HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Swansea
Swansea
Swansea
(/ˈswɒnzi/; Welsh: Abertawe [abɛrˈtawɛ]), officially known as the City and County of Swansea
Swansea
(Welsh: Dinas a Sir Abertawe), is a coastal city and county in Wales.[2] Swansea
Swansea
lies within the historic county boundaries of Glamorgan
Glamorgan
and the ancient Welsh commote of Gŵyr on the southwest coast.[3] The county area includes Swansea Bay (Welsh: Bae Abertawe) and the Gower Peninsula. According to its local council, the City and County of Swansea
Swansea
had a population of 241,300 in 2014. The last official census stated that the city, metropolitan and urban areas combined concluded to be a total of 462,000 in 2011,[4] making it the second most populous local authority area in Wales
Wales
after Cardiff
[...More...]

"Swansea" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Ethnicity
An ethnic group, or an ethnicity, is a category of people who identify with each other based on similarities such as common ancestry, language, society, culture or nation.[1][2] Ethnicity is usually an inherited status based on the society in which one lives. Membership of an ethnic group tends to be defined by a shared cultural heritage, ancestry, origin myth, history, homeland, language or dialect, symbolic systems such as religion, mythology and ritual, cuisine, dressing style, art, and physical appearance. Ethnic groups, derived from the same historical founder population, often continue to speak related languages and share a similar gene pool
[...More...]

"Ethnicity" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

Town Charter
A city charter or town charter (generically, municipal charter) is a legal document (charter) establishing a municipality such as a city or town. The concept developed in Europe
Europe
during the Middle Ages. Traditionally the granting of a charter gave a settlement and its inhabitants the right to town privileges under the feudal system. Townspeople who lived in chartered towns were burghers, as opposed to serfs who lived in villages. Towns were often "free", in the sense that they were directly protected by the king or emperor, and were not part of a feudal fief. Today the process for granting is determined by the type of government of the state in question. In monarchies, charters are still often a royal charter given by the Crown or the state authorities acting on behalf of the Crown
[...More...]

"Town Charter" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

UTC+1
UTC+01:00, known simply as UTC+1, is a time offset that adds 1 hour to Coordinated Universal Time
Coordinated Universal Time
(UTC). This time is used in:Central European Time West Africa Time Western European Summer TimeBritish Summer Time Irish Standard TimeRomance Standard Time (Microsoft Windows Control panel) Swatch Internet Time EVE OnlineIn ISO 8601 the
[...More...]

"UTC+1" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Labour Party (UK)
The Labour Party is a centre-left political party in the United Kingdom. It has been described as a broad church, bringing together an alliance of social democratic, democratic socialist and trade unionist outlooks.[9] The party's platform emphasises greater state intervention, social justice and strengthening workers' rights. Labour is a full member of the Party of European Socialists
Party of European Socialists
and Progressive Alliance, and holds observer status in the Socialist
Socialist
International. As of 2017, the party is considered the "largest party in Western Europe" in terms of party membership, with more than half-a-million members.[10] The Labour Party was founded in 1900, having grown out of the trade union movement and socialist parties of the nineteenth century
[...More...]

"Labour Party (UK)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

MPs Elected In The UK General Election, 2005
A general officer is an officer of high rank in the army, and in some nations' air forces or marines.[1] The term "general" is used in two ways: as the generic title for all grades of general officer and as a specific rank. It originates in the 16th century, as a shortening of captain general, which rank was taken from Middle French capitaine général. The adjective general had been affixed to officer designations since the late medieval period to indicate relative superiority or an extended jurisdiction. Today, the title of "General" is known in some countries as a four-star rank. However different countries use different systems of stars for senior ranks
[...More...]

"MPs Elected In The UK General Election, 2005" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

European Parliament
     GUE-NGL (52)      S&D (189)      Greens-EFA (51)      ALDE (68)      EPP (217)      ECR (73)      EFDD (44)      ENF (37)      Non-Inscrits
Non-Inscrits
(20)Committees22Budgets Budgetary Control Economic & Monetary Affairs Employment and Social Affairs Environment, Public Health & Food Safety Industry, Research & Energy Internal Market & Consumer Protection Transport & Tour
[...More...]

"European Parliament" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

SA Postcode Area
A postal code (also known locally in various English-speaking countries throughout the world as a postcode, post code, Eircode, PIN Code or ZIP Code) is a series of letters or digits or both, sometimes including spaces or punctuation, included in a postal address for the purpose of sorting mail. In February 2005, 117 of the 190 member countries of the Universal Postal Union had postal code systems. Although postal codes are usually assigned to geographical areas, special codes are sometimes assigned to individual addresses or to institutions that receive large volumes of mail, such as government agencies and large commercial companies
[...More...]

"SA Postcode Area" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

Telephone Numbering Plan
A telephone numbering plan is a type of numbering scheme used in telecommunication to assign telephone numbers to subscriber telephones or other telephony endpoints.[1] Telephone numbers are the addresses of participants in a telephone network, reachable by a system of destination code routing. Telephone numbering plans are defined in each of administrative regions of the public switched telephone network (PSTN) and they are also present in private telephone networks. For public number systems, geographic location plays a role in the sequence of numbers assigned to each telephone subscriber. Numbering plans may follow a variety of design strategies which have often arisen from the historical evolution of individual telephone networks and local requirements. A broad division is commonly recognized, distinguishing open numbering plans and closed numbering plans[discuss]
[...More...]

"Telephone Numbering Plan" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Time Zone
A time zone is a region of the globe that observes a uniform standard time for legal, commercial, and social purposes. Time
Time
zones tend to follow the boundaries of countries and their subdivisions because it is convenient for areas in close commercial or other communication to keep the same time. Most of the time zones on land are offset from Coordinated Universal Time
Time
(UTC) by a whole number of hours ( UTC−12
UTC−12
to UTC+14), but a few zones are offset by 30 or 45 minutes (e.g. Newfoundland Standard Time is UTC−03:30, Nepal
Nepal
Standard Time
Time
is UTC+05:45, and Indian Standard Time
Time
is UTC+05:30). Some higher latitude and temperate zone countries use daylight saving time for part of the year, typically by adjusting local clock time by an hour
[...More...]

"Time Zone" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Welsh Assembly
The National Assembly for Wales
Wales
(Welsh: Cynulliad Cenedlaethol Cymru; commonly known as the Welsh Assembly) is a devolved parliament with power to make legislation in Wales. The Assembly comprises 60 members, who are known as Assembly Members, or AMs (Aelodau y Cynulliad). Since 2011, Members are elected for five-year terms under an additional members system, in which 40 AMs represent geographical constituencies elected by the plurality system, and 20 AMs represent five electoral regions using the d'Hondt method of proportional representation. The Assembly was created by the Government of Wales
Wales
Act 1998, which followed a referendum in 1997. The Assembly had no powers to initiate primary legislation until limited law-making powers were gained through the Government of Wales
Wales
Act 2006
[...More...]

"Welsh Assembly" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Daylight Saving Time
Daylight saving time
Daylight saving time
(abbreviated DST), sometimes referred to as daylight savings time in US, Canadian and Australian speech,[1][2] and known as British Summer Time
British Summer Time
(BST) in the UK and just summer time in some countries, is the practice of advancing clocks during summer months so that evening daylight lasts longer, while sacrificing normal sunrise times. Typically, regions that use daylight saving time adjust clocks forward one hour close to the start of spring and adjust them backward in the autumn to standard time.[3] George Hudson proposed the idea of daylight saving in 1895.[4] The German Empire
German Empire
and Austria-Hungary
Austria-Hungary
organized the first nationwide implementation, starting on April 30, 1916
[...More...]

"Daylight Saving Time" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

British National Grid Reference System
The Ordnance Survey
Ordnance Survey
National Grid reference
Grid reference
system is a system of geographic grid references used in Great Britain, distinct from latitude and longitude. It is often called British National Grid (BNG).[1][2] The Ordnance Survey
Ordnance Survey
(OS) devised the national grid reference system, and it is heavily used in their survey data, and in maps based on those surveys, whether published by the Ordnance Survey
Ordnance Survey
or by commercial map producers
[...More...]

"British National Grid Reference System" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Nomenclature Of Territorial Units For Statistics
The Classification of Territorial Units for Statistics (NUTS; French: Nomenclature des unités territoriales statistiques) is a geocode standard for referencing the subdivisions of countries for statistical purposes.[1][2][3][4][5][6] The standard is developed and regulated by the European Union, and thus only covers the member states of the EU in detail. The Classification of Territorial Units for Statistics is instrumental in the European Union's Structural Fund
Structural Fund
delivery mechanisms and for locating the area where goods and services subject to European public procurement legislation are to be delivered. For each EU member country, a hierarchy of three NUTS levels is established by Eurostat
Eurostat
in agreement with each member state; the subdivisions in some levels do not necessarily correspond to administrative divisions within the country
[...More...]

"Nomenclature Of Territorial Units For Statistics" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

UTC0
UTC±00:00 is the following time: Coordinated Universal Time
Coordinated Universal Time
(UTC), the basis for the world's civil time. Western European Time
[...More...]

"UTC0" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Greenwich Mean Time
Greenwich
Greenwich
Mean Time
Time
(GMT) is the mean solar time at the Royal Observatory in Greenwich, London. GMT was formerly used as the international civil time standard, now superseded in that function by Coordinated Universal Time
Coordinated Universal Time
(UTC). Today GMT is considered equivalent to UTC for UK civil purposes (but this is not formalised) and for navigation is considered equivalent to UT1 (the modern form of mean solar time at 0° longitude); these two meanings can differ by up to 0.9 s
[...More...]

"Greenwich Mean Time" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse
.