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Stroke Play
Stroke play, also known as medal play, is a scoring system in the sport of golf. It involves counting the total number of strokes taken on each hole during a given round, or series of rounds. The winner is the player who has taken the fewest strokes over the course of the round, or rounds. Although most professional tournaments are played using the stroke play scoring system, there are, or have been, some notable exceptions, for example the WGC-Accenture Match Play Championship
WGC-Accenture Match Play Championship
and Volvo World Match Play Championship, which are both played in a match play format, and The International, a former PGA Tour
PGA Tour
event that used a modified stableford system
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The International (golf)
The International (styled as The INTERNATIONAL) was a professional golf tournament in Colorado
Colorado
on the PGA Tour. It was played for 21 seasons, from 1986 through 2006, at the Castle Pines Golf
Golf
Club at Castle Pines Village
Castle Pines Village
in Castle Rock, south of Denver. It had the distinction of being one of two PGA Tour
PGA Tour
events not conducted at traditional stroke play, the only other exception is the match play event, the WGC-Accenture Match Play Championship. The International was the only tournament to use the Modified Stableford scoring system,[5][2] enacted because of the significant elevation of the venue, which averages 6,300 feet (1,920 m) above sea level. Beginning in 2007, The International was scheduled to change dates to be played during the first full weekend of July (July 5–8, and July 4–7, 2008), midway between the U.S
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WGC-Accenture Match Play Championship
The WGC- Dell
Dell
Technologies Match Play is a match play knockout professional golf event which is one of the four annual World Golf Championships. The tournament is the only of the four WGC events to not be played as a stroke play event. From its 1999 founding until 2014, the tournament was held in late February. Beginning in 2015, the tournament was moved to the first weekend in May. In 2016, the event moved to Austin, Texas
Austin, Texas
and was held during the last week of March. The tournament was originally sponsored by Anderson Consulting/Accenture, and in the years since, it has also been sponsored by Cadillac
Cadillac
and Dell.Contents1 Format 2 Host courses 3 Television 4 Finalists 5 Records 6 References 7 External linksFormat[edit] The field consists of the top 64 players available from the Official World Golf Ranking, seeded according to the rankings
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Sudden Death (sport)
In a sport or game, sudden death (also sudden-death overtime or a sudden-death round) is a form of competition where play ends as soon as one competitor is ahead of the others, with that competitor becoming the winner. Sudden death is typically used as a tiebreaker when a contest is tied at the end of the normal playing time or the completion of the normal playing task. An alternative tiebreaker method is to play a reduced version of the original; for example, in association football 30 minutes of extra time (overtime) after 90 minutes of normal time, or in golf one playoff round (18 holes) after four standard rounds (72 holes). Sudden-death playoffs typically end more quickly than these reduced replays. Reducing the variability of the event's duration assists those scheduling television time and team travel
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Volvo World Match Play Championship
The Volvo World Match Play Championship was the name of an annual match play men's professional golf tournament which was staged from 1964 to 2014. From 2009 to 2012 the event was played at the Finca Cortesín Golf Club in Casares near Málaga, Spain, having previously been played at Wentworth Club near London. In 2013, the event was held at the Thracian Cliffs Golf & Beach Resort in Kavarna, Bulgaria. The event was traditionally played in the autumn, usually in October, but moved to a May date in 2011 and was an official money event on the European Tour from 2004 to 2014. Previous sponsors have included Piccadilly, Suntory, Toyota, Cisco and HSBC. In 2014, the event was played in October at London Golf Club in Kent, England.Contents1 History 2 Winners 3 Multiple winners 4 Qualification criteria 5 Media coverage 6 References 7 External linksHistory[edit] The tournament was founded by sports agent Mark McCormack as a showcase for the players he managed
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List Of Golfers With Most European Tour Wins
This is a list of golfers who have won eight or more events on the European Tour since it was established in 1972. There are some complications in preparing such a list, and different publications have produced different numbers. This list is based on what the European Tour reports the victories being according to their own player guide (through the 2009 season).[1] The number of wins a player can accumulate on the European Tour depends in part on how many years he devotes to the tour. There have always been some leading European players or European Tour members from outside Europe who have gone on to play part or full-time on the U.S.-based PGA Tour
PGA Tour
and cut back their commitments in Europe, and this seems to be an increasing trend. Many of the players on the list have won many events on other tours and unofficial events
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Lists Of Golfers
The following lists of golfers are arranged by gender:List of male golfers List of female golfersGolfers who have played in major team competitions[edit]List of American Ryder Cup
Ryder Cup
golfers List of European Ryder Cup
Ryder Cup
golfers Li
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Penalty (golf)
In the sport of golf, a penalty or penalty stroke is an additional stroke or strokes added to a player's score for an infraction of the rules. In match play, rather than adding strokes, the usual penalty is loss of the hole except for penalties assessed for relief from a hazard or a lost ball. Situations in which a penalty may be assessed include, but are not limited to:Declaring your ball unplayable in its current lie. This technically violates one of the primary rules - "Play the ball as it lies", but the rules provide for relief when a ball is in a position where the player does not wish to attempt to play it. Examples include when the ball lies among tree roots or rocks ("between a rock and a hard place"), underneath shrubbery, etc. and attempting to play it would result in damage to the club or the course
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Golf Etiquette
Golf
Golf
etiquette refers to a set of rules and practices designed to make the game of golf safer and more enjoyable for golfers and to minimize possible damage to golf equipment and courses. Although many of these practices are not part of the formal rules of golf, golfers are customarily expected to observe them.[1] The R&A rule book states that "[t]he overriding principle is that consideration should be shown to others on the course at all times."[2]Contents1 Fairway divots 2 Walking 3 Golf
Golf
carts and equipment 4 Honor 5 Ball identification 6 Line of sight 7 Pitch marks on the green 8 Putting lines 9 Bunkers 10 Slower players 11 Tee 12 References 13 External linksFairway divots[edit] Divots should always be repaired, either by placing sand in the divot or replacing the grass, preferably with a driver
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Drive (golf)
In golf stroke mechanics, a drive, also known as a tee shot, is a long-distance shot played from the tee box, intended to move the ball a great distance down the fairway towards the green. Longest drives[edit] Main article: Long drive An average professional male golfer is capable of hitting a drive using a 1 wood over 300 yards, maximizing power by driving the legs and hips and the body weight into the swing
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Golf Course
A golf course is the grounds where the game of golf is played. It comprises a series of holes, each consisting of a teeing ground, a fairway, the rough and other hazards, and a green with a flagstick ("pin") and hole ("cup"). A standard round of golf consists of 18 holes.[1] Most courses contain 18 holes; some share fairways or greens, and a subset has nine holes, played twice per round. Par-3 courses consist of nine or 18 holes all of which have a par of three strokes. Many older courses are links, often coastal. Courses are private, public, and municipally owned, and typically feature a pro shop
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Teeing Ground
The teeing ground is the area where play begins in a hole of golf. The terms tee, tee box, and "teeing ground" are synonymous. The name derives from the tee used to elevate a golf ball before striking it to commence play. The boundaries of the teeing ground are defined by a pair of tee markers. The front, left and right sides of the tee are denoted by the outer edges of the tee markers, assuming the perspective of a player standing in the teeing ground and facing the hole. The teeing ground is two club-lengths in depth. Most courses have at least three sets of tee markers (some may have six or more), each a different color and denoting different yardages. Some tee marker colors commonly used in the United States are below, along with a general description of who plays from what color. The tee box that a person plays from is not set by rules; in casual play, anyone can use any tee box they wish to
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Links (golf)
A links is the oldest style of golf course, first developed in Scotland. The word "links" comes via the Scots language
Scots language
from the Old English word hlinc : "rising ground, ridge"[1] and refers to an area of coastal sand dunes and sometimes to open parkland. Links land is typically characterised by dunes, an undulating surface, and a sandy soil unsuitable for arable farming but which readily supports various indigenous browntop bents and red fescue grasses, that result in the firm turf associated with links courses and the 'running' game.[clarification needed] It also retains this more general meaning in standard Scottish English
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Professional Golfer
In the sport of golf, the distinction between amateurs and professionals is rigorously maintained. An amateur who breaches the rules of amateur status may lose his or her amateur status. A golfer who has lost his or her amateur status may not play in amateur competitions until amateur status has been reinstated; a professional may not play in amateur tournaments unless the Committee is notified, acknowledges and confirms the participation. It is very difficult for a professional to regain his or her amateur status; simply agreeing not to take payment for a particular tournament is not enough. A player must apply to the governing body of the sport to have amateur status reinstated.Contents1 History 2 Rules2.1 PGA of America3 See also 4 References 5 External linksHistory[edit] Historically, the distinction between amateur and professional golfers had much to do with social class. In 18th and 19th century Britain, golf was played by the rich, for pleasure
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Hazard (golf)
A hazard is an area of a golf course in the sport of golf which provides a difficult obstacle, which may be of two types: (1) water hazards such as lakes and rivers; and (2) man-made hazards such as bunkers. Special
Special
rules apply to playing balls that fall in a hazard. For example, a player may not touch the ground with his club before playing a ball, not even for a practice swing. A ball in any hazard may be played as it lies without penalty. If it cannot be played from the hazard, the ball may be hit from another location, generally with a penalty of one stroke. The Rules of Golf
Golf
govern exactly from where the ball may be played outside a hazard
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Golf Equipment
Golf
Golf
equipment encompasses the various items that are used to play the sport of golf. Types of equipment include the golf ball itself, implements designed for striking the golf ball, devices that aid in the process of playing a stroke, and items that in some way enrich the playing experience.Contents1 Equipment1.1 Ball 1.2 Golf
Golf
clubs 1.3 Ball markers 1.4 Tees 1.5 Golf
Golf
bag 1.6 Golf
Golf
cart 1.7 Towels 1.8 Club head covers 1.9 Ball mark repair tool 1.10 Other aids2 Clothing2.1 Gloves 2.2 Shoes3 See also 4 ReferencesEquipment[edit] Ball[edit] Main article: Golf
Golf
ball Golf
Golf
ballsOriginally, golf balls were made of a hardwood, such as beech. Beginning between the 14th and 16th centuries, more expensive golf balls were made of a leather skin stuffed with down feathers; these were called "featheries"
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