100 articles. It was published by Aschehoug
Aschehoug
with economic support from the state.[citation needed] Kunnskapsforlaget bought the rights to NBL1 from Aschehoug
Aschehoug
in 1995, and after a pre-project in 1996-97 the work for a new edition began in 1998.[citation needed] The project had economic support from the Fritt Ord Foundation and the Ministry of Culture, and the second edition (NBL2) was launched in the years 1999-2005, including 10 volumes and ca
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Bergen
Bergen, historically Bjørgvin, is a city and municipality in Hordaland
Hordaland
on the west coast of Norway. At the end of the first quarter of 2016[update], the municipality's population was 278,121,[1] and the Bergen
Bergen
metropolitan region has about 420,000 inhabitants. Bergen
Bergen
is the second-largest city in Norway. The municipality covers 465 square kilometres (180 sq mi) and is on the peninsula of Bergenshalvøyen. The city centre and northern neighbourhoods are on Byfjorden, 'the city fjord', and the city is surrounded by mountains; Bergen
Bergen
is known as the 'city of seven mountains'. Many of the extra-municipal suburbs are on islands
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Håkonshallen
Bergenhus fortress (Norwegian: Bergenhus festning) is a fortress located in Bergen, Norway. Located at the entrance of Bergen
Bergen
harbour, the caste is one of the oldest and best preserved stone fortifications in Norway.[1]Contents1 History 2 Prominent buildings2.1 Haakon's Hall 2.2 Rosenkrantz Tower3 References 4 Other sources 5 External linksHistory[edit]Battle of Vågen, August 12, 1665. Note that this depiction bears little or no resemble to the actual topography of the areaThe fortress contains buildings dating as far back as the 1240s, as well as later constructions built as recently as World War II. The extent of the enclosed area of today dates from the early 19th century. In medieval times, the area of the present-day Bergenhus Fortress was known as Holmen (The islet) and contained the royal residence in Bergen, as well as a cathedral, several churches, the bishop's residence, and a Dominican monastery
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Order Of St. Olav
The Royal Norwegian Order of Saint Olav (Norwegian: Den Kongelige Norske Sankt Olavs Orden; or Sanct Olafs Orden, the old Norwegian name) is a Norwegian order of chivalry instituted by King Oscar I
King Oscar I
on August 21, 1847. It is named after King Olav II, known to posterity as St. Olav. Just before the union with Sweden
Sweden
was dissolved in 1905, the Order of the Norwegian Lion was instituted in 1904 by King Oscar II, but no appointments were awarded by his successor, King Haakon VII. The Order of St. Olav thus became the kingdom's only order of chivalry for the next 80 years. The Grand Master of the order is the reigning monarch of Norway. It is used to reward individuals for remarkable accomplishments on behalf of the country and humanity
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Herman Anker
Herman Anker
Herman Anker
(15 July 1839 – 9 August 1896) was a Norwegian school teacher and educationalist. [1] He was born at Rød Manor in Halden, a son of wholesaler Peter Martin Anker. He was the brother of Christian August Anker, and father of Katti Anker Møller
Katti Anker Møller
and Ella Anker. He went to the Latin School at Fredrikshald and took school graduation in 1857. He attended the University of Christiania earning his theological degree in 1863. [2] As a theological student in Copenhagen, he had met Grundtvig
Grundtvig
and became introduced to his thought on education and the development of the folk high school movement. In 1864 along with Olaus Arvesen, he founded Sagatun Folk High School
Sagatun Folk High School
at Hamar. This was the first folk high school in Norway. [3] [4][5] [6] References[edit]^ Godal, Anne Marit (ed.). "Herman Anker"
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Venice Biennale
The Venice
Venice
Biennale
Biennale
(/ˌbiːɛˈnɑːleɪ, -li/; Italian: La Biennale di Venezia [la bi.enˈnaːle di veˈnɛttsja]; in English also called the "
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Prince Eugen Medal
The Prince Eugen Medal
Medal
(Swedish: Prins Eugen-medaljen), is a medal conferred by the King of Sweden
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Ludvig Eikaas
Ludvig Eikaas
Ludvig Eikaas
(20 December 1920 – 5 September 2010) was a Norwegian painter, graphic artist and sculptor. Eikaas was among the first artists in Norway
Norway
to work in a purely non-figurative idiom.[1]Contents1 Biography 2 Personal life 3 Eikaas Gallery 4 References 5 Other sources 6 External linksBiography[edit] Ludvig Eikaas
Ludvig Eikaas
was born in the small hamlet of Eikaas in Jølster municipality in Sogn og Fjordane, Norway. He studied at the National College of Art and Design (1942–46), then at the National Art Academy and at the Art Academy in Copenhagen
Copenhagen
(1948). Throughout his life as an artist, Eikaas showed great latitude in their choice of techniques and motifs. Few Norwegian artists in the postwar period showed so much imagination and curiosity. Eikaas' imagination was frequently paired with an irrepressible sense of humor
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Leon Aurdal
Leon Aurdal (23 January 1890 – 25 January 1949) was a Norwegian painter. He was born in Bergen to Bastian Aurdal and Severine Grebstad. He was married twice, first to Kristmar Aurdal, and from 1944 to textile artist Synnøve Anker Aurdal. His works include Sittende ung dame from 1925, Semsvatnet from 1938, and På lokalbåten from 1945, all at the National Gallery of Norway. He is also represented in galleries in Bergen, Trondheim, Stavanger, Fredrikstad and Drammen.[1][2] References[edit]^ Thue, Oscar. "Leon Aurdal". Norsk kunstnerleksikon (in Norwegian). Retrieved 2 July 2016.  ^ Godal, Anne Marit (ed.). "Leon Aurdal". Store norske leksikon (in Norwegian). Oslo: Norsk nettleksikon. Retrieved 2 July 2016. This Norwegian biographical article is a stub
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