HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Streetcar
A tram (also tramcar; and in North America streetcar, trolley or trolley car) is a rail vehicle which runs on tracks along public urban streets, and also sometimes on a segregated right of way.[1][2] The lines or networks operated by tramcars are called tramways. Tramways powered by electricity, the most common type, were once called electric street railways (mainly in the United States) due to their being widely used in urban areas before the universal adoption of electrification. In the United States, the term tram has sometimes been used for rubber-tyred trackless trains, which are not related to the other vehicles covered in this article. Tram
Tram
vehicles are usually lighter and shorter than conventional trains and rapid transit trains. Today, most trams use electrical power, usually fed by an overhead pantograph; in some cases by a sliding shoe on a third rail, trolley pole or bow collector
[...More...]

"Streetcar" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Tram (other)
A tram is a rail-based public transport system, or the type of vehicle used on such a system, which runs primarily on streets (also known as a tramcar, trolley or streetcar); also used in mining. Tram
Tram
(or trams) may also mean:Contents1 Transport 2 Geography 3 Textiles 4 Film 5 Music 6 Acronym 7 See also 8 ReferencesTransport[edit] Light rail
[...More...]

"Tram (other)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Rapid Transit
Rapid transit
Rapid transit
or mass rapid transit, also known as heavy rail, metro, subway, tube, or underground, is a type of high-capacity public transport generally found in urban areas.[1][2][3] Unlike buses or trams, rapid transit systems are electric railways that operate on an exclusive right-of-way, which cannot be accessed by pedestrians or other vehicles of any sort,[4] and which is often grade separated in tunnels or on elevated railways. Modern services on rapid transit systems are provided on designated lines between stations typically using electric multiple units on rail tracks, although some systems use guided rubber tires, magnetic levitation, or monorail.[citation needed] The stations typically have high platforms, without steps inside the trains, requiring custom-made trains in order to minimize gaps between train and platform. They are typically integrated with other public transport and often operated by the same public transport authorities
[...More...]

"Rapid Transit" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Wheelset (rail Transport)
A wheelset is the wheel - axle assembly of a railroad car. The frame assembly beneath each end of a car, railcar or locomotive that holds the wheelsets is called the bogie (or truck in North America)
[...More...]

"Wheelset (rail Transport)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Bogie
A bogie (/ˈboʊɡi/ BOH-ghee) (in some senses called a truck in North American English) is a chassis or framework carrying wheelsets, attached to a vehicle, thus serving as a modular subassembly of wheels and axles. Bogies take various forms in various modes of transport
[...More...]

"Bogie" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Dual Coupling
Different types of railroad rolling stock have different couplers depending on the purpose and type of equipment being used and its intended destination. European rolling stock tend to use buffers and chain couplers while American rolling stock uses a Janney coupler
Janney coupler
or "knuckle coupler". These are incompatible with each other, but where some railroads have obtained older, less expensive used rolling stock from different countries or regions, instead of having to standardize on one form of coupler, it may be useful to be able to use either type of coupler on a piece of rolling stock without having to remove anything. It is possible to mount both buffers and chain and knuckle couplers on the same car, provided that one can swing out of the way. Alternatively, either a lug to hold the chain is cast in the body of the coupler or a chain is mounted on top of the coupler
[...More...]

"Dual Coupling" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Rail Subsidies
Many countries offer subsidies to their railways because of the social and economic benefits that it brings. Those countries usually also fund or subsidize road construction, and therefore effectively subsidize road transport as well. Rail subsidies
Rail subsidies
vary in both size and how they are distributed, with some countries funding the infrastructure and others funding trains and their operators, while others have a mixture of both
[...More...]

"Rail Subsidies" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Rail Tracks
North America · South America · Europe · Australiav t ePart of a series onRail transportOperations Track Maintenance High-speed railways Track gauge Stations Trains Locomotives Rolling
Rolling
stock Companies History Attractions Terminology (AU, NA, NZ, UK) By country Accidents Railway couplings Couplers by country Coupler conversion Track gauge Variable gauge Gauge conversion Dual gauge Wheelset Bogie
Bogie
(truck) Dual coupling Rail subsidiesModellingv t eThe track on a railway or railroad, also known as the permanent way, is the structure consisting of the rails, fasteners, railroad ties (sleepers, British English) and ballast (or slab track), plus the underlying subgrade. It enables trains to move by providing a dependable surface for their wheels to roll upon
[...More...]

"Rail Tracks" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Right-of-way (transportation)
A right-of-way (ROW) is a right to make a way over a piece of land, usually to and from another piece of land. A right of way is a type of easement granted or reserved over the land for transportation purposes, this can be for a highway, public footpath, rail transport, canal, as well as electrical transmission lines, oil and gas pipelines.[1] A right-of-way can be used to build a bike trail. A right-of-way is reserved for the purposes of maintenance or expansion of existing services with the right-of-way. In the case of an easement, it may revert to its original owners if the facility is abandoned.Contents1 Rail right-of-way1.1 Rail rights-of-way uses other than rail transport2 See also 3 ReferencesRail right-of-way[edit] In the United States, railroad rights-of-way (ROW or R/O/W) are generally considered private property by the respective railroad owners and by applicable state laws. Most U.S
[...More...]

"Right-of-way (transportation)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Electrification
Electrification
Electrification
is the process of powering by electricity and, in many contexts, the introduction of such power by changing over from an earlier power source. The broad meaning of the term, such as in the history of technology, economic history, and economic development, usually applies to a region or national economy. Broadly speaking, electrification was the build-out of the electricity generation and electric power distribution systems that occurred in Britain, the United States, and other now-developed countries from the mid-1880s until around 1950 and is still in progress in rural areas in some developing countries. This included the transition in manufacturing from line shaft and belt drive using steam engines and water power to electric motors.[1][2] The electrification of particular sectors of the economy is called by terms such as factory electrification, household electrification, rural electrification or railway electrification
[...More...]

"Electrification" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Trackless Train
A trackless train — or tram (U.S. English), road train, land train, parking lot tram, Dotto train or Choo-Choo train — is a road-going articulated vehicle used for the transport of passengers, comprising a driving vehicle pulling one or more carriages connected by drawbar couplings, in the manner of a road-going railway train. Similar vehicles may be used for transport of freight or baggage for short distances, such as at a factory or airport.Contents1 Terminology 2 Technology 3 Public uses 4 Private uses 5 Appearance 6 Airport
Airport
baggage trains 7 See also 8 References 9 External linksTerminology[edit] Trackless train
Trackless train
or land train are descriptive terms for the rubber tired road-going vehicles to distinguish them from rail mounted trains
[...More...]

"Trackless Train" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Third Rail
A third rail is a method of providing electric power to a railway locomotive or train, through a semi-continuous rigid conductor placed alongside or between the rails of a railway track. It is used typically in a mass transit or rapid transit system, which has alignments in its own corridors, fully or almost fully segregated from the outside environment
[...More...]

"Third Rail" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Variable Gauge
North America · South America · Europe · Australiav t ePart of a series onRail transportOperations Track Maintenance High-speed railways Track gauge Stations Trains Locomotives Rolling stock Companies History Attractions Terminology (AU, NA, NZ, UK) By country Accidents Railway couplings Couplers by country Coupler conversion Track gauge Variable gauge Gauge conversion Dual gauge Wheelset Bogie
Bogie
(truck) Dual coupling Rail subsidiesModellingv t eA variable gauge system allows railway vehicles in a train to travel across a break of gauge caused by two railway networks with differing track gauges. For through-operation, a train must be equipped with special trucks holding variable gauge wheelsets containing a variable gauge axle (VGA)
[...More...]

"Variable Gauge" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Bow Collector
A bow collector is one of the three main devices used on tramcars to transfer electric current from the wires above to the tram below. While once very common in continental Europe, it was replaced by the pantograph or the trolley pole, itself often later replaced by the pantograph.Contents1 Origins 2 Construction 3 Operation 4 Advantages and modern usage4.1 Rigid collectors5 See also 6 ReferencesOrigins[edit] When the bow collector was first conceived by German inventor Ernst Werner von Siemens in the late 1880s, American inventor Frank J. Sprague of Virginia
Virginia
had just patented his trolley pole system of current collection from an overhead wire. To avoid contravening this patent, the Siemens company was forced to design its own, unique form of current collection, namely the bow collector. The bow collector was first used by the Siemens electric company in its early electric tramcars in either the late 1880s or early 1890s
[...More...]

"Bow Collector" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Tram-train
A tram-train is a light-rail public transport system where trams run through from an urban tramway network to main-line railway lines which are shared with conventional trains. This combines the tram's flexibility and accessibility with a train's greater speed, and bridges the distance between main railway stations and a city centre. There is also a train-tram, which is a train modified to also run on tramlines
[...More...]

"Tram-train" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Strasbourg Tramway
The Strasbourg
Strasbourg
tramway (French: Tramway de Strasbourg, German: Straßenbahn Straßburg), run by the CTS, is a network of six tramlines, A, B, C, D, E and F that operate in the city of Strasbourg in Alsace, France
France
and Kehl
Kehl
in Baden-Württemberg, Germany.[1] The first tramline in Strasbourg, which was originally horse-drawn, opened in 1878. After 1894, when an electric powered tram system was introduced, a widespread network of tramways was built, including several longer distance lines on both sides of the Rhine. The decline of the tramways system began in the 1930s, and ended with the retirement of the service in 1960 in parallel to the closure of many such systems in France
France
and the rest of the world
[...More...]

"Strasbourg Tramway" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.