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Swift
The Society for Worldwide Interbank Financial Telecommunication (SWIFT) provides a network that enables financial institutions worldwide to send and receive information about financial transactions in a secure, standardized and reliable environment. SWIFT
SWIFT
also sells software and services to financial institutions, much of it for use on the SWIFTNet Network, and ISO 9362. Business Identifier Codes (BICs, previously Bank Identifier Codes) are popularly known as "SWIFT codes". The majority of international interbank messages use the SWIFT network
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Java Caps
Java Composite Application Platform Suite (CAPS or Java CAPS), is a standards-based Enterprise Service Bus
Enterprise Service Bus
software suite from Oracle Corporation.[1] Java CAPS has several components which help to integrate existing applications and deliver new business services in a service-oriented architecture environment. Java CAPS is related to the Open ESB[2] open source project.Contents1 History1.1 Version history2 Suite components 3 Comparison3.1 Java CAPS 6 vs Java CAPS 54 Future of Java CAPS 5 Oracle Java Caps
Java Caps
Product Lifecycle 6 See also 7 References 8 External linksHistory[edit] Java CAPS was originally a product of SeeBeyond Technology Corporation named Integrated Composite Application Network Suite (ICAN)
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Submarine Communications Cable
A submarine communications cable is a cable laid on the sea bed between land-based stations to carry telecommunication signals across stretches of ocean and sea. The first submarine communications cables laid beginning in the 1850s carried telegraphy traffic, establishing the first instant telecommunications links between continents, such as the first transatlantic telegraph cable which became operational on 16 August 1858. Subsequent generations of cables carried telephone traffic, then data communications traffic
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John N. Dalton
John Nichols Dalton (July 11, 1931 – July 30, 1986) was an American politician who served as the 63rd governor of Virginia, from 1978 to 1982. Dalton won the office with 55.9% of the vote, defeating Democrat Henry E. Howell, Jr and Independent Alan R. Ogden. Dalton had previously served as Lieutenant Governor of Virginia. Biography[edit]Dalton in 1981Born in Emporia, Virginia, Dalton graduated from the College of William and Mary in Williamsburg, Virginia, and the University of Virginia
Virginia
Law School. He served in both houses of the General Assembly ( Virginia
Virginia
House of Delegates, 1966–1972, Senate of Virginia, 1973). Dalton was the 32nd Lieutenant Governor from 1974 to 1978. As governor, he pursued policies of limited government
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Registration Authority
Registration authorities exist for many standards organizations, such as ANNA (Association of National Numbering Agencies for ISIN), the Object Management Group, W3C, IEEE
IEEE
and others. In general, registration authorities all perform a similar function, in promoting the use of a particular standard through facilitating its use. This may be by applying the standard, where appropriate, or by verifying that a particular application satisfies the standard's tenants. Maintenance agencies, in contrast, may change an element in a standard based on set rules – such as the creation or change of a currency code when a currency is created or revalued (i.e. TRL to TRY for Turkish lira)
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International Organization For Standardization
The International Organization for Standardization
Standardization
(ISO) is an international standard-setting body composed of representatives from various national standards organizations. Founded on 23 February 1947, the organization promotes worldwide proprietary, industrial and commercial standards
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ISO 10383
The Market Identifier Code
Market Identifier Code
(MIC) (ISO 10383) is a unique identification code used to identify securities trading exchanges, regulated and non-regulated trading markets. The MIC is a four alpha character code, and is defined in ISO 10383.[1] by International Organization for Standardization (ISO).[2] For example, trades that are executed on the US NASDAQ
NASDAQ
market are identified using MIC code XNAS.Contents1 ISO 10383 2 See also 3 Notes 4 External linksISO 10383[edit] ISO 10383
ISO 10383
is the ISO standard which "specifies a universal method of identifying exchanges, trading platforms and regulated or non-regulated markets as sources of prices and related information in order to facilitate automated processing." The FIX Protocol uses MICs to represent values of the Fix Exchange data type
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Request For Comments
A Request for Comments (RFC), in the context of Internet
Internet
governance, is a type of publication from the Internet
Internet
Engineering Task Force (IETF) and the Internet Society
Internet Society
(ISOC), the principal technical development and standards-setting bodies for the Internet. An RFC is authored by engineers and computer scientists in the form of a memorandum describing methods, behaviors, research, or innovations applicable to the working of the Internet
Internet
and Internet-connected systems. It is submitted either for peer review or to convey new concepts, information, or (occasionally) engineering humor.[1] The IETF adopts some of the proposals published as RFCs as Internet Standards. Request for Comments documents were invented by Steve Crocker in 1969 to help record unofficial notes on the development of ARPANET
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Uniform Resource Name
In computing, a Uniform Resource Name
Name
(URN) is a Uniform Resource Identifier
Identifier
(URI) that uses the urn schemeContents1 URIs, URNs, and URLs 2 Syntax 3 Namespaces3.1 Formal 3.2 Informal 3.3 Experimental4 Examples 5 See also 6 References6.1 Citations 6.2 Sources7 External linksURIs, URNs, and URLs[edit] URNs were originally conceived to be part of a three-part information architecture for the Internet, along with Uniform Resource Locators (URLs) and Uniform Resource Characteristics (URCs), a metadata framework. As described in the 1994 RFC 1737,[1], and later in the 1997 RFC 2141 [2], URNs were distinguished from URLs, which identify resources by specifying their locations in the context of a particular access protocol, such as HTTP
HTTP
or FTP
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Data Center
A data center is a facility used to house computer systems and associated components, such as telecommunications and storage systems. It generally includes redundant[clarification needed] or backup power supplies, redundant data communications connections, environmental controls (e.g. air conditioning, fire suppression) and various security devices
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United States
Coordinates: 40°N 100°W / 40°N 100°W / 40; -100 United States
United States
of AmericaFlagGreat SealMotto:  "In God
God
We Trust"[1][fn 1]Other traditional mottos  "E pluribus unum" (Lat
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Switzerland
Switzerland
Switzerland
(/ˈswɪtsərlənd/), officially the Swiss Confederation, is a federal republic in Europe. It consists of 26 cantons, and the city of Bern
Bern
is the seat of the federal authorities.[1][2][note 1] The country is situated in Western-Central Europe,[note 4] and is bordered by Italy
Italy
to the south, France
France
to the west, Germany
Germany
to the north, and Austria
Austria
and Liechtenstein
Liechtenstein
to the east. Switzerland
Switzerland
is a landlocked country geographically divided between the Alps, the Swiss Plateau and the Jura, spanning a total area of 41,285 km2 (15,940 sq mi) (land area 39,997 km2 (15,443 sq mi))
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Policies And Procedures
A policy is a deliberate system of principles to guide decisions and achieve rational outcomes. A policy is a statement of intent, and is implemented as a procedure or protocol. Policies are generally adopted by a governance body within an organization. Policies can assist in both subjective and objective decision making. Policies to assist in subjective decision making usually assist senior management with decisions that must be based on the relative merits of a number of factors, and as a result are often hard to test objectively, e.g. work-life balance policy. In contrast policies to assist in objective decision making are usually operational in nature and can be objectively tested, e.g. password policy.[1] The term may apply to government, private sector organizations and groups, as well as individuals. Presidential executive orders, corporate privacy policies, and parliamentary rules of order are all examples of policy. Policy differs from rules or law
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X.25
X.25
X.25
is an ITU-T standard protocol suite for packet switched wide area network (WAN) communication. An X.25
X.25
WAN consists of packet-switching exchange (PSE) nodes as the networking hardware, and leased lines, plain old telephone service connections, or ISDN
ISDN
connections as physical links. X.25
X.25
is a family of protocols that was popular during the 1980s with telecommunications companies and in financial transaction systems such as automated teller machines
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XML
In computing, Extensible Markup Language
Language
(XML) is a markup language that defines a set of rules for encoding documents in a format that is both human-readable and machine-readable. The W3C's XML
XML
1.0 Specification[2] and several other related specifications[3]—all of them free open standards—define XML.[4] The design goals of XML
XML
emphasize simplicity, generality, and usability across the Internet.[5] It is a textual data format with strong support via Unicode
Unicode
for different human languages
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Secure Transmission
In computer science, secure transmission refers to the transfer of data such as confidential or proprietary information over a secure channel. Many secure transmission methods require a type of encryption. The most common email encryption is called PKI. In order to open the encrypted file an exchange of keys is done. Many infrastructures such as banks rely on secure transmission protocols to prevent a catastrophic breach of security. Secure transmissions are put in place to prevent attacks such as ARP spoofing and general data loss
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