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Superhero
A superhero (sometimes rendered super-hero or super hero) is a type of heroic stock character, usually possessing supernatural or superhuman powers, who is dedicated to fighting crime, protecting the public, and usually battling supervillains
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Rogues Gallery
A rogues' gallery (or rogues gallery) is a police collection of pictures or photographs of criminals and suspects kept for identification purposes.[1] The term is also used figuratively for any group of shady characters or the line-up of "mugshot" photographs that might be displayed in the halls of a dormitory or workplace or on an online mugshot publishing website.[citation needed]Contents1 History1.1 In popular culture2 See also 3 ReferencesHistory[edit] In 1855, Allan Pinkerton
Allan Pinkerton
founded the Pinkerton National Detective Agency. Pinkerton devised the Rogues’ Gallery [2] — a compilation of descriptions, methods of operation (modus operandi), hiding places, and names of criminals and their associates. Inspector Thomas Byrnes of the late-19th-century New York City Police Department popularized the term with his collection of photographs of known criminals, which was used for witness identification
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Robin Hood
Robin Hood
Robin Hood
is a legendary heroic outlaw originally depicted in English folklore and subsequently featured in literature and film. According to legend, he was a highly skilled archer and swordsman. In some versions of the legend he is depicted as being of noble birth, and having fought in the Crusades
Crusades
before returning to England
England
to find his lands have been taken by the Sheriff. In other versions this is not the case and he is instead born into the yeoman class. Traditionally depicted dressed in Lincoln green, he is said to have robbed from the rich and given to the poor. Through retellings, additions, and variations a body of familiar characters associated with Robin Hood
Robin Hood
have been created. These include his paramour, Maid Marian, his band of outlaws, the Merry Men, and his chief opponent, the Sheriff of Nottingham
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Patoruzú
Patoruzú
Patoruzú
is a comic character created in 1928 by Dante Quinterno and is considered the most popular hero of Argentine comics.[1][2] Patoruzú
Patoruzú
is a wealthy Tehuelche cacique with great estate properties in Patagonia, and possesses both superhuman physical strength and a charitable yet naive heart
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Wolverine (character)
Wolverine
Wolverine
(born James Howlett[1] commonly known as Logan and sometimes as Weapon X) is a fictional character appearing in American comic books published by Marvel Comics, mostly in association with the X-Men. He is a mutant who possesses animal-keen senses, enhanced physical capabilities, powerful regenerative ability known as a healing factor, and three retractable claws in each hand. Wolverine has been depicted variously as a member of the X-Men, Alpha Flight, and the Avengers. The character appeared in the last panel of The Incredible Hulk #180 before having a larger role in #181 (cover-dated Nov. 1974)
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Fiction
Fiction
Fiction
is a story or setting that is derived from imagination—in other words, not based strictly on history or fact.[1][2][3] Fiction can be expressed in a variety of formats, including writings, live performances, films, television programs, animations, video games, and role-playing games, though the term originally and most commonly refers to the narrative forms of literature (see literary fiction),[4] including novels, novellas, short stories, and plays. Fiction
Fiction
is occasionally used in its narrowest sense to mean simply any "literary narrative".[5] A work of fiction is an act of creative imagination, so its total faithfulness to the real-world is not typically assumed by its audience.[6] Therefore, fiction is not commonly expected to present only characters who are actual people or descriptions that are factually accurate
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Phenomena
A phenomenon (Greek: φαινόμενον, phainómenon, from the verb phainein, to show, shine, appear, to be manifest or manifest itself, plural phenomena)[1] is any thing which manifests itself. Phenomena are often, but not always, understood as "things that appear" or "experiences" for a sentient being, or in principle may be so. The term came into its modern philosophical usage through Immanuel Kant, who contrasted it with the noumenon. In contrast to a phenomenon, a noumenon cannot be directly observed. Kant was heavily influenced by Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz
Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz
in this part of his philosophy, in which phenomenon and noumenon serve as interrelated technical terms. Far predating this, the ancient Greek Pyrrhonist philosopher Sextus Empiricus
Sextus Empiricus
also used phenomenon and noumenon as interrelated technical terms. Cloud chamber
Cloud chamber
phenomena
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Philip Wylie
Philip Gordon Wylie (May 12, 1902 – October 25, 1971) was an American author of works ranging from pulp science fiction, mysteries, social diatribes and satire, to ecology and the threat of nuclear holocaust.Contents1 Early life and career 2 Personal life 3 Death 4 Bibliography4.1 Novels 4.2 Short stories4.2.1 "Crunch and Des" collections4.3 Non-fiction 4.4 Essays/articles5 Films 6 TV series 7 References 8 External linksEarly life and career[edit] Born in Beverly, Massachusetts, Wylie was the son of Presbyterian minister Edmund Melville Wylie and the former Edna Edwards, a novelist, who died when Philip was five years old. His family moved to Montclair, New Jersey, and he later attended Princeton University
Princeton University
from 1920–1923. A writer of fiction and nonfiction, his output included hundreds of articles, novels, serials, short stories, syndicated newspaper columns, and works of social criticism
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Merriam-Webster
Merriam–Webster, Incorporated, is an American company that publishes reference books, especially known for its dictionaries. In 1828, George and Charles Merriam founded the company as G & C Merriam Co. in Springfield, Massachusetts. In 1843, after Noah Webster died, the company bought the rights to An American Dictionary
Dictionary
of the English Language from Webster's estate. All Merriam–Webster dictionaries trace their lineage to this source. In 1964, Encyclopædia Britannica, Inc.
Encyclopædia Britannica, Inc.
acquired Merriam–Webster, Inc. as a subsidiary. The company adopted its current name in 1982.[1][2]Contents1 Origins1.1 Noah Webster 1.2 Merriam as publisher2 Services 3 Pronunciation guides 4 Writing entries 5 See also 6 References 7 External linksOrigins[edit] Noah Webster[edit] In 1806, Webster published his first dictionary, A Compendious Dictionary
Dictionary
of the English Language
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Vigilantes
A vigilante (/ˌvɪdʒɪˈlænti/, /ˌvɪdʒɪˈlænteɪ/; Spanish: [bixiˈlante]; Portuguese: [viʒiˈlɐ̃t(ɨ)], [viʒiˈlɐ̃tʃi]) is a civilian or organization acting in a law enforcement capacity (or in the pursuit of self-perceived justice) without legal authority.Contents1 Vigilante
Vigilante
conduct 2 History2.1 Colonial era in America 2.2 India 2.3 19th century 2.4 20th century 2.5 21st century3 See also 4 References 5 External links Vigilante
Vigilante
conduct[edit] " Vigilante
Vigilante
justice" is often rationalized by the concept that proper legal forms of criminal punishment are either nonexistent, insufficient, or inefficient
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Spirit (comics)
The Spirit is a fictional masked crimefighter created by cartoonist Will Eisner. He first appeared June 2, 1940, as the main feature of a 16-page, tabloid-sized, newsprint comic book insert distributed in the Sunday edition of Register and Tribune Syndicate newspapers; it was ultimately carried by 20 Sunday newspapers, with a combined circulation of five million copies during the 1940s. "The Spirit Section", as the insert was popularly known, continued until October 5, 1952. It generally included two other four-page strips (initially Mr. Mystic
Mr. Mystic
and Lady Luck), plus filler material
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Kamishibai
Kamishibai
Kamishibai
(Japanese: 紙芝居, "paper play") is a form of Japanese street theatre and storytelling that was popular during the Depression of the 1930s and the post-war period in Japan
Japan
until the advent of television during the twentieth century
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The Scarlet Pimpernel
The Scarlet Pimpernel
The Scarlet Pimpernel
is the first novel in a series of historical fiction by Baroness Orczy, published in 1905. It was written after her stage play of the same title enjoyed a long run in London, having opened in Nottingham in 1903. The novel is set during the Reign of Terror
Reign of Terror
following the start of the French Revolution. The title is the nom de guerre of its hero and protagonist, a chivalrous Englishman who rescues aristocrats before they are sent to the guillotine. Sir Percy Blakeney leads a double life: apparently nothing more than a wealthy fop, but in reality a formidable swordsman and a quick-thinking escape artist. The band of gentlemen who assist him are the only ones who know of his secret identity. He is known by his symbol, a simple flower, the scarlet pimpernel (Anagallis arvensis). Marguerite Blakeney, his French wife, does not share his secret
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Flame (comics)
The Flame is a fictional superhero that appeared in American comic books published by Fox Feature Syndicate. The Flame first appeared in Wonderworld Comics #3 (July 1939) and was created by writer Will Eisner and artist Lou Fine.Contents1 Publication history 2 Fictional character biography 3 Powers and abilities 4 2010s 5 ReferencesPublication history[edit] The Flame's first appearance was in Fox's Wonderworld Comics #3, dated July 1939, (issues #1 & #2 being titled Wonder Comics). The Flame gained his own title in the summer of 1940; which ran for eight issues until January 1942. He was one of the titular Big 3, appearing in that periodical alongside Blue Beetle
Blue Beetle
and Samson. Fox Publications folded in 1942, being forced to declare involuntary bankruptcy owing its creditors some $175,000. Fictional character biography[edit] The Flame's secret identity is Gary Preston
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Fox Feature Syndicate
Fox Feature Syndicate[1] (also known as Fox Comics and Fox Publications) was a comic book publisher from early in the period known to fans and historians as the Golden Age of Comic Books. Founded by entrepreneur Victor S. Fox, it produced such titles as Blue Beetle, Fantastic Comics and Mystery Men Comics. It is unrelated to the company Fox Publications, a Colorado publisher of railroad photography books.Contents1 Background 2 Victor Fox2.1 Early life and career background 2.2 Comics publisher3 Fox characters 4 Fox titles 5 Gallery of Fox Feature Syndicate covers 6 References 7 External linksBackground[edit] Victor S. Fox and business associate Bob Farrell launched Fox Feature Syndicate at 480 Lexington Avenue in New York City in the late 1930s. For content, Fox contracted with comics packager Eisner & Iger, one of a handful of companies creating comic books on demand for publishers entering the field
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Hugo Danner
Hugo Danner is a fictional character and the protagonist of Philip Wylie's 1930 novel Gladiator. Born in the late 19th century with superhuman abilities via prenatal chemical experimentation, Danner tries to use his powers for good, making him a precursor of the superhero.[1] However, Danner grows disillusioned with his inability to find a permanent outlet for his great strength, and dies frustrated.[2] Apart from Wylie's novel, the character has also appeared in a feature film and publications by Marvel Comics and DC Comics. Comedic actor Joe E. Brown portrayed him in a 1938 movie adaptation of the book.[3] Decades later the character starred in an adaptation titled "Man-God" in Marvel's black-and-white comics-magazine Marvel Preview #9 (Winter 1976). He next appeared in DC's standard color comic book Young All-Stars in 1988 and 1989, as the estranged father of an illegitimate son named Iron Munro
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