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Supreme Federal Tribunal
The Supreme Federal Court
Supreme Federal Court
(Portuguese: Supremo Tribunal Federal, [suˈpɾẽmu tɾibuˈnaw fedeˈɾaw], abbreviated STF) is the supreme court (court of last resort) of Brazil, serving primarily as the Constitutional Court
Constitutional Court
of the country. It is the highest court of law in Brazil
Brazil
for constitutional issues and its rulings cannot be appealed. On questions involving exclusively non-constitutional issues, regarding federal laws, the highest court is, by rule, the Superior Court of Justice. Alongside its appeal competence, mostly by the Extraordinary Appeal (Recurso Extraordinário), the Court has a small range of cases of original jurisdiction, including the power of judicial review, judging the constitutionality of laws passed by the National Congress, through a Direct Action of Unconstitutionality (Ação Direta de Inconstitucionalidade, or ADI)
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Praça Dos Três Poderes
Praça dos Três Poderes
Praça dos Três Poderes
(Portuguese pronunciation: [ˈpɾasɐ dus ˈtɾes poˈdeɾis]; Three Powers Plaza) is a plaza in Brasília, the capital of Brazil
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Brazilian Municipal Elections, 2008
Brazilian may refer to anything of or relating to Brazil
Brazil
and may also refer directly to: Brazilian barbecue, known as churrasco
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Administrative Divisions Of Brazil
Administration
Administration
may refer to: Management
Management
of organizations[edit]Management, the act of directing people towards accomplishing a goal
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States Of Brazil
The Federative Republic of Brazil
Brazil
is a union of 27 Federative Units (Portuguese: Unidades Federativas, UF): 26 states (estados) and one federal district (distrito federal), where the federal capital, Brasília, is located
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Governor (Brazil)
In Brazil, the governors are the chief executives of the states of Brazil. Current governors[edit]State Governor Party Vice Governor PartyAcre Tião VianaPT Nazareth LambertPTAlagoas Renan FilhoMDB Luciano BarbosaMDBAmapá Waldez GóesPDT Papaleo PaesPPAmazonas Amazonino MendesPDT Bosco SaraivaPSDBBahia Rui CostaPT João LeãoPPCeará Camilo SantanaPT Izolda CelaPROSDistrito Federal Rodrigo RollembergPSB Renato SantanaPSDEspírito Santo Paulo HartungMDB César ColnagoPSDBGoiás Marconi PerilloPSDB José ElitonDEMMaranhão Flávio DinoPCdoB Carlos BrandãoPSDBMato Grosso Pedro TaquesPSDB Carlos FávaroPPMato Grosso do Sul Reinaldo AzambujaPSDB Rosiane Modesto de OliveiraPSDBMinas Gerais Fernando PimentelPT Antônio And
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State Senator (Brazil)
A senate is a deliberative assembly, often the upper house or chamber of a bicameral legislature or parliament. The name comes from the ancient Roman Senate
Roman Senate
(Latin: Senatus), so-called as an assembly of the senior (Latin: senex meaning "the elder" or "old man") and therefore allegedly wiser and more experienced members of the society or ruling class. Thus, the literal meaning of the word "senate" is Assembly of Elders. Many countries have an assembly named a senate, composed of senators who may be elected, appointed, have inherited the title, or gained membership by other methods, depending on the country
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Municipalities Of Brazil
The municipalities of Brazil
Brazil
(Portuguese: Municípios do Brasil) are administrative divisions of the Brazilian states. At present, Brazil has 5,570 municipalities, making the average municipality population 34,361. The average state in Brazil
Brazil
has 214 municipalities. Roraima
Roraima
is the least subdivided state, with 15 municipalities, while Minas Gerais is the most subdivided state, with 853. The Federal District, where the federal capital, Brasília, is located, cannot be divided into municipalities (according to the Brazilian Constitution, the Federal District assumes the same constitutional and legal powers, attributions and obligations of the states and municipalities)
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Elections In Brazil
Brazil
Brazil
elects on the national level a head of state – the president – and a legislature. The president is elected to a four-year term by absolute majority vote through a two-round system. The National Congress (Congresso Nacional) has two chambers. The Chamber of Deputies (Câmara dos Deputados) has 513 members, elected to a four-year term by proportional representation. The Federal Senate (Senado Federal) has 81 members, elected to an eight-year term, with elections every four years for alternatively one-third and two-third of the seats
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Brazilian General Election, 2010
Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva PTElected President Dilma Rousseff PTBrazilThis article is part of a series on the politics and government of BrazilExecutivePresident (list)Michel TemerVice PresidentVacantCabinet Attorney General of the Union National Defense Council Federal institutionsLegislativeFederal Senate Chamber of DeputiesCourt of Accounts of the UnionJudiciarySupreme Court Superior Court of Justice Superior Labor Court Superior Electoral Court Superior Military Court National Justice CouncilLawConstitution (history) Anti-discrimination Human rights LGBT rightsAdministrative divisionsStatesState governors State SenatorsMunicipalitiesRecent electionsGeneral: 2010 2014 2018Municipal: 2008 2012 2016Referendums: 1993 2005Political partiesForeign relationsOther countries Atlasv t eThe fi
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Brazilian General Election, 2014
Dilma Rousseff PTElected President Dilma Rousseff PTGeneral elections were held in Brazil
Brazil
on 5 October 2014 to elect the President, the National Congress, state governors and state legislatures.[1] As no candidate in the presidential and several gubernatorial elections received more than 50% of the vote, a second-round runoff was held on 26 October.[1] In the first round of voting Dilma Rousseff
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Brazilian General Election, 2018
Michel Temer MDBGeneral elections are scheduled to be held in Brazil
Brazil
in October 2018 to elect the President and Vice President, the National Congress, state Governors and Vice Governors and state Legislative Assemblies. The 2014 elections saw Workers' Party candidate Dilma Rousseff re-elected as President in the second round with 51.6% of the vote, defeating Aécio Neves
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Brazilian Municipal Elections, 2012
The Brazilian municipal elections of 2012 took place on October 7 and on October 28 (for cities with more than 200,000 voters, where the second round is available).[1] Over 138 million voters chose mayors, deputy mayors and city councillors for the 5,568 municipalities of Brazil.[1][2] These were the first elections in which the recently registered parties Partido Pátria Livre (PPL) and Partido Social Democrático (PSD) participated; they were both recognized by the Supreme Electoral Court
Supreme Electoral Court
(Tribunal Superior Eleitoral – TSE) in 2011.[3] Po
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Anti-discrimination Laws In Brazil
Anti-discrimination laws in Brazil
Brazil
are present in the Constitution of Brazil,[1] in the labour law,[2] in the child and adolescent law,[3] in the ageing law,[4] and in the penal code.[5] The Brazilian Constitution prohibits all forms of discrimination (age, race, color, national origin, disability, religion, sex, marital status, political affiliation, pregnancy, and citizenship) by federal and state governments and the country's population.[6]Contents1 Constitution1.1 Constitutional preamble 1.2 Constitutional state principles 1.3 Constitutional state objectives 1.4 Constitutional rights
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Brazilian Municipal Elections, 2016
The Brazilian municipal elections of 2016 took place on 2 October 2016 and on 30 October 2016 (for cities with more than 200,000 voters, where the second round is available).[1] Electors chose mayors, vice-mayors and city councillors of all 5,568 cities of the country. The partisan conventions took place between 20 July and 5 August.[2] The party political broadcast started in 26 August and eneded in 29 September.[2] Until 2012, on Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays there was the broadcast for candidates to city halls, 30 minutes long. The broadcasts for candidates for city councils were broadcast on Tuesdays, Thursdays and Saturdays, also 30 minutes long. At least 97 cities had only one candidate for mayor in these elections
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Brazilian Constitutional Referendum, 1993
The 1993 Brazilian constitutional referendum was held on April 21, 1993 to determine the form of government of the country.[1] After the re-democratization of Brazil, an article in the new Constitution determined the holding of a referendum for voters to decide if the country should have a republican or a monarchical form of Government, and if the system of Government should be that of a presidential Executive or that of parliamentary government. The Constitution further specified that Congress, sitting in joint session, would be empowered to effect a revision of the Constitution in 1994 by a mere absolute majority, instead of the qualified majority procedure with separate votes in both Houses of Congress that is usually required for constitutional amendments; any change in the constitutional regime of Government decided during the referendum would be adopted during the said constitutional revision. Federal Law n° 8.624, signed into law by President
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