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Syahi
Syahi
Syahi
(also known as gaab, ank, satham or karanai) is the tuning paste applied to the head of many South Asian percussion instruments like the dholki, tabla, madal, mridangam, khol and pakhavaj.Contents1 Overview 2 Function 3 Application 4 Producing the latticework4.1 Wear5 ReferencesOverview[edit] Syahi
Syahi
is usually black in colour, circular in shape and is made of a mixture of flour, water and iron filings.[1] Originally, syahi was a temporary application of flour and water. Over time it has evolved into a permanent addition. Function[edit] Syahi
Syahi
functions by loading only a portion of the stretched skin with weight. In the higher-pitched (usually right-hand) drum (for instance, the tabla proper) this has the effect of altering the resonance frequency of some lower order vibrations more than others. The action on the left hand drum is a little different
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Flour
Flour
Flour
is a substance, generally a powder, made by grinding raw grains or roots and used to make many different foods. Cereal
Cereal
flour is the main ingredient of bread, which is a staple food for most cultures. Wheat flour
Wheat flour
is one of the most important ingredients in Oceanic, European, South American, North American, Middle Eastern, North Indian and North African
North African
cultures, and is the defining ingredient in their styles of breads and pastries. Wheat
Wheat
is the most common base for flour. Corn flour has been important in Mesoamerican cuisine since ancient times and remains a staple in the Americas. Rye
Rye
flour is a constituent of bread in central Europe. Cereal
Cereal
flour consists either of the endosperm, germ, and bran together (whole-grain flour) or of the endosperm alone (refined flour)
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992
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South Asia
South
South
Asia
Asia
or Southern Asia
Asia
(also known as Indian subcontinent) is a term used to represent the southern region of the Asian continent, which comprises the sub-Himalayan SAARC
SAARC
countries and, for some authorities, adjoining countries to the west and east. Topographically, it is dominated by the Indian Plate, which rises above sea level as Nepal
Nepal
and all parts of India
India
situated south of the Himalayas
Himalayas
and the Hindu
Hindu
Kush
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Percussion
A percussion instrument is a musical instrument that is sounded by being struck or scraped by a beater (including attached or enclosed beaters or rattles); struck, scraped or rubbed by hand; or struck against another similar instrument. The percussion family is believed to include the oldest musical instruments, following the human voice.[1] The percussion section of an orchestra most commonly contains instruments such as timpani, snare drum, bass drum, cymbals, triangle and tambourine. However, the section can also contain non-percussive instruments, such as whistles and sirens, or a blown conch shell. Percussive techniques can also be applied to the human body, as in body percussion
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Madal
The Madal
Madal
(Nepali: मादल), is used mainly for rhythm-keeping in Nepalese folk music, is the most popular and widely used as hand drum in Nepal. The Madal
Madal
consists of a cylindrical body with a slight bulge at its center and heads at both ends, one head larger than the other. It is usually played horizontally in a seated position, with both heads played simultaneously. Madal
Madal
is a National Instrument of Nepal
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Pakhavaj
The pakhawaj or mridang is an Indian barrel-shaped, two-headed drum,[1] a variant and descendant of the older mridang. It is the standard percussion instrument in the dhrupad style and is used as an accompaniment for various forms of music and dance performances. The pakhavaj has a low, mellow tone, very rich in harmonics. Set horizontally on a cushion in front of the drummer's crossed leg, the larger bass-skin is played with the left hand, the treble skin by the right hand. The bass face is smeared with wet wheat dough which acts as the kiran and is the cause of the vivid bass sound the pakhavaj produces. The Pakhawaj
Pakhawaj
is tuned like the tabla, with wooden wedges that are placed under the tautening straps. The fine tuning is done on the woven outer ring which is part of the skin
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Musical Tuning
In music, there are two common meanings for tuning:Tuning practice, the act of tuning an instrument or voice. Tuning systems, the various systems of pitches used to tune an instrument, and their theoretical bases.Contents1 Tuning practice1.1 Open strings 1.2 Altered tunings 1.3 Tuning of unpitched percussion instruments2 Tuning systems2.1 Theoretical comparison 2.2 Systems for the twelve-note chromatic scale 2.3 Other scale systems3 See also 4 References 5 Further readingTuning practice[edit]Man turning tuning pegs to tune guitarTuning of Sébastien Érard
Sébastien Érard
harp using Korg OT-120 Wide 8 Octave Orchestral Digital TunerTuning is the process of adjusting the pitch of one or many tones from musical instruments to establish typical intervals between these tones. Tuning is usually based on a fixed reference, such as A = 440 Hz
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Water
Water
Water
is a transparent, tasteless, odorless, and nearly colorless chemical substance that is the main constituent of Earth's streams, lakes, and oceans, and the fluids of most living organisms. Its chemical formula is H2O, meaning that each of its molecules contains one oxygen and two hydrogen atoms that are connected by covalent bonds. Strictly speaking, water refers to the liquid state of a substance that prevails at standard ambient temperature and pressure; but it often refers also to its solid state (ice) or its gaseous state (steam or water vapor). It also occurs in nature as snow, glaciers, ice packs and icebergs, clouds, fog, dew, aquifers, and atmospheric humidity. Water
Water
covers 71% of the Earth's surface.[1] It is vital for all known forms of life
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Iron Filing
Iron
Iron
filings are very small pieces of iron that look like a light powder. They are very often used in science demonstrations to show the direction of a magnetic field. Since iron is a ferromagnetic material, a magnetic field induces each particle to become a tiny bar magnet. The south pole of each particle then attracts the north poles of its neighbors, and this process repeated over a wide area creates chains of filings parallel to the direction of the magnetic field. Iron Filings are used in many places including schools where they test the reaction of the filings to magnets. History[edit] Main article: History of ferrous metallurgy Filings are mostly a byproduct of the grinding, filing, or milling of finished iron products, so their history largely tracks the development of iron
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Resonance
In physics, resonance is a phenomenon in which a vibrating system or external force drives another system to oscillate with greater amplitude at specific frequencies. Frequencies at which the response amplitude is a relative maximum are known as the system's resonant frequencies or resonance frequencies. At resonant frequencies, small periodic driving forces have the ability to produce large amplitude oscillations, due to the storage of vibrational energy.Contents1 Overview 2 Examples2.1 Tacoma Narrows Bridge 2.2 International Space Station3 Types of resonance3.1 Mechanical and acoustic resonance 3.2 Electrical resonance 3.3 Optical resonance 3.4 Orbital resonance 3.5 Atomic, particle, and molecular resonance4 Theory 5 Resonators 6 Q factor 7 See also 8 References 9 External linksOverview[edit]
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Mucilage
Mucilage
Mucilage
is a thick, gluey substance produced by nearly all plants and some microorganisms.These microorganisms include protists which use it for their locomotion. Their movement is always opposite to the secretion of mucilage[1]. It is a polar glycoprotein and an exopolysaccharide. Mucilage
Mucilage
in plants plays a role in the storage of water and food, seed germination, and thickening membranes. Cacti (and other succulents) and flax seeds especially are rich sources of mucilage[2].Contents1 Occurrence 2 Human uses 3 Ecological implications for plants 4 Plant
Plant
sources 5 See also 6 References 7 External linksOccurrence[edit] Exopolysaccharides are the most stabilising factor for microaggregates and are widely distributed in soils. Therefore, exopolysaccharide-producing "soil algae" play a vital role in the ecology of the world's soils
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Latticework
Latticework
Latticework
is an openwork framework consisting of a criss-crossed pattern of strips of building material, typically wood or metal. The design is created by crossing the strips to form a grid or weave.[1] Latticework
Latticework
may be functional – for example, to allow airflow to or through an area; structural, as a truss in a lattice girder;[2] used to add privacy, as through a lattice screen; purely decorative; or some combination of these. Latticework
Latticework
in stone or wood from the classical period is also called transenna (plural transenne). In India, the house of a rich or noble person may be built with a baramdah or verandah surrounding every level leading to the living area
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International Standard Book Number
"ISBN" redirects here. For other uses, see ISBN (other).International Standard Book
Book
NumberA 13-digit ISBN, 978-3-16-148410-0, as represented by an EAN-13 bar codeAcronym ISBNIntroduced 1970; 48 years ago (1970)Managing organisation International ISBN AgencyNo. of digits 13 (formerly 10)Check digit Weighted sumExample 978-3-16-148410-0Website www.isbn-international.orgThe International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a unique[a][b] numeric commercial book identifier. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each edition and variation (except reprintings) of a book. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book would each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is 13 digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007, and 10 digits long if assigned before 2007
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Dholki
The Dholki (Marathi: ढोलकी) is a South Asian two-headed hand-drum. It is also known as Nal. It screw-turnbuckle tensioning on both sides. This is longer than Dholak
Dholak
and having lesser diameter. The Dholki is mainly a folk instrument, lacking the exact tuning and playing techniques of the tabla or the pakhawaj. The drum is pitched, depending on size, with an interval of perhaps a perfect fourth or perfect fifth between the two heads. This is the instrument used for high pitch music.[1]Contents1 Construction 2 Usage2.1 Usage in Lavani3 Playing style 4 See also 5 ReferencesConstruction[edit] The left side resembles the bayan (large metal drum of the tabla) except that it uses dholak masala (oil-based application) on the inner surface instead of a syahi (permanent black spot). The right head is unique in its construction
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Mridangam
The Mridangam
Mridangam
is a percussion instrument from India
India
of ancient origin. It is the primary rhythmic accompaniment in a Carnatic music
Carnatic music
ensemble, and in Dhrupad, where it is known as Pakhawaj. During a percussion ensemble, the mridangam is often accompanied by the ghatam, kanjira, and morsing.Contents1 Etymology 2 Legend 3 History3.1 Tamil culture4 Construction 5 Methods of use 6 Posture 7 Strokes 8 Modern usage 9 Mridangamela 10 Players10.1 Past players 10.2 Notable players11 See also 12 References 13 External linksEtymology[edit] In Tamil culture, it is called a tannumai.The earliest mention of the mridangam in Tamil literature is found perhaps in the Sangam literature where the instrument is known as 'tannumai'
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