HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

Supply Creates Its Own Demand
"Supply creates its own demand" is the formulation of Say's law. The rejection of this doctrine is a central component of The General Theory of Employment, Interest and Money (1936) and a central tenet of Keynesian economics. Keynes's rejection of Say's law has on the whole been accepted within mainstream economics since the 1940s and 1950s in the neoclassical synthesis, but debate continues between Keynesian economists and neoclassical economists (see saltwater and freshwater economics). Keynes's interpretation is rejected by many economists as a misinterpretation or caricature of Say's law — see Say's law: Keynes vs
[...More...]

"Supply Creates Its Own Demand" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

James Mill
James Mill
James Mill
(born James Milne,[1] 6 April 1773 – 23 June 1836[2]) was a Scottish historian, economist, political theorist, and philosopher. He is counted among the founders of the Ricardian school of economics.[3] His son, John Stuart Mill, was also a noted philosopher of liberalism, utilitarianism and the civilizing mission of the British Empire. Although he never set foot in India at any time in his life, James Mill took upon himself the task of writing the monumental History of British India, a classic of colonial self-congratulation which contains a complete denunciation and rejection of Indian culture and civilisation and wh
[...More...]

"James Mill" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

Vela Velupillai
Kumaraswamy (Vela) Velupillai (born 1947) is an academic economist and a Senior Visiting Professor at the Madras School of Economics
Madras School of Economics
and was, formerly, (Distinguished) Professor of Economics at the New School for Social Research in New York City and Professore di Chiara Fama in the Department of Economics at the University of Trento, Italy.[1]Contents1 Current work 2 Education 3 Academic posts 4 Influences 5 Key books 6 Main articles 7 International Awards, Fellowships, Memberships & Prizes 8 Distinguished students 9 ReferencesCurrent work[edi
[...More...]

"Vela Velupillai" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992
[...More...]

"Special" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Mainstream Economics
Mainstream economics
Mainstream economics
is the body of knowledge, theories, and models of economics, as taught across prominent universities, that are widely accepted by scholars in the field. It can be contrasted to heterodox economics, which encompasses various schools or approaches that are only accepted by their expositors, with little influence on the majority of academic economists
[...More...]

"Mainstream Economics" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

Neoclassical Synthesis
The neoclassical synthesis was a post- World War II
World War II
academic movement in economics that worked towards absorbing the macroeconomic thought of John Maynard Keynes
John Maynard Keynes
into neoclassical economics.[1] The resultant macroeconomic theories and models are termed Neo-Keynesian economics. Mainstream economics
Mainstream economics
is largely dominated by the synthesis, being largely Keynesian in macroeconomics and neoclassical in microeconomics.[2] Much of Neo-Keynesian economic theory was developed by John Hicks and Maurice Allais, and popularized by the mathematical economist Paul Samuelson
[...More...]

"Neoclassical Synthesis" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Neoclassical Economics
Neoclassical economics
Neoclassical economics
is an approach to economics focusing on the determination of goods, outputs, and income distributions in markets through supply and demand
[...More...]

"Neoclassical Economics" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Saltwater And Freshwater Economics
In economics, the freshwater school (or sometimes sweetwater school) comprises US-based macroeconomists who, in the early 1970s, challenged the prevailing consensus in macroeconomics research. A key element of their approach was the argument that macroeconomics had to be dynamic and based on how individuals and institutions interact in markets and on how they make decisions under uncertainty.[1] This new approach to macroeconomics was centered in the faculties of Carnegie Mellon University, the University of Chicago, New York University, Cornell University, the University of Minnesota, and the University of Rochester. They were called the "freshwater school" because Pittsburgh, Chicago, Rochester, Minneapolis, etc. are located nearer to the North American Great Lakes.[1] The established methodological approach to macroeconomic research was primarily defended by economists at the universities and other institutions located near the east and west coast of the United States
[...More...]

"Saltwater And Freshwater Economics" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Supply-side Economics
Supply-side economics
Supply-side economics
is a macroeconomic theory that argues economic growth can be most effectively created by lowering taxes and decreasing regulation.[1][2] According to supply-side economics, consumers will then benefit from a greater supply of goods and services at lower prices and employment will increase.[3] It was started by economist Robert Mundell
Robert Mundell
during the Ronald Reagan administration. The Laffer curve
Laffer curve
is one of the main theoretical constructs of supply-side economics, the idea that lower tax rates when tax level is too high will actually boost government revenue because of higher economic growth.[4] The term "supply-side economics" was thought for some time to have been coined by journalist Jude Wanniski in 1975, but according to Robert D. Atkinson
Robert D

[...More...]

"Supply-side Economics" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

John Stuart Mill
John Stuart Mill
John Stuart Mill
(20 May 1806 – 8 May 1873) was a British philosopher, political economist and civil servant. One of the most influential thinkers in the history of liberalism, he contributed widely to social theory, political theory and political economy. Dubbed "the most influential English-speaking philosopher of the nineteenth century",[6] Mill's conception of liberty justified the freedom of the individual in opposition to unlimited state and social control.[7] Mill was a proponent of utilitarianism, an ethical theory developed by his predecessor Jeremy Bentham
[...More...]

"John Stuart Mill" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

International Standard Book Number
"ISBN" redirects here. For other uses, see ISBN (other).International Standard Book
Book
NumberA 13-digit ISBN, 978-3-16-148410-0, as represented by an EAN-13 bar codeAcronym ISBNIntroduced 1970; 48 years ago (1970)Managing organisation International ISBN AgencyNo. of digits 13 (formerly 10)Check digit Weighted sumExample 978-3-16-148410-0Website www.isbn-international.orgThe International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a unique[a][b] numeric commercial book identifier. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each edition and variation (except reprintings) of a book. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book would each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is 13 digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007, and 10 digits long if assigned before 2007
[...More...]

"International Standard Book Number" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Principles Of Political Economy
Principles of Political Economy
Principles of Political Economy
(1848) by John Stuart Mill
John Stuart Mill
was one of the most important economics or political economy textbooks of the mid-nineteenth century.[1] It was revised until its seventh edition in 1871,[2] shortly before Mill's death in 1873, and republished in numerous other editions.[3] Beside discussing descriptive issues such as which nations tended to benefit more in a system of trade based on comparative advantage (Mill's answer: those with more elastic demands for other countries' goods), the work also discussed normative issues such as ideal systems of political economy, critiquing proposed systems such as communism and socialism.[4] Along with A System of Logic, Principles of Political Economy
Principles of Political Economy
established Mill's reputation as a leading public intellectual
[...More...]

"Principles Of Political Economy" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Aggregate Demand
In macroeconomics, aggregate demand (AD) or domestic final demand (DFD) is the total demand for final goods and services in an economy at a given time.[1] It specifies the amounts of goods and services that will be purchased at all possible price levels.[2] This is the demand for the gross domestic product of a country. It is often called effective demand, though at other times this term is distinguished. The aggregate demand curve is plotted with real output on the horizontal axis and the price level on the vertical axis. It is downward sloping as a result of three distinct effects: Pigou's wealth effect, Keynes' interest rate effect and the Mundell–Fleming exchange-rate effect
[...More...]

"Aggregate Demand" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Aggregate Supply
In economics, aggregate supply (AS) or domestic final supply (DFS) is the total supply of goods and services that firms in a national economy plan on selling during a specific time period. It is the total amount of goods and services that firms are willing and able to sell at a given price level in an economy.[citation needed]Contents1 Analysis 2 Different scopes 3 See also 4 References 5 External linksAnalysis[edit] There are two main reasons why the amount of aggregate output supplied might rise as P rises, i.e., why the AS curve is upward sloping:The short run AS curve is drawn given some nominal variables such as the nominal wage rate, which is assumed fixed in the short run. Thus, a higher price level P implies a lower real wage rate and thus an incentive to produce more output
[...More...]

"Aggregate Supply" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Oral Tradition
Oral tradition, or oral lore, is a form of human communication where in knowledge, art, ideas and cultural material is received, preserved and transmitted orally from one generation to another.[1][2][3] The transmission is through speech or song and may include folktales, ballads, chants, prose or verses. In this way, it is possible for a society to transmit oral history, oral literature, oral law and other knowledge across generations without a writing system, or in parallel to a writing system
[...More...]

"Oral Tradition" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Joan Robinson
Joan Violet Robinson FBA (31 October 1903 – 5 August 1983), previously Joan Violet Maurice, was a British economist well known for her wide-ranging contributions to economic theory. She was a central figure in what became known as post-Keynesian economics.Contents1 Biography 2 Family 3 Recognition 4 Major works4.1 Texts for the lay reader5 See also 6 References 7 Further reading 8 External linksBiography[edit] Before leaving to fight in the Second Boer War, Joan Maurice's father married Margaret Helen Marsh, the daughter of Frederick Howard Marsh, and the sister of Edward Marsh, at St George's, Hanover Square.[1] Joan Maurice was born in 1903, a year after her father's return from Africa. She studied economics at Girton College, Cambridge, and while there came under the influence of Maurice Dobb, a member of the Communist Party of Great Britain.[2] "Dobb was probably the first academic in Britain to carry a Communist Party membership card
[...More...]

"Joan Robinson" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse
.