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Sustainable Development
Sustainable development
Sustainable development
isthe organizing principle for meeting human development goals while at the same time sustaining the ability of natural systems to provide the natural resources and ecosystem services upon which the economy and society depend. The desired result is a state of society where living conditions and resource use continue to meet human needs without undermining the integrity and stability of the natural system. Sustainable development
Sustainable development
can be classified as development that meet the needs of the present without compromising the ability of future generations.While the modern concept of sustainable development is derived mostly from the 1987 Brundtland Report, it is also rooted in earlier ideas about sustainable forest management and twentieth century environmental concerns
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Wind
Wind
Wind
is the flow of gases on a large scale. On the surface of the Earth, wind consists of the bulk movement of air. In outer space, solar wind is the movement of gases or charged particles from the Sun through space, while planetary wind is the outgassing of light chemical elements from a planet's atmosphere into space. Winds are commonly classified by their spatial scale, their speed, the types of forces that cause them, the regions in which they occur, and their effect. The strongest observed winds on a planet in the Solar System occur on Neptune
Neptune
and Saturn. Winds have various aspects, an important one being its velocity (wind speed); another the density of the gas involved; another its energy content or wind energy
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US Forest Service
The United States Forest Service
United States Forest Service
(USFS) is an agency of the U.S. Department of Agriculture that administers the nation's 154 national forests and 20 national grasslands, which encompass 193 million acres (780,000 km2). Major divisions of the agency include the National Forest System, State and Private Forestry, Business Operations, and the Research and Development branch.[3] Managing approximately 25% of federal lands, it is the only major national land agency that is outside the U.S
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Augustus II The Strong
Augustus II the Strong
Augustus II the Strong
(German: August II. der Starke; Polish: August II Mocny; Lithuanian: Augustas II; 12 May 1670 – 1 February 1733) of the Albertine line of the House of Wettin
House of Wettin
was Elector of Saxony (as Frederick Augustus I), Imperial Vicar
Imperial Vicar
and elected King of Poland and Grand Duke of Lithuania. Augustus' great physical strength earned him the nicknames "the Strong", "the Saxon Hercules" and "Iron-Hand". He liked to show that he lived up to his name by breaking horseshoes with his bare hands and engaging in fox tossing by holding the end of his sling with just one finger while two of the strongest men in his court held the other end.[1] In order to be elected King of the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth, Augustus converted to Roman Catholicism
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Jean-Baptiste Colbert
Jean-Baptiste Colbert
Jean-Baptiste Colbert
(French: [ʒɑ̃.ba.tist kɔl.bɛʁ]; 29 August 1619 – 6 September 1683) was a French politician who served as the Minister of Finances of France
France
from 1665 to 1683 under the rule of King Louis XIV. His relentless hard work and thrift made him an esteemed minister. He achieved a reputation for his work of improving the state of French manufacturing and bringing the economy back from the brink of bankruptcy
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Sustained Yield
According to the Multiple Use, Sustained Yield Act of 1960 (P.L. 86-517), sustained yield (from the national forests) means the “achievement and maintenance in perpetuity of a high level of annual or regular periodic output of the various renewable resources of the national forests without impairment of the productivity of the land.” See also[edit]Sustainable yieldReferences[edit] This article incorporates public domain material from the Congressional Research Service document "Report for Congress: Agriculture: A Glossary of Terms, Programs, and Laws, 2005 Edition" by Jasper Womach.This article about forestry is a stub
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Alexander Von Humboldt
Friedrich Wilhelm Heinrich Alexander von Humboldt
Alexander von Humboldt
(/ˈhʌmboʊlt/;[5] German: [ˈhʊmbɔlt] ( listen); 14 September 1769 – 6 May 1859) was a Prussian
Prussian
polymath, geographer, naturalist, explorer, and influential proponent of Romantic philosophy and science.[6] He was the younger brother of the Prussian
Prussian
minister, philosopher, and linguist Wilhelm von Humboldt
Wilhelm von Humboldt
(1767–1835).[7][8][9] Humboldt's quantitative work on botanical geography laid the foundation for the field of biogeography. Humboldt's advocacy of long-term systematic geophysical measurement laid the foundation for modern geomagnetic and meteorological monitoring.[10][11] Between 1799 and 1804, Humboldt travelled extensively in Latin America, exploring and describing it for the first time from a modern scientific point of view
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Georg Ludwig Hartig
Georg Ludwig HartigGeorg Ludwig Hartig (September 2, 1764 – February 2, 1837) was a German forester.Contents1 Education 2 Career 3 Sons 4 Works (selection) 5 Literature 6 Notes 7 References 8 External linksEducation[edit] Hartig was born at Gladenbach, in present-day Hesse. After obtaining a practical knowledge of forestry from his uncle at Harzburg, he studied from 1781 to 1783 at the University of Giessen, which had commenced a course of instruction in forestry just a few years earlier, in 1778. Career[edit] In 1786, Hartwig was appointed as Manager of Forests for the Prince of Solms-Braunfels at Hungen, in the Wetterau, Hesse. While in this position, he founded a school for the teaching of forestry, one of the first dedicated schools of forestry in Europe. After a decade in Hungen, in 1797, he received an appointment as Inspector of Forests to the Prince of Orange-Nassau and moved to Dillenburg, continuing his school of forestry there
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Gifford Pinchot
Gifford Pinchot
Gifford Pinchot
(August 11, 1865 – October 4, 1946) was an American forester and politician. Pinchot served as the first Chief of the United States Forest Service
United States Forest Service
from 1905 until his firing in 1910, and was the 28th Governor of Pennsylvania, serving from 1923 to 1927, and again from 1931 to 1935. He was a member of the Republican Party for most of his life, though he also joined the Progressive Party for a brief period. Pinchot is known for reforming the management and development of forests in the United States and for advocating the conservation of the nation's reserves by planned use and renewal. He called it "the art of producing from the forest whatever it can yield for the service of man." Pinchot coined the term conservation ethic as applied to natural resources
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Aldo Leopold
Aldo Leopold
Aldo Leopold
(January 11, 1887 – April 21, 1948) was an American author, philosopher, scientist, ecologist, forester, conservationist, and environmentalist. He was a professor at the University of Wisconsin and is best known for his book A Sand County Almanac
A Sand County Almanac
(1949), which has sold more than two million copies. Leopold was influential in the development of modern environmental ethics and in the movement for wilderness conservation
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John Evelyn
John Evelyn, FRS (31 October 1620 – 27 February 1706) was an English writer, gardener and diarist. Evelyn's diaries, or memoirs, are largely contemporaneous with those of his rival diarist, Samuel Pepys, and cast considerable light on the art, culture and politics of the time (the deaths of Charles I and Oliver Cromwell, the last Great Plague of London, and the Great Fire of London in 1666)
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Rachel Carson
Rachel Louise Carson (May 27, 1907 – April 14, 1964) was an American marine biologist, author, and conservationist whose book Silent Spring
Silent Spring
and other writings are credited with advancing the global environmental movement. Carson began her career as an aquatic biologist in the U.S. Bureau of Fisheries, and became a full-time nature writer in the 1950s. Her widely praised 1951 bestseller The Sea Around Us
The Sea Around Us
won her a U.S. National Book Award,[2] recognition as a gifted writer, and financial security. Her next book, The Edge of the Sea, and the reissued version of her first book, Under the Sea Wind, were also bestsellers. This sea trilogy explores the whole of ocean life from the shores to the depths. Late in the 1950s, Carson turned her attention to conservation, especially some problems that she believed were caused by synthetic pesticides
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Silent Spring
Silent Spring
Silent Spring
is an environmental science book by Rachel Carson.[1] The book was published on 27 September 1962 and it documented the adverse effects on the environment of the indiscriminate use of pesticides. Carson accused the chemical industry of spreading disinformation and public officials of accepting industry claims unquestioningly. In the late 1950s, Carson turned her attention to conservation, especially environmental problems that she believed were caused by synthetic pesticides. The result was Silent Spring
Silent Spring
(1962), which brought environmental concerns to the American public. Silent Spring was met with fierce opposition by chemical companies, but it spurred a reversal in national pesticide policy, led to a nationwide ban on DDT for agricultural uses,[2] and inspired an environmental movement that led to the creation of the U.S
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Kenneth E. Boulding
Kenneth Ewart Boulding (January 18, 1910 – March 18, 1993) was an English-born American economist, educator, peace activist, and interdisciplinary philosopher.[4][5] He published over thirty-six books and over one hundred and twelve articles. Boulding was the author of two Citation Classics: The Image: Knowledge in Life and Society (1956) and Conflict and Defense: A General Theory (1962). He was cofounder of General Systems Theory and founder of numerous ongoing intellectual projects in economics and social science. He was married to Elise M
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Club Of Rome
The Club of Rome
Rome
describes itself as "an organisation of individuals who share a common concern for the future of humanity and strive to make a difference. Our mission is to promote understanding of the global challenges facing humanity and to propose solutions through scientific analysis, communication and advocacy."[1] Founded in 1968 at Accademia dei Lincei
Accademia dei Lincei
in Rome, Italy, the Club of Rome
Rome
consists of current and former heads of state, UN bureaucrats, high-level politicians and government officials, diplomats, scientists, economists, and business leaders from around the globe.[2] It stimulated considerable public attention in 1972 with the first report to the Club of Rome, The Limits to Growth
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Dennis Meadows
Dennis L. Meadows (born June 7, 1942) is an American scientist and Emeritus Professor of Systems Management, and former director of the Institute for Policy and Social Science Research at the University of New Hampshire.[1] He is President of the Laboratory for Interactive Learning and widely known as the co-author of The Limits to Growth.Contents1 Biography 2 Work2.1 Club of Rome 2.2 The Limits to Growth 2.3 The 30-year update3 See also 4 Publications 5 References 6 External linksBiography[edit] Dennis Meadows received a BA from Carleton College, a Ph.D. in Management from the MIT Sloan School of Management, and holds four honorary doctorates. He started working at the faculty of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in the late 1960s.[citation needed] From 1970 to 1972 at MIT he was director of the "Club of Rome Project on the Predicament of Mankind".[2] Further on Meadows has been a tenured professor in faculties of management, engineering, and social sciences
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