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Sublime Text 2
Sublime Text
Sublime Text
is a proprietary cross-platform source code editor with a Python application programming interface (API)
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Software Developer
A software developer is a person concerned with facets of the software development process, including the research, design, programming, and testing of computer software. Other job titles which are often used with similar meanings are programmer, software analyst, and software engineer. According to developer Eric Sink, the differences between system design, software development, and programming are more apparent. Already in the current market place there can be found a segregation between programmers and developers, being that one who implements is not the same as the one who designs the class structure or hierarchy. Even more so that developers become software architects or systems architects, those who design the multi-leveled architecture or component interactions of a large software system.[1] In a large company, there may be employees whose sole responsibility consists of only one of the phases above
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BBEdit
BBEdit
BBEdit
is a proprietary text editor made by Bare Bones Software, originally developed for Macintosh
Macintosh
System Software 6, and currently supporting macOS.[2]Contents1 History 2 Features 3 Language support 4 Freeware
Freeware
versions4.1 BBEdit
BBEdit
Lite 4.2 TextWrangler5 References 6 External linksHistory[edit] The first version of BBEdit
BBEdit
was created as a "bare bones" text editor to serve as a "proof of concept"; the intention was to demonstrate the programming capabilities of an experimental version of Pascal for the Macintosh. The original prototypes of BBEdit
BBEdit
used the TextEdit control available in versions of the classic Mac OS of the time. The TextEdit control could not load files larger than 32 KB
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GitHub
GitHub
GitHub
(originally known as Logical Awesome LLC)[3] is a web-based hosting service for version control using git. It is mostly used for computer code. It offers all of the distributed version control and source code management (SCM) functionality of Git
Git
as well as adding its own features
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Bitbucket
Bitbucket
Bitbucket
is a web-based version control repository hosting service owned by Atlassian, for source code and development projects that use either Mercurial
Mercurial
(since launch) or Git
Git
(since October 2011[2]) revision control systems. Bitbucket
Bitbucket
offers both commercial plans and free accounts. It offers free accounts with an unlimited number of private repositories (which can have up to five users in the case of free accounts) as of September 2010[update]. Bitbucket
Bitbucket
integrates with other Atlassian
Atlassian
software like Jira, HipChat, Confluence and Bamboo. It is similar to GitHub, which primarily uses Git
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Git (software)
Git
Git
(/ɡɪt/[7]) is a version control system for tracking changes in computer files and coordinating work on those files among multiple people. It is primarily used for source code management in software development,[8] but it can be used to keep track of changes in any set of files
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Mercurial (software)
Mercurial
Mercurial
is a distributed revision-control tool for software developers. It is supported on Microsoft Windows
Microsoft Windows
and Unix-like systems, such as FreeBSD, macOS and Linux. Mercurial's major design goals include high performance and scalability, decentralized, fully distributed collaborative development, robust handling of both plain text and binary files, and advanced branching and merging capabilities, while remaining conceptually simple.[3] It includes an integrated web-interface. Mercurial
Mercurial
has also taken steps to ease the transition for users of other version control systems, particularly Subversion. Mercurial
Mercurial
is primarily a command-line driven program, but graphical user interface extensions are available, e.g. TortoiseHg, and several IDEs offer support for version control with Mercurial
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Lint (software)
A linter or lint refers to tools that analyze source code to flag programming errors, bugs, stylistic errors, and suspicious constructs.[1] The term is originated from a Unix
Unix
utility that examined C language source code.[2]Contents1 History 2 Overview 3 See also 4 References 5 Further readingHistory[edit] Stephen C. Johnson, a computer scientist at Bell Labs, coined the term lint in 1978 while debugging the Yacc grammar he was writing for C while porting the Unix
Unix
operating system to a 32-bit
32-bit
machine.[3][2] He derived it from the name of the undesirable bits of fiber and fluff found in sheep's wool
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Blogging
A blog (a truncation of the expression "weblog")[1] is a discussion or informational website published on the World Wide Web
World Wide Web
consisting of discrete, often informal diary-style text entries ("posts"). Posts are typically displayed in reverse chronological order, so that the most recent post appears first, at the top of the web page. Until 2009, blogs were usually the work of a single individual,[citation needed] occasionally of a small group, and often covered a single subject or topic. In the 2010s, "multi-author blogs" (MABs) have developed, with posts written by large numbers of authors and sometimes professionally edited. MABs from newspapers, other media outlets, universities, think tanks, advocacy groups, and similar institutions account for an increasing quantity of blog traffic. The rise of Twitter
Twitter
and other "microblogging" systems helps integrate MABs and single-author blogs into the news media
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WordPress
WordPress
WordPress
is a free and open-source content management system (CMS) based on PHP
PHP
and MySQL.[4] To function, WordPress
WordPress
has to be installed on a web server, which would either be part of an Internet hosting service or a network host in its own right. An example of the first scenario may be a service like WordPress.com, and the second case could be a computer running the software package WordPress.org.[5] A local computer may be used for single-user testing and learning purposes. Features include a plugin architecture and a template system
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List Of Text Editors
The following is a list of notable text editors.Contents1 Graphical and text user interface 2 Graphical user interface 3 Text user interface3.1 System default 3.2 Others3.2.1 vi clones4 No user interface (editor libraries/toolkits) 5 ASCII
ASCII
and ANSI
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Comparison Of Text Editors
This article provides basic comparisons for common text editors. More feature details for text editors are available from the Category of text editor features and from the individual products' articles
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Atom (text Editor)
Atom is a free and open-source[4][5] text and source code editor for macOS, Linux, and Microsoft Windows[6] with support for plug-ins written in Node.js, and embedded Git
Git
Control, developed by GitHub. Atom is a desktop application built using web technologies.[7] Most of the extending packages have free software licenses and are community-built and maintained.[8] Atom is based on Electron (formerly known as Atom Shell),[9] a framework that enables cross-platform desktop applications using Chromium and Node.js.[10][11] It is written in
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Notepad++
A notebook (notepad, writing pad, drawing pad, legal pad) is a small book or binder of paper pages, often ruled, used for purposes such as recording notes or memoranda, writing, drawing or scrapbooking.Contents1 Early history 2 Legal pad 3 Binding and cover 4 Preprinting 5 Uses 6 Electronic successors 7 See also 8 ReferencesEarly history[edit] During the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries notebooks were often made by hand at home by folding pieces of paper in half into gatherings that were then bound at a later date. The pages were blank and every notekeeper had to make ruled lines across the paper
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Dialog Box
The graphical control element dialog box (also called dialogue box (British English)[1] or just dialog) is a small window that communicates information to the user and prompts them for a response. Dialog boxes are classified as "modal" or "modeless", depending on whether they block interaction with the software that initiated the dialog. The type of dialog box displayed is dependent upon the desired user interaction. The simplest type of dialog box is the alert, which displays a message and may require an acknowledgment that the message has been read, usually by clicking "OK", or a decision as to whether or not an action should proceed, by clicking "OK" or "Cancel". Alerts are also used to display a "termination notice"—sometimes requesting confirmation that the notice has been read—in the event of either an intentional closing or unintentional closing ("crash") of an application or the operating system
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Emacs
Emacs
Emacs
/ˈiːmæks/ is a family of text editors that are characterized by their extensibility.[3] The manual for the most widely used variant,[4] GNU
GNU
Emacs, describes it as "the extensible, customizable, self-documenting, real-time display editor".[5] Development of the first Emacs
Emacs
began in the mid-1970s, and work on its direct descendant, GNU
GNU
Emacs, continues actively as of 2018[update]. Emacs
Emacs
has over 10,000 built-in commands (many of which are macros themselves) and its user interface allows the user to combine these commands into macros to automate work. Implementations of Emacs typically feature a dialect of the Lisp programming language
Lisp programming language
that provides a deep extension capability, allowing users and developers to write new commands and applications for the editor
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