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Swastika
The swastika (as a character 卐 or 卍) is an ancient religious icon used in the Indian subcontinent, East Asia
East Asia
and Southeast Asia, where it has been and remains a sacred symbol of spiritual principles in Hinduism, Buddhism
Buddhism
and Jai
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Mirror Image
A mirror image (in a plane mirror) is a reflected duplication of an object that appears almost identical, but is reversed in the direction perpendicular to the mirror surface. As an optical effect it results from reflection off of substances such as a mirror or water
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Aegean Sea
The Aegean Sea
Sea
(/ɪˈdʒiːən/; Greek: Αιγαίο Πέλαγος [eˈʝeo ˈpelaɣos] ( listen); Turkish: Ege Denizi Turkish pronunciation: [eɟe denizi])[stress?] is an elongated embayment of the Mediterranean Sea
Mediterranean Sea
located between the Greek and Anatolian peninsulas, i.e., between the mainlands of Greece
Greece
and Turkey. In the north, the Aegean is connected to the Marmara Sea
Sea
and Black Sea
Sea
by the Dardanelles
Dardanelles
and Bosphorus
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Bon
Bon, also spelled Bön[2] (Tibetan: བོན་, Wylie: bon, Lhasa dialect IPA: pʰø̃̀), is a Tibetan religion, which self-identifies as distinct from Tibetan Buddhism, although it shares the same overall teachings and terminology
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Ideogram
An ideogram or ideograph (from Greek ἰδέα idéa "idea" and γράφω gráphō "to write") is a graphic symbol that represents an idea or concept, independent of any particular language, and specific words or phrases. Some ideograms are comprehensible only by familiarity with prior convention; others convey their meaning through pictorial resemblance to a physical object, and thus may also be referred to as pictograms.Contents1 Terminology 2 Mathematics 3 Proposed universal languages 4 See also 5 References 6 External linksTerminology[edit] Further information: Character (symbol) and Logogram"No dogs allowed" sign in Spain. The dog illustration is a pictogram. The red circle and bar is an ideogram representing the idea of "no" or "not allowed".Ideograms in the Church of the Visitation, JerusalemIn proto-writing, used for inventories and the like, physical objects are represented by stylized or conventionalized pictures, or pictograms
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Aryan Race
The Aryan
Aryan
race was a racial grouping used in the period of the late 19th century and mid-20th century to describe people of European and Western Asian heritage.[1] It derives from the idea that the original speakers of the Indo-European languages
Indo-European languages
and their descendants up to the present day constitute a distinctive race or subrace of the putative Caucasian race.[2]Contents1 Etymology 2 19th-century physical anthropology 3 Occultism3.1 Theosophy 3.2 Ariosophy4 Aryanism4.1 Nazism 4.2 Italian Fascism 4.3 Neo-Nazism5 See also 6 References 7 External linksEtymology Main article: AryanThe earliest epigraphically attested reference to the word "Aryan" occurs in the 6th-century BC Behistun inscription, which describes itself to have been composed "in Aryan
Aryan
(arya) [language or script]" (§ 70)
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Racism
Racism
Racism
is the belief in the superiority of one race over another, which often results in discrimination and prejudice towards people based on their race or ethnicity. Today, the use of the term "racism" does not easily fall under a single definition.[1] The ideology underlying racist practices often includes the idea that humans can be subdivided into distinct groups that are different due to their social behavior and their innate capacities as well as the idea that they can be ranked as inferior or superior.[2] Historical examples of institutional racism include the Holocaust, the apartheid regime in South Africa, and slavery and segregation in the United States
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Ancient Greek
The Ancient Greek language
Greek language
includes the forms of Greek used in ancient Greece
Greece
and the ancient world from around the 9th century BC to the 6th century AD. It is often roughly divided into the Archaic period (9th to 6th centuries BC), Classical period (5th and 4th centuries BC), and Hellenistic period
Hellenistic period
(Koine Greek, 3rd century BC to the 4th century AD). It is antedated in the second millennium BC by Mycenaean Greek and succeeded by medieval Greek. Koine is regarded as a separate historical stage of its own, although in its earliest form it closely resembled Attic Greek
Attic Greek
and in its latest form it approaches Medieval Greek
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Heinrich Schliemann
Heinrich Schliemann
Heinrich Schliemann
(/ˈʃliːmɑːn/;[1] German: [ˈʃliːman]; 6 January 1822 – 26 December 1890) was a German businessman and a pioneer in the field of archaeology. He was an advocate of the historicity of places mentioned in the works of Homer
Homer
and an archaeological excavator of Hissarlik, now presumed to be the site of Troy, along with the Mycenaean sites Mycenae
Mycenae
and Tiryns. His work lent weight to the idea that Homer's Iliad
Iliad
and Virgil's Aeneid
Aeneid
reflect historical events
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Hisarlik
Hisarlik
Hisarlik
(Turkish: Hisarlık, "Place of Fortresses"), often spelled Hissarlik, is the modern name for the generally agreed site of ancient Troy, also known as Ilion, and is located in what is now Turkey (historically Anatolia)[1] near to the modern city of Çanakkale[2]. The unoccupied archaeological site lies approximately 6.5 km from the Aegean Sea
Aegean Sea
and about the same distance from the Dardanelles. The archaeological site of Hisarlik
Hisarlik
is known in archaeological circles as a tell. A tell is an artificial hill, built up over centuries and millennia of occupation from its original site on a bedrock knob
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Vedas
DivisionsSamhita Brahmana Aranyaka UpanishadsUpanishads Rig vedicAitareya KaushitakiSama vedicChandogya KenaYajur vedicBrihadaranyaka Isha Taittiriya Katha Shvetashvatara MaitriAtharva vedicMundaka Mandukya PrashnaOther scripturesBhagavad Gita AgamasRelated Hindu
Hindu
textsVedangasShiksha Chandas Vyakarana Nirukta Kalpa JyotishaPuranas Brahma
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Byzantine Empire
The Byzantine
Byzantine
Empire, also referred to as the Eastern Roman Empire, was the continuation of the Roman Empire
Roman Empire
in the East during Late Antiquity and the Middle Ages, when its capital city was Constantinople
Constantinople
(modern-day Istanbul, which had been founded as Byzantium). It survived the fragmentation and fall of the Western Roman Empire
Roman Empire
in the 5th century AD and continued to exist for an additional thousand years until it fell to the Ottoman Turks in 1453.[2] During most of its existence, the empire was the most powerful economic, cultural, and military force in Europe
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Monier-Williams
Sir Monier Monier-Williams
Monier Monier-Williams
(né Monier Williams), KCIE (/ˈmɒnjər/; 12 November 1819 – 11 April 1899) was the second Boden Professor of Sanskrit
Sanskrit
at Oxford University, England. He studied, documented and taught Asian languages, especially Sanskrit, Persian and Hindustani.Contents1 Early life 2 Career 3 Writings and foundations 4 Honours 5 Published works5.1 Translations 5.2 Original works6 Notes 7 References 8 External linksEarly life[edit] Monier Williams was born in Bombay, the son of Colonel Monier Williams, surveyor-general in the Bombay
Bombay
presidency. His surname was "Williams" until 1887 when he added his Christian name to his surname to create the hyphenated "Monier-Williams". In 1822 he was sent to England to be educated at private schools at Hove, Chelsea and Finchley
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Pāṇini
Panini ( IAST
IAST
Pāṇini, fl
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Common Era
Common Era or Current Era (CE)[1] is a name for a calendar era widely used around the world today. The era preceding CE is known as before the Common or Current Era (BCE). The Current Era notation system can be used as an alternative to the Dionysian era
Dionysian era
system, which distinguishes eras as AD (anno Domini, "[the] year of [the] Lord")[2] and BC ("before Christ"). The two notation systems are numerically equivalent; thus "2018 CE" corresponds to "AD 2018" and "400 BCE" corresponds to "400 BC".[2][3][4][a] Both notations refer to the Gregorian calendar
Gregorian calendar
(and its predecessor, the Julian calendar)
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Floruit
Floruit (/ˈflɔːr(j)uɪt, ˈflɒr-/), abbreviated fl. (or occasionally, flor.), Latin
Latin
for "he/she flourished", denotes a date or period during which a person was known to have been alive or active.[1][2] In English, the word may also be used as a noun indicating the time when someone "flourished".[1] Etymology and use[edit] Latin: flōruit is the third-person singular perfect active indicative of the Latin
Latin
verb flōreō, flōrēre "to bloom, flower, or flourish", from the noun flōs, flōris, "flower".[3][2] Broadly, the term is employed in reference to the peak of activity for a person, movement, or such
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