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Strait Of Hormuz
The Strait
Strait
of Hormuz (/hɔːrˈmuːz/ Persian: تنگه هرمز‎ Tangeye Hormoz  listen (help·info)) is a strait between the Persian Gulf
Persian Gulf
and the Gulf of Oman. It provides the only sea passage from the Persian Gulf
Persian Gulf
to the open ocean and is one of the world's most strategically important choke points. On the north coast lies Iran, and on the south coast the United Arab Emirates
United Arab Emirates
and Musandam, an exclave of Oman
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Amphibious Transport Dock
An amphibious transport dock, also called a landing platform/dock (LPD), is an amphibious warfare ship, a warship that embarks, transports, and lands elements of a landing force for expeditionary warfare missions.[1] Several navies currently operate this kind of ship. The ships are generally designed to transport troops into a war zone by sea, primarily using landing craft, although invariably they also have the capability to operate transport helicopters. Amphibious transport docks perform the mission of amphibious transports, amphibious cargo ships, and the older LSDs by incorporating both a flight deck and a well deck that can be ballasted and deballasted to support landing craft or amphibious vehicles
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Guided Missile
In modern language, a missile is a self-propelled system, as opposed to an unguided self-propelled munition, referred to as a rocket (although these too can also be guided). Missiles have four system components: targeting or missile guidance, flight system, engine, and warhead. Missiles come in types adapted for different purposes: surface-to-surface and air-to-surface missiles (ballistic, cruise, anti-ship, anti-tank, etc.), surface-to-air missiles (and anti-ballistic), air-to-air missiles, and anti-satellite weapons
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Energy Information Administration
The U.S. Energy
Energy
Information Administration (EIA) is a principal agency of the U.S. Federal Statistical System responsible for collecting, analyzing, and disseminating energy information to promote sound policymaking, efficient markets, and public understanding of energy and its interaction with the economy and the environment. EIA programs cover data on coal, petroleum, natural gas, electric, renewable and nuclear energy. EIA is part of the U.S
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USS Samuel B. Roberts (FFG-58)
USS Samuel B. Roberts (FFG-58) is one of the final ships in the United States Navy's Oliver Hazard Perry-class of guided missile frigates (FFG). Commissioned in 1986, the ship was severely damaged by an Iranian mine in 1988, leading U.S. forces to respond with Operation Praying Mantis. Repaired and returned to duty, the ship served until decommissioned in 2015.Contents1 Commissioning and namesake 2 1988 deployment and mine strike 3 Repairs 4 After repair 5 Gallery 6 References 7 Further reading 8 External linksCommissioning and namesake[edit] The frigate was named for Samuel B. Roberts, a Navy coxswain who was killed while evacuating the U.S. Marines
U.S. Marines
during the battle of Guadalcanal in 1942. Roberts was posthumously awarded the Navy Cross. Samuel B. Roberts was the third U.S. ship to bear the coxswain's name, after Samuel B. Roberts (DE-413), a John C
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Frigate
A frigate /ˈfrɪɡɪt/ is any of several types of warship, the term having been used for ships of various sizes and roles over the last few centuries. In the 17th century, this term was used for any warship built for speed and maneuverability, the description often used being "frigate-built". These could be warships carrying their principal batteries of carriage-mounted guns on a single deck or on two decks (with further smaller carriage-mounted guns usually carried on the forecastle and quarterdeck of the vessel). The term was generally used for ships too small to stand in the line of battle, although early line-of-battle ships were frequently referred to as frigates when they were built for speed. In the 18th century, the term referred to ships that were usually as long as a ship of the line and were square-rigged on all three masts (full-rigged), but were faster and with lighter armament, used for patrolling and escort
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Gunboat
A gunboat is a naval watercraft designed for the express purpose of carrying one or more guns to bombard coastal targets, as opposed to those military craft designed for naval warfare, or for ferrying troops or supplies.Contents1 History1.1 Pre-steam era 1.2 Steam era 1.3 World War II1.3.1 United Kingdom 1.3.2 United States 1.3.3 Soviet Union1.4 Vietnam War2 See also 3 Notes 4 References 5 External linksHistory[edit] Pre-steam era[edit] In the age of sail, a gunboat was usually a small undecked vessel carrying a single smoothbore cannon in the bow, or just two or three such cannons
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Iran Air
Iran
Iran
Air, branded as The Airline of the Islamic Republic of Iran (Persian: هواپیمايی جمهوری اسلامی ایران‎ Havâpeymâyiye Jomhuriye Eslâmiye Irân), is the flag carrier of Iran
Iran
headquartered on the grounds of Mehrabad Airport
Mehrabad Airport
in Tehran. As of 2018, it operates scheduled services to 71 destinations in Asia
Asia
and Europe. Iran
Iran
Air’s main bases are Imam Khomeini International Airport and Mehrabad Airport, both situated in Tehran, capital of Iran
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Airbus A300
The Airbus
Airbus
A300 is a wide-body twin-engine jet airliner that was developed and manufactured by Airbus. Formally announced in 1969 and first flying in October 1972, it holds the distinction of being the world's first twin-engined widebody airliner; it was also the first product of Airbus
Airbus
Industrie, a consortium of European aerospace manufacturers, now a subsidiary of Airbus. The A300 can typically seat 266 passengers in a two-class layout, with a maximum range of 4,070 nautical miles (7,540 km) when fully loaded, depending on model. Development of the A300 began during the 1960s as a European collaborative project between various aircraft manufacturers in the United Kingdom, France, and West Germany. In September 1967, the participating nations signed a Memorandum of Understanding to manufacture the aircraft. The British withdrew from the project on 10 April 1969
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Cruiser
A cruiser is a type of warship. The term has been in use for several hundred years, and has had different meanings throughout this period. During the Age of Sail, the term cruising referred to certain kinds of missions – independent scouting, commerce protection, or raiding – fulfilled by a frigate or sloop, which were the cruising warships of a fleet. Modern cruisers are generally the largest ships in a fleet after aircraft carriers, and can usually perform several roles. In the middle of the 19th century, cruiser came to be a classification for the ships intended for cruising distant waters, commerce raiding, and scouting for the battle fleet
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Innocent Passage
Innocent passage is a concept in the law of the sea that allows for a vessel to pass through the territorial waters of another state, subject to certain restrictions. The United Nations Convention on the Law
Law
of the Sea defines innocent passage as:[1]Passage is innocent so long as it is not prejudicial to the peace, good order or security of the coastal State. Such passage shall take place in conformity with this Convention and with other rules of international law. Innocent passage concedes the coastal country's territorial sea claim, unlike freedom of navigation, which directly contests it.[2][3] The law was codified in 1958 and affirmed in 1982.[4][5] See also[edit]1988 Black Sea bumping incident Corfu Channel Incident Transit passageReferences[edit]^ UN CLS, Part II ^ Bosco, Joseph A. "Are Freedom of Navigation Operations and Innocent Passage Really the Same?". The Diplomat. Retrieved 2016-03-13.  ^ "U.S
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USS Newport News (SSN-750)
USS Newport News (SSN-750), a Los Angeles-class submarine, was the third ship of the United States Navy to be named for Newport News, Virginia.Contents1 Construction 2 Initial operations 3 Collision with Japanese ship 4 Gallery 5 References 6 External linksConstruction[edit] The contract to build her was awarded to Newport News Shipbuilding and Dry Dock Company in Newport News, Virginia on 19 April 1982 and her keel was laid down on 3 March 1984. She was launched on 15 March 1986 sponsored by Mrs. Rosemary D. Trible, and commissioned on 3 June 1989 with Commander Mark B. Keef in command. Mayor Jessie M. Rattley presented the ship with a commemorative plaque containing the poem "Newport News," written by Newport News native Ronald W. Bell, whose poem "Admiral Rickover" also appears upon a plaque aboard the Los Angeles class submarine Hyman G. Rickover.Ref: Naval Submarine Base, Groton, Ct
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Mohammad Ali Jafari
Major General
Major General
Mohammad Ali Jafari
Mohammad Ali Jafari
(Persian: محمدعلی جعفری‎, born 1 September 1957 in Yazd, also known as Aziz Jafari[2] and Ali Jafari[3]) is the Iranian commander of the Iranian Revolutionary Guard Corps (IRGC). He was appointed by the Supreme Leader of Iran, Ali Khamenei, on September 1, 2007, to succeed Major General Yahya Rahim Safavi. According to a September 2, 2007, report by Radio Free Europe, Radio Farda has described Jafari has been close to the conservative subfaction, which includes Mohsen Rezaee, the secretary of the Expediency Discernment Council
Expediency Discernment Council
and former commander of the IRGC and Mohammad Bagher Ghalibaf, a former IRGC member and the mayor of Tehran
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Israel
Coordinates: 31°N 35°E / 31°N 35°E / 31; 35State of Israelמְדִינַת יִשְׂרָאֵל (Hebrew) دَوْلَة إِسْرَائِيل (Arabic)FlagEmblemAnthem: "Hatikvah" (Hebrew for "The Hope")(pre-) 1967 border (Green Line)Capital and largest city Jerusalem
Jerusalem
(limited recognition)[fn 1] 31°47′N 35°13′E / 31.783°N 35.217°E / 31.783; 35.217Official languagesHebrew ArabicEthnic groups (2017)74.7% Jewish
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Iranian Students' News Agency
The Iranian Students News Agency
Iranian Students News Agency
(ISNA) is a news organization run by Iranian university students.Contents1 History and profile 2 See also 3 Further reading 4 References 5 External linksHistory and profile[edit] Iranian Students News Agency
Iranian Students News Agency
was established in December 1999 in order to report on news from Iranian universities.[1] It now covers a variety of national and international topics.[2] Editors and correspondents are themselves students in a variety of subjects, many of them are volunteers (nearly 1000). ISNA is considered by Western media to be one of the most independent and moderate media organizations in Iran, and is often quoted.[2][3] "While taking a reformist view of events, ISNA has managed to remain politically independent
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