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Susan Bysiewicz
Susan Bysiewicz
Susan Bysiewicz
(born September 29, 1961) served as Secretary of the State of Connecticut
Connecticut
from 1999 to 2011. She was briefly a candidate for Governor of Connecticut
Governor of Connecticut
in 2010, before dropping out to run for Connecticut
Connecticut
Attorney General. She was disqualified from running for the office by the Connecticut
Connecticut
Supreme Court and announced in 2011 that she was running for the U.S. Senate to replace the retiring Joe Lieberman
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Linda McMahon
Linda Marie McMahon (née Edwards; born October 4, 1948) is an American professional wrestling magnate and government official serving as the Administrator of the Small Business Administration
Administrator of the Small Business Administration
in the Trump Administration. McMahon was active with WWE
WWE
from 1980 to 2009. During this time, the company grew from a small regional business in the North East to a large multinational corporation. As President and later CEO of the company, she initiated the company's civic programs, Get REAL and Smackdown Your Vote. She occasionally made on-screen appearances, most notably in a wrestling "feud" with her husband which climaxed at WrestleMania X-Seven
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Quinnipiac University
NCAA
NCAA
Division I – MAAC ECAC Hockey Big East
Big East
-Field HockeyNickname BobcatsAffiliations NAICU NEASCSports 21 varsity teams [5]Mascot Boomer the BobcatWebsite https://www.qu.edu Quinnipiac
Quinnipiac
University
University
/ˌkwɪˈnɪpiæk/ is a private, nonsectarian, coeducational university located in Hamden, Connecticut, at the foot of Sleeping Giant State Park
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Secretary Of State (U.S. State Government)
Secretary of state is an official in the state governments of 47 of the 50 states of the United States, as well as Puerto Rico
Puerto Rico
and other U.S. possessions. In Massachusetts, Pennsylvania, and Virginia, this official is called the secretary of the commonwealth. In states that have one, the secretary of state is the chief clerk of the state, and is often the primary custodian of important state records. In the states of Alaska, Hawaii, and Utah, there is no secretary of state; in those states many duties that a secretary of state might normally execute fall within the domain of the lieutenant governor. Like the lieutenant governor, in most states the secretary of state is in the line of succession to succeed the governor, in most cases immediately behind the lieutenant governor
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Primary Election
A primary election is the process by which the general public can indicate their preference for a candidate in an upcoming general election or by-election, thus narrowing the field of candidates. Primaries are used in various countries throughout the world
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Megan's Law
Constitutionality of sex offender registries in the United StatesSupreme Court decisionsSmith v. DoeConnecticut Department of Public Safety v. DoeEffectivenessEffectiveness of sex offender registration policies in the United StatesSocial issuesHomelessnessJulia Tuttle Causeway sex offender colonyMiracle VillagePervert ParkControversial designations as offenderGenarlow WilsonJanet AllisonKevin GillsonReform activismAlliance for Constitutional Sex Offense LawsNational Association for Rational Sexual Offense LawsWomen Against Registry - W.A.R.Movement to reform sex offender laws in the United Statesv t eMegan's Law is the name for a federal law, and informal name for subsequent state laws, in the United States requiring law enforcement authorities to make information available to the public regarding registered sex offenders. Laws were created in response to the murder of Megan Kanka
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General Election
A general election is an election in which all or most members of a given political body are chosen. These are usually held for a nation's primary legislative body, as distinguished from by-elections and local elections. In presidential systems, a general election is a regularly scheduled election where both the president, and either "a class" of or all members of the national legislature are elected at the same time but can also involve special elections held to fill prematurely vacated positions. A general election day may also include elections for local officials. The term originates in the elections in the United Kingdom for the House of Commons.Contents1 India 2 United Kingdom 3 United States 4 Footnotes 5 External linksIndia[edit] Main article: Elections in India The elections held to elect the members of the Lok Sabha after expiry of the Parliamentary Elections
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Candidate
A candidate, or nominee, is the prospective recipient of an award or honor, or a person seeking or being considered for some kind of position; for example:to be elected to an office — in this case a candidate selection procedure occurs. to receive membership in a group"Nomination" is part of the process of selecting a candidate for either election to an office by a political party,[1] or the bestowing of an honor or award. This person is called a "nominee",[2] though nominee often is used interchangeably with "candidate". A presumptive nominee is a person or organization believes that the nomination is inevitable or likely
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Nomination
Nomination is part of the process of selecting a candidate for either election to a public office, or the bestowing of an honor or award. A collection of nominees narrowed from the full list of candidates is a short list.Contents1 Political office 2 Parliamentary procedure2.1 Motions relating to nominations 2.2 Legitimate use of closing nominations3 Awards and honours 4 References 5 External linksPolitical office[edit] In the context of elections for public office, a candidate who has been selected to represent or is endorsed by a political party is said to be the party's nominee. The process of selection may be based on one or more primary elections or by means of a political party convention or caucus, according to the rules of the party and any applicable election laws
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Connecticut Gubernatorial Election, 2006
Jodi Rell RepublicanElected Governor Jodi Rell RepublicanElections in Connecticut Federal governmentPresidential elections1788–89 1792 1796 1800 1804 1808 1812 1816 1820 1824 1828 1832 1836 1840 1844 1848 1852 1856 1860 1864 1868 1872 1876 1880 1884 1888 1892 1896 1900 1904 1908 1912 1916 1920 1924 1928 1932 1936 1940 1944 1948 1952 1956 1960 1964 1968 1972 1976 1980 1984 1988 1992 1996 2000 2004 2008 2012 2016Presidential primariesDemocratic 2008Republican 2008 2012U.S. Senate elections1940 1946 1952 1958 1964 1970 1976 1980 1982 1986 1988 1992 1994 1998 2000 2004 2006 2010 2012 2016 2018U.S. House elections2006 2008 2010 2012 2014 2016 2018 State governmentState elections2010 2014Gubernatorial elections1982 1986 1990 1994 1998 2002 2006 2010 2014 2018Attorney General elections2010State Senate elections2006 2008 2010 2012 2015State House elections2010v t eThe Connecticut gubernatorial election of 2006 occurred on November 7, 2006
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Term Of Office
A term of office is the length of time a person serves in a particular elected office. In many jurisdictions there is a defined limit on how long terms of office may be before the officeholder must be subject to re-election
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Hartford Courant
The Hartford Courant
Hartford Courant
is the largest daily newspaper in the U.S. state of Connecticut, and is often recognized as the oldest continuously published newspaper in the United States. A morning newspaper serving most of the state north of New Haven
New Haven
and east of Waterbury, its headquarters on Broad Street are a short walk from the state capitol. It reports regional news with a chain of bureaus in smaller cities and a series of local editions. Beginning in 2000, it was owned by Tribune Company, which later combined the paper's management and facilities with those of Tribune-owned WTIC-TV
WTIC-TV
in Hartford
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Dannel Malloy
Dannel Patrick Malloy /ˈdænəl məˈlɔɪ/ (born July 21, 1955) is an American politician who is the 88th and current Governor of Connecticut. A member of the Democratic Party, Malloy has served as governor since 2011. He is the former chair of the Democratic Governors Association. Born in Stamford, Connecticut, Malloy is a graduate of Boston College Law School. Malloy began his career as an assistant district attorney in New York in 1980 before moving back to Stamford and entering private practice. He served on the Stamford board of finance from 1984 to 1994 before being elected Mayor of Stamford. He served four terms as mayor from December 1995 to December 2009. Malloy ran unsuccessfully for governor in 2006, losing the Democratic primary to John DeStefano, Jr., the Mayor of New Haven, who was defeated in the general election by incumbent Republican Governor Jodi Rell. He ran again in 2010 and comfortably won the primary, defeating Ned Lamont, the 2006 U.S
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Patronage Politics
Patronage is the support, encouragement, privilege, or financial aid that an organization or individual bestows to another. In the history of art, arts patronage refers to the support that kings, popes, and the wealthy have provided to artists such as musicians, painters, and sculptors. It can also refer to the right of bestowing offices or church benefices, the business given to a store by a regular customer, and the guardianship of saints. The word "patron" derives from the Latin: patronus ("patron"), one who gives benefits to his clients (see Patronage in ancient Rome). In some countries the term is used to describe political patronage, which is the use of state resources to reward individuals for their electoral support
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Thomas C. Foley
Thomas Coleman "Tom" Foley (born January 9, 1952) is an American politician and businessman. He served as the United States Ambassador to Ireland from 2006 to 2009, and was the unsuccessful Republican nominee for Governor of Connecticut in 2010 and 2014.Contents1 Early life and education 2 Career2.1 Private sector 2.2 Public sector 2.3 2010 gubernatorial campaign 2.4 2014 gubernatorial campaign 2.5 After 20143 Personal life 4 References 5 External linksEarly life and education[edit] Foley is one of six children of Catherine Coleman Foley and Gifford Pinchot Foley (both deceased).[1] He went to both Phillips Academy Andover and Kent School and then received a B.A. in Economics from Harvard and an M.B.A. from Harvard Business School. He is no relation to former U.S. House Speaker Tom Foley. Career[edit] Private sector[edit] Foley first worked at McKinsey & Company and then at Citicorp Venture Capital
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Associated Press
The Associated Press
Associated Press
(AP) is a U.S.-based not-for-profit news agency headquartered in New York City. Founded in 1846, it operates as a cooperative, unincorporated association. The AP is owned by its contributing newspapers and radio and television stations in the United States, all of which contribute stories to the AP and use material written by its staff journalists. AP's mission is to inform the world with accurate, fair, unbiased reporting. Its Statement of News Values and Principles[3] spells out its standards and practices. AP has earned 52 Pulitzer Prizes, including 31 for photography, since the award was established in 1917. AP has counted the vote in U.S. elections since 1848, including national, state and local races down to the legislative level in all 50 states, along with key ballot measures
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