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Striding Folly
Striding Folly
Striding Folly
is a collection of short stories by Dorothy L. Sayers featuring Lord Peter
Lord Peter
Wimsey. First published in 1972, it contains the final three Lord Peter
Lord Peter
stories. The first two, "Striding Folly" and "The Haunted Policeman", were previously published in Detection Medley (1939), an anthology of detective stories. The third one, "Talboys", was unpublished
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New English Library
The New English Library was a United Kingdom
United Kingdom
book publishing company, which became an imprint of Hodder Headline. History[edit] New English Library (NEL) was created in 1961 by the Times Mirror Company of Los Angeles, with the takeover of two small British paperback companies, Ace Books Ltd and Four Square Books Ltd, as a complement to its 1960 acquisition of New American Library
New American Library
in the United States.[1] NEL's top bestseller of the 1960s was The Carpetbaggers by Harold Robbins.[2] The imprint was sold in 1981 to Hodder & Stoughton,[3] and became part of the merged Hodder Headline in 1993. It has published genres such as fantasy, science fiction, mystery and suspense.[4] They have published the works of Stephen King, Harold Robbins, James Herbert
James Herbert
and science fiction authors have included Brian Aldiss, Frank Herbert, Robert A
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Jill Paton Walsh
Jill Paton Walsh, CBE, FRSL (born 29 April 1937) is an English novelist and children's writer. She may be known best for the Peter Wimsey– Harriet Vane mysteries that have completed or continued the work of Dorothy Sayers.Contents1 Personal life 2 Honours 3 On writing for children 4 Works4.1 Imogen Quy 4.2 Lord Peter Wimsey 4.3 Children's books5 Bibliography 6 See also 7 References 8 External linksPersonal life[edit] Born Gillian Bliss, she was educated at St. Michael's Convent,[1] North Finchley, London, and she read English Literature at St Anne's College, Oxford. She lives in Cambridge. In 1961, she married Antony Paton Walsh (died 30 December 2003); the couple had one son and two daughters
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Short Story
A short story is a piece of prose fiction that can be read in one sitting. Emerging from earlier oral storytelling traditions in the 17th century, the short story has grown to encompass a body of work so diverse as to defy easy characterization. At its most prototypical the short story features a small cast of named characters, and focuses on a self-contained incident with the intent of evoking a "single effect" or mood.[1] In doing so, short stories make use of plot, resonance, and other dynamic components to a far greater degree than is typical of an anecdote, yet to a far lesser degree than a novel. While the short story is largely distinct from the novel, authors of both generally draw from a common pool of literary techniques. Short stories have no set length
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Victor Gollancz
Sir Victor Gollancz (/ɡəˈlæns, -ˈlænts/; 9 April 1893 – 8 February 1967) was a British publisher and humanitarian. Gollancz was often noted as a supporter of left-wing causes. His loyalties shifted between Liberalism
Liberalism
and Communism, but he defined himself as a Christian Socialist and Internationalist. Although he gained high credibility by forecasting the Nazi
Nazi
extermination of Jews, he campaigned for friendship with both Germany
Germany
and Soviet Russia. He used his publishing house chiefly to promote pacifist and socialist non-fiction, and also launched the Left Book Club. In the postwar era, he focused his attention on Germany
Germany
and became noted for his promotion of friendship and reconciliation based on his internationalism and his ethic of brotherly love
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International Standard Book Number
"ISBN" redirects here. For other uses, see ISBN (other).International Standard Book
Book
NumberA 13-digit ISBN, 978-3-16-148410-0, as represented by an EAN-13 bar codeAcronym ISBNIntroduced 1970; 48 years ago (1970)Managing organisation International ISBN AgencyNo. of digits 13 (formerly 10)Check digit Weighted sumExample 978-3-16-148410-0Website www.isbn-international.orgThe International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a unique[a][b] numeric commercial book identifier. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each edition and variation (except reprintings) of a book. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book would each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is 13 digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007, and 10 digits long if assigned before 2007
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992
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Distributed Proofreaders Canada
Distributed Proofreaders
Distributed Proofreaders
Canada (DP Canada) is a volunteer organization that converts books into digital format and releases them as public domain books in formats readable by electronic devices. It was launched in December 2007 and as of 2016[update] has published about 2,500 books. Books that are released are stored on a book archive called Faded Page. While its focus is on Canadian publications and preserving Canadiana, it also includes books from other countries as well
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The Spectator
The Spectator
The Spectator
is a weekly British magazine on politics, culture, and current affairs.[1] It was first published on 6 July 1828.[2] It is currently owned by David and Frederick Barclay
David and Frederick Barclay
who also own The Daily Telegraph newspaper, via Press Holdings. Its principal subject areas are politics and culture. Its editorial outlook is generally supportive of the Conservative Party, although regular contributors include some outside that fold, such as Frank Field, Rod Liddle and Martin Bright. The magazine also contains arts pages on books, music, opera, and film and TV reviews. In late 2008, Spectator Australia was launched
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Lord Peter Views The Body
Lord Peter
Lord Peter
Views the Body, first published in 1928, was the first collection of short stories about Lord Peter Wimsey
Lord Peter Wimsey
by Dorothy L. Sayers
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Hangman's Holiday
Hangman's Holiday is a collection of short stories, mostly murder mysteries, by Dorothy L. Sayers. This collection, the ninth in the Lord Peter Wimsey
Lord Peter Wimsey
series, was first published by Gollancz in 1933 and has been frequently reprinted (1995 paperback: ISBN 978-0-06-104362-8). Contents[edit] Lord Peter Wimsey
Lord Peter Wimsey
stories:"The Image in the Mirror" "The Incredible Elopement of Lord Peter
Lord Peter
Wimsey" "The Queen's Square" "The Necklace of Pearls" Montague Egg stories:"The Poisoned Dow '08" "Sleuths on the Scent" "Murder in the Morning" "One Too Many" "Murder at Pentecost" "Maher-Shalal-Hashbaz"Other stories:"The Man Who Knew How" "The Fountain Plays"v t e Lord Peter Wimsey
Lord Peter Wimsey
stories by Dorothy L
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In The Teeth Of The Evidence
In the Teeth of the Evidence is a collection of short stories by Dorothy L. Sayers
Dorothy L. Sayers
first published by Victor Gollancz in 1939. The book's title is taken from the first story in the collection. Contents[edit] Lord Peter Wimsey
Lord Peter Wimsey
stories:"In the Teeth of the Evidence" "Absolutely Elsewhere" Montague Egg stories:"A Shot at Goal" "Dirt Cheap" "Bitter Almonds" "False Weight" "The Professor's Manuscript"Other stories:"The Milk-Bottles" "Dilemma" "An Arrow O'er the House" "Scrawns" "Nebuchadnezzar" "The Inspiration of Mr. Budd" "Blood Sacrifice" "Suspicion" "The Leopard Lady" "The Cyprian Cat"v t e Lord Peter Wimsey
Lord Peter Wimsey
stories by Dorothy L
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The Wimsey Papers
The Wimsey Papers are a series of articles by Dorothy L. Sayers published between November 1939 and January 1940 in The Spectator. They had the form of letters exchanged by members of the Wimsey Family and other characters familiar to readers from the Lord Peter
Lord Peter
Wimsey detective novels, but were in fact intended to convey Sayers's opinions and commentaries on various aspects of public life in the early months of the Second World War, such as black-out, evacuation, rationing and the need of the public to take personal responsibility rather than wait for the government to guide them
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The Attenbury Emeralds
The Attenbury Emeralds
The Attenbury Emeralds
is the third Lord Peter Wimsey
Lord Peter Wimsey
detective novel to be written by Jill Paton Walsh. It was published by Hodder & Stoughton in September 2010.Contents1 1921 2 1951 3 Succession to the Dukedom 4 References 5 External links1921[edit] The Attenbury Emeralds
The Attenbury Emeralds
recounts how Lord Peter
Lord Peter
begins his hobby of amateur sleuthing in 1921 by becoming involved in the recovery of the Attenbury Emeralds. Lord Peter's "first case" is a mystery mentioned by Lord Peter's creator Dorothy L. Sayers
Dorothy L. Sayers
in a number of novels, but until now never fully told.[1] The novel is set after World War II, but in its first chapters this seems like a mere frame story, with Wimsey recounting to his wife Harriet the reminiscences of the start of his detecting career in 1921
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Thrones, Dominations
Thrones, Dominations
Thrones, Dominations
is a Lord Peter Wimsey
Lord Peter Wimsey
murder mystery novel that Dorothy L. Sayers
Dorothy L. Sayers
began writing but abandoned, and which remained at her death as fragments and notes. It was completed by Jill Paton Walsh and published in 1998. The title is a quotation from John Milton's Paradise Lost
Paradise Lost
and refers to two categories of angel in the Christian angelic hierarchy.Contents1 Background 2 Plot summary 3 Characters 4 Reception 5 References 6 External linksBackground[edit] Sayers had charted the developing relationship between Lord Peter Wimsey and Harriet Vane over four published novels, culminating in Busman's Honeymoon, the action of which takes place immediately following the couple's marriage
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A Presumption Of Death
A Presumption of Death
A Presumption of Death
is a mystery novel by Jill Paton Walsh, based loosely on The Wimsey Papers by Dorothy L. Sayers. The novel is Walsh's first original Lord Peter Wimsey
Lord Peter Wimsey
novel, following Thrones, Dominations, which Sayers left as an unfinished manuscript, and was completed by Walsh. A Presumption of Death
A Presumption of Death
is written by Walsh, except for excerpts from The Wimsey Papers.Contents1 Plot1.1 Bunter returns 1.2 Peter returns 1.3 Return from Northumberland 1.4 The radio signals 1.5 Textual difficulties2 Continuity 3 External linksPlot[edit] Harriet, Lady Peter Wimsey, has evacuated her family to the Wimseys' country house, Talboys in Hertfordshire, taking her two children, along with the three children of her sister-in-law, Lady Mary, and Peter's venerable old housekeeper, Mrs Trapp
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