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Strathbungo
Strathbungo
Strathbungo
grew up as a small village built along the Pollokshaws Road, one of the main arteries leading southwards from the centre of Glasgow, adjoined by the Camphill Estate, now part of Queens Park. Strathbungo
Strathbungo
lay just inside Govan
Govan
parish, on its boundary with Cathcart
Cathcart
parish, and at one time a line just north of Allison Street and Nithsdale Street formed the boundary or 'march' between the counties of Lanark and Renfrew. The feudal superiors, the Maxwells of Pollok, preferred the name Marchtown
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List Of Places In Scotland
This List of places in Scotland
Scotland
is a complete collection of lists of places in Scotland.List of burghs in Scotland List of census localities in Scotland List of islands of ScotlandList of Shetland islands List of Orkney islands List of Inner Hebrides List of Outer Hebrides List of outlying islands of Scotland List of freshwater islands in ScotlandList of rivers of Scotland List of lochs in Scotland Waterfalls of Scotland List of Munros Extreme points of ScotlandLists of places within Scottish local authorities[edit]List of places in Aberdeen Li
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Maxwell Macdonald Baronets
The Maxwell, later Stirling-Maxwell, later Maxwell Macdonald Baronetcy, of Pollock in the County of Renfrew, is a title in the Baronetage of Nova Scotia. It was created on 12 April 1682 for John Maxwell, with remainder to the heirs of the body. In 1707 he was given a new patent extending the remainder to heirs of entail in his lands and estates. Maxwell was Lord Justice Clerk
Lord Justice Clerk
of Scotland from 1699 to 1702, and Rector of the University of Glasgow
Rector of the University of Glasgow
from 1691 to 1718.[1] He was the member of an ancient Scottish family that also included the Earls of Nithsdale. One early member of the family, Sir John Maxwell, of Pollok, fought at the Battle of Otterburn
Battle of Otterburn
in 1388, where he notably captured Sir Ralph Percy, son of the Earl of Northumberland and brother of the commander of the English army, Sir Henry Percy, known as the "Hotspur"
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Glasgow Southside (Scottish Parliament Constituency)
Glasgow Southside is a constituency of the Scottish Parliament (Holyrood). It elects one Member of the Scottish Parliament
Scottish Parliament
(MSP) by the plurality (first past the post) method of election. It is one of nine constituencies in the Glasgow electoral region, which elects seven additional members, in addition to the nine constituency MSPs, to produce a form of proportional representation for the region as a whole
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List Of United Kingdom Locations
A gazetteer of place names in the United Kingdom
United Kingdom
showing each place's county, unitary authority or council area and its geographical coordinates.A B C D E F G H I, J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X–ZSee also External linksThe United KingdomLocation names beginning with ALocation names beginning with Aa–Ak Location names beginning with Al Location names beginning with Am–Ar Location names beginning with As–AzLocation names beginning with BLocation names beginning with Bab–Bal Location names beginning with Bam
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Ordnance Survey National Grid
The Ordnance Survey
Ordnance Survey
National Grid reference
Grid reference
system is a system of geographic grid references used in Great Britain, distinct from latitude and longitude. It is often called British National Grid (BNG).[1][2] The Ordnance Survey
Ordnance Survey
(OS) devised the national grid reference system, and it is heavily used in their survey data, and in maps based on those surveys, whether published by the Ordnance Survey
Ordnance Survey
or by commercial map producers
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Geographic Coordinate System
A geographic coordinate system is a coordinate system used in geography that enables every location on Earth to be specified by a set of numbers, letters or symbols.[n 1] The coordinates are often chosen such that one of the numbers represents a vertical position, and two or three of the numbers represent a horizontal position
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River Clyde
The River
River
Clyde (Scottish Gaelic: Abhainn Chluaidh, pronounced [avɪɲ ˈxlˠ̪uəj], Scots: Watter o Clyde) is a river, that flows into the Firth of Clyde
Firth of Clyde
in Scotland. It is the eighth-longest river in the United Kingdom, and the second-longest in Scotland. Traveling through the major city of Glasgow, it was an important river for shipbuilding and trade in the British Empire
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Lanarkshire
Lanarkshire, also called the County of Lanark
Lanark
(Scottish Gaelic: Siorrachd Lannraig, Scots: Lanrikshire) is a historic county in the central Lowlands of Scotland. Historically, Lanarkshire
Lanarkshire
was the most populo
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Renfrewshire
Renfrewshire
Renfrewshire
(/ˈrɛnfruːʃɪər, -ʃər/; Scottish Gaelic: Siorrachd Rinn Friù) is one of 32 council areas of Scotland. Located in the west central Lowlands, it is one of three council areas contained within the boundaries of the historic county of Renfrewshire, the others being East Renfrewshire
East Renfrewshire
to the east and Inverclyde
Inverclyde
to the west. It also shares borders with Glasgow, North Ayrshire
North Ayrshire
and West Dunbartonshire, and lies on The southern bank of The River Clyde
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Tenement
A tenement is a multi-occupancy building of any sort. However, in the United States it has come to mean a run-down apartment building, a slum.[1] In parts of England, especially Devon
Devon
and Cornwall, it refers to an outshot, or additional projecting part at the back of a terraced house, normally with its own roof.[2]Contents1 History 2 Specific places2.1 New York City 2.2 Edinburgh
Edinburgh
and Glasgow 2.3 Berlin 2.4 Buenos Aires 2.5 Mumbai 2.6 Poland3 See also 4 References4.1 Notes 4.2 Bibliography5 Further reading5.1 Historiography6 External linksHistory[edit]Rear view of an early 19th-century Scottish tenement, EdinburghThe term tenement originally referred to tenancy and therefore to any rented accommodation
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Burgh
A burgh /ˈbʌrə/ was an autonomous municipal corporation in Scotland and Northern England, usually a town, or toun in Scots. This type of administrative division existed from the 12th century, when King David I created the first royal burghs. Burgh
Burgh
status was broadly analogous to borough status, found in the rest of the United Kingdom. Following local government reorganization in 1975 the title of "royal burgh" remains in use in many towns, but now has little more than ceremonial value.Contents1 History1.1 Types 1.2 Modern history2 Features2.1 Provost 2.2 Bailies 2.3 Burgesses 2.4 Dean of Guild 2.5 Trading privileges3 Etymology 4 Linguistics4.1 England 4.2 Scotland 4.3 Other5 See also 6 Notes 7 ReferencesHistory[edit] The first burgh was Berwick. By 1130, David I (r
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Scottish Gaelic
Scottish Gaelic
Scottish Gaelic
or Scots Gaelic, sometimes also referred to simply as Gaelic (Gàidhlig [ˈkaːlikʲ] ( listen)) or the Gaelic, is a Celtic language native to the Gaels
Gaels
of Scotland. A member of the Goidelic branch of the Celtic languages, Scottish Gaelic, like Modern Irish and Manx, developed out of Middle Irish. Most of modern Scotland was once Gaelic-speaking, as evidenced especially by Gaelic-language placenames.[3] In the 2011 census of Scotland, 57,375 people (1.1% of the Scottish population aged over three years old) reported as able to speak Gaelic, 1,275 fewer than in 2001
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St Mungo
Kentigern (Welsh: Cyndeyrn Garthwys; Latin: Kentigernus), known as Mungo, was an apostle of the Scottish Kingdom of Strathclyde
Kingdom of Strathclyde
in the late 6th century, and the founder and patron saint of the city of Glasgow.Contents1 Name 2 Biographers 3 Hagiographic life 4 Miracles 5 Analysis 6 Veneration6.1 Other churches and schools7 Fiction 8 See also 9 Sources and references 10 Notes 11 External linksName[edit] In Wales
Wales
and England, this saint is known by his birth and baptismal name Kentigern (Welsh: Cyndeyrn). This name probably comes from the British *Cuno-tigernos, which is composed of the elements *cun, a hound, and *tigerno, a lord, prince, or king
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Croft, Scotland
A croft is a fenced or enclosed area of land, usually small and arable, usually, but not always, with a crofter's dwelling thereon. A crofter is one who has tenure and use of the land, typically as a tenant farmer, especially in rural areas.Contents1 Etymology 2 Legislation 3 See also 4 References 5 External linksEtymology[edit] The word croft is West Germanic in etymology[1] and is now most familiar in Scotland, most crofts being in the Highlands and Islands area. Elsewhere the expression is generally archaic
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Miners
A miner is a person who extracts ore, coal, or other mineral from the earth through mining. There are two senses in which the term is used. In its narrowest sense, a miner is someone who works at the rock face; cutting, blasting, or otherwise working and removing the rock.[1][2] In a broader sense, a "miner" is anyone working within a mine, not just a worker at the rock face.[1] Mining
Mining
is one of the most dangerous trades in the world.[3] in some countries, miners lack social guarantees and in case of injury may be left to cope without assistance. In regions with a long mining tradition, many communities have developed cultural traditions and aspects specific to the various regions, in the forms of particular equipment, symbolism, music, and the like.Contents1 Roles 2 Modern Miners 3 Cryptocurrency
Cryptocurrency
miners 4 Gallery 5 See also 6 ReferencesRoles[edit] Different functions of the individual miner
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