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Surya Siddhanta
The Surya
Surya
Siddhanta is the name of a Sanskrit treatise in Indian astronomy from late 4th-century or early 5th-century CE.[1][3] The text survives in several versions, was cited and extensively quoted in a 6th-century text, was likely revised for several centuries under the same title.[4][3] It has fourteen chapters.[5] A 12th-century manuscript of the text was translated by Burgess in 1860.[2] The
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Brahma
Brahma
Brahma
(/ˈbrəhmɑː/; Sanskrit: ब्रह्मा, IAST: Brahmā) is a creator god in Hinduism. His consort is the goddess Saraswati[4] and he is the father of the Prajapatis.[5]He is depicted in Hindu
Hindu
iconography with four faces[6] and is also known as Svayambhu (self-born)[7] and Vāgīśa (Lord of speech and the creator of the four Vedas, one from each of his mouths).[6][8] Brahma
Brahma
is sometimes identified with the Vedic god Prajapati, as well as linked to Kama
Kama
and Hiranyagarbha (the cosmic egg)[9][10]. He is more prominently mentioned in the post-Vedic Hindu
Hindu
epics and the mythologies in the Puranas
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Planet
Shown in order from the Sun
Sun
and in true color. Sizes are not to scale.A planet is an astronomical body orbiting a star or stellar remnant thatis massive enough to be rounded by its own gravity, is not massive enough to cause thermonuclear fusion, and has cleared its neighbouring region of planetesimals.[a][1][2]The term planet is ancient, with ties to history, astrology, science, mythology, and religion. Several planets in the Solar System
Solar System
can be seen with the naked eye. These were regarded by many early cultures as divine, or as emissaries of deities. As scientific knowledge advanced, human perception of the planets changed, incorporating a number of disparate objects. In 2006, the International Astronomical Union
International Astronomical Union
(IAU) officially adopted a resolution defining planets within the Solar System
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Alexander The Great
Alexander
Alexander
III of Macedon
Macedon
(Greek: Αλέξανδρος Γʹ ὁ Μακεδών; 20/21 July 356 BC – 10/11 June 323 BC), commonly known as Alexander
Alexander
the Great (Ancient Greek: Ἀλέξανδρος ὁ Μέγας, romanized: Aléxandros ho Mégas), was a king (basileus) of the ancient Greek kingdom of Macedon[a] and a member of the Argead
Argead
dynasty. He was born in Pella
Pella
in 356 BC and succeeded his father Philip II to the throne at the age of 20
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Nasik
Nashik
Nashik
(/ˈnʌʃɪk/ ( listen))[3] is an ancient city in the northwest region of Maharashtra
Maharashtra
at India. Nashik
Nashik
is best known for being one of Hindu pilgrimage sites, that of Kumbh Mela
Kumbh Mela
which is held every 12 years.Contents1 Geography 2 Climate 3 Civic administration3.1 Court 3.2 Solid waste management4 Demographics 5 Art and culture5.1 Trirashmi caves6 Dams 7 Culture7.1 Kumbh Mela8 Economy8.1 Agriculture 8.2 Rainwater harvesting9 Industry9.1 Wine industry10 Education 11 See also 12 People from Nashik 13 References 14 External linksGeography[edit] Nashik
Nashik
is the third largest city of Maharashtra
Maharashtra
after Mumbai
Mumbai
& Pune
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Babylon
Babylon
Babylon
(𒆍𒀭𒊏𒆠KAN4.DIĜIR.RAKI Akkadian: Bābili(m); Aramaic: בבל, Babel; Arabic: بَابِل‎, Bābil; Hebrew: בָּבֶל‎, Bavel; Classical Syriac: ܒܒܠ‎, Bāwēl) was a key kingdom in ancient Mesopotamia
Mesopotamia
from the 18th to 6th centuries BC. The city was built on the Euphrates
Euphrates
river and divided in equal parts along its left and right banks, with steep embankments to contain the river's seasonal floods
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Late Antiquity
Late antiquity
Late antiquity
is a periodization used by historians to describe the time of transition from classical antiquity to the Middle Ages
Middle Ages
in mainland Europe, the Mediterranean
Mediterranean
world, and the Near East. The development of the periodization has generally been accredited to historian Peter Brown, after the publication of his seminal work The World of Late Antiquity (1971). Precise boundaries for the period are a continuing matter of debate, but Brown proposes a period between the 3rd and 8th centuries AD. Generally, it can be thought of as from the end of the Roman Empire's Crisis of the Third Century
Crisis of the Third Century
(c. 235 – 284) to, in the East, the Muslim conquests
Muslim conquests
in the mid-7th century
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History Of Science
The history of science is the study of the development of science and scientific knowledge, including both the natural and social sciences (the history of the arts and humanities is termed history of scholarship). Science
Science
is a body of empirical, theoretical, and practical knowledge about the natural world, produced by scientists who emphasize the observation, explanation, and prediction of real-world phenomena
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Al-Mansur
Al-Mansur
Al-Mansur
or Abu Ja'far Abdallah ibn Muhammad
Muhammad
al-Mansur (95 AH – 158 AH (714 AD– 6 October 775 AD);[1] Arabic: أبو جعفر عبدالله بن محمد المنصور‎) was the second Abbasid Caliph
Caliph
reigning from 136 AH to 158 AH (754 AD – 775 AD)[2][3] and succeeding his brother Abu al-'Abbas al-Saffah
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Shloka
Shloka (Sanskrit: श्लोक śloka; meaning "song", from the root śru, "hear"[1]) is a category of verse line developed from the Vedic Anustubh poetic meter. It is the basis for Indian epic verse, and may be considered the Indian verse form par excellence, occurring, as it does, far more frequently than any other meter in classical Sanskrit
Sanskrit
poetry.[1] The Mahabharata
Mahabharata
and Ramayana, for example, are written almost exclusively in shlokas.[2] The traditional view is that this form of verse was involuntarily composed by Valmiki
Valmiki
in grief, the author of the Ramayana, on seeing a hunter shoot down one of two birds in love.[3] The shloka is treated as a couplet. Each hemistich (half-verse) of 16 syllables, composed of two Pādas of eight syllables, can take either a pathyā ("normal") form or one of several vipulā ("extended") forms
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Gnomon
A gnomon ([ˈnoʊmɒn], from Greek γνώμων, gnōmōn, literally: "one that knows or examines"[1][2]) is the part of a sundial that casts a shadow. The term has come to be used for a variety of purposes in mathematics and other fields.Contents1 History 2 Pinhole gnomons 3 Orientation 4 In popular culture 5 See also 6 Footnotes 7 References 8 External linksHistory[edit]A gnomon as in Euclid book IIA painted stick dating from 2300 BC was excavated at the astronomical site of Taosi
Taosi
is the oldest gnomon known in China.[3] The gnomon was widely used in ancient China from the second century BC onward in order determine the changes in seasons, orientation, and geographical latitude. The ancient Chinese used shadow measurements for creating calendars that are mentioned in several ancient texts
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Astrology
Expand list for reference▼ Astrology► Astrology
Astrology
images► Astrology
Astrology
stubs► Astrologers► Astrological ages► Astrological data collectors► Astrological organizations► Astrological signs► History of astrology►
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Mercury (planet)
Mercury is the smallest and innermost planet in the Solar System. Its orbital period around the Sun
Sun
of 87.97 days is the shortest of all the planets in the Solar System. It is named after the Roman deity Mercury, the messenger of the gods. Like Venus, Mercury orbits the Sun
Sun
within Earth's orbit as an inferior planet, and never exceeds 28° away from the Sun. When viewed from Earth, this proximity to the Sun
Sun
means the planet can only be seen near the western or eastern horizon during the early evening or early morning. At this time it may appear as a bright star-like object, but is often far more difficult to observe than Venus
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Saturn
by volume:6999963000000000000♠96.3%±2.4% hydrogen (H 2)6998325000000000000♠3.25%±2.4% helium (He)6997450000000000000♠0.45%±0.2% methane (CH 4)6996125000000000000♠0.0125%±0.0075% ammonia (NH 3)6996109999999999999♠0.0110%±0.0058% hydrogen deuteride (HD)6994700000000000000♠0.0007%±0.00015% ethane (C 2H 6)Ices:ammonia (NH 3) water (H 2O) ammonium hydrosulfide (NH 4SH) Saturn
Saturn
is the sixth planet from the Sun
Sun
and the second-largest in the Solar System, after Jupiter
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Venus
Venus
Venus
is the second planet from the Sun, orbiting it every 224.7 Earth days.[12] It has the longest rotation period (243 days) of any planet in the Solar System
Solar System
and rotates in the opposite direction to most other planets (meaning the Sun
Sun
would rise in the west and set in the east).[13] It does not have any natural satellites. It is named after the Roman goddess of love and beauty
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Jupiter
by volume:6999890000000000000♠89%±2.0% hydrogen (H 2)6999100000000000000♠10%±2.0% helium (He)6997300000000000000♠0.3%±0.1% methane (CH 4)6996259999999999999♠0.026%±0.004% ammonia (NH 3)6995280000000000000♠0.0028%±0.001% hydrogen deuteride (HD)6994599999999999999♠0.0006%±0.0002% ethane (C 2H 6)6994400000000000000♠0.0004%±0.0004% water (H 2O)Ices:ammonia (NH 3) water (H 2O) ammonium hydrosulfide (NH 4SH) Jupiter
Jupiter
is the fifth planet from the Sun
Sun
and the largest in the Solar System. It is a giant planet with a mass one-thousandth that of the Sun, but two-and-a-half times that of all the other planets in the Solar System
Solar System
combined. Jupiter
Jupiter
and Saturn
Saturn
are gas giants; the other two giant planets, Uranus
Uranus
and Neptune
Neptune
are ice giants
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