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Stourbridge Canal
The Stourbridge
Stourbridge
Canal
Canal
is a canal in the West Midlands of England. It links the Staffordshire and Worcestershire Canal
Staffordshire and Worcestershire Canal
(at Stourton Junction, affording access to traffic from the River Severn) with the Dudley Canal, and hence, via the Birmingham
Birmingham
Canal
Canal
Navigations, to Birmingham
Birmingham
and the Black Country.Contents1 History1.1 Operation 1.2 Railway Age 1.3 Stourbridge
Stourbridge
Extension Canal2 Course2.1 Stourbridge
Stourbridge
Town Arm3 Restoration3.1 2008 Breach4 See also 5 Bibliography5.1 ReferencesHistory[edit] The Stourbridge
Stourbridge
and Dudley canals were originally proposed as a single canal in 1775, with a primary purpose of carrying coal from Dudley to Stourbridge
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HarperCollins
HarperCollins
HarperCollins
Publishers L.L.C. is one of the world's largest publishing companies and is one of the Big Five English-language publishing companies, alongside Hachette, Macmillan, Penguin Random House, and Simon & Schuster. The company is headquartered in New York City and is a subsidiary of News Corp. The name is a combination of several publishing firm names: Harper & Row, an American publishing company acquired in 1987 (whose own name was the result of an earlier merger of Harper & Brothers (founded 1817) and Row, Peterson & Company), together with UK publishing company William Collins, Sons (founded 1819), acquired in 1990. The worldwide CEO of HarperCollins
HarperCollins
is Brian Murray.[1] HarperCollins has publishing groups in the United States, Canada, the United Kingdom, Australia, New Zealand, India, and China
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Bill (proposed Law)
A bill is proposed legislation under consideration by a legislature.[1] A bill does not become law until it is passed by the legislature and, in most cases, approved by the executive. Once a bill has been enacted into law, it is called an act of the legislature, or a statute.Contents1 Usage 2 Preparation 3 Introduction 4 Legislative stages 5 Enactment and after5.1 Approval 5.2 Afterwards6 Numbering of bills 7 See also 8 References 9 External links9.1 Hong Kong 9.2 India 9.3 Ireland 9.4 New Zealand 9.5 United Kingdom 9.6 United StatesUsage[edit] The term bill is primarily used in Anglophone nations
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Robert Whitworth
Robert Whitworth (1734 – 30 March 1799) was an English land surveyor and engineer, who learnt his trade under John Smeaton
John Smeaton
and James Brindley, and went on to become one of the leading canal engineers of his generation.Contents1 Biography1.1 Early career 1.2 Canal engineering2 Bibliography2.1 ReferencesBiography[edit] Whitworth was born in Sowerby, West Riding of Yorkshire
West Riding of Yorkshire
to Henry and Mary Whitworth. He was baptised on 15 November 1734, and was their sixth child of seven. His father worked as a combsmith, and the family lived in a house called Waterside or Wheatleyroyd, where he probably lived until he married Sarah Irwin on 26 December 1765. After a brief period in Norton in the Moors around 1772, Whitworth and his family, which by now included two sons, returned to Sowerby, and stayed there until the 1790s
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John Ward, 2nd Viscount Dudley And Ward
John Ward, 2nd Viscount Dudley and Ward
John Ward, 2nd Viscount Dudley and Ward
(22 February 1725 – 10 October 1788) was a British peer and politician. [1] He was the son of John Ward, 1st Viscount Dudley and Ward, and his first wife Anna Maria (née Bourchier) and educated at Oriel College, Oxford. He was returned to Parliament as one of two representatives for Marlborough in 1754, a seat he held until 1761, and then represented Worcestershire until 1774. The latter year he succeeded his father in the viscountcy and entered the House of Lords. Ward married Mary, daughter of Gamaliel Fair, gardener and seeds-man, who died December 17, 1758, aged 69.[2][3] Ward died in October 1788, aged 63. As he had no sons he was succeeded in the viscountcy by his half-brother William. A daughter[edit] He had a natural daughter Anna Maria Ward (1778–1837), by his Viscountess (when she was still Mrs. Mary Baker, whom he later married)
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Act Of Parliament
Acts of Parliament, also called primary legislation, are statutes passed by a parliament (legislature).[1] Act of the Oireachtas
Act of the Oireachtas
is an equivalent term used in the Republic of Ireland
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Thomas Dadford
Thomas Dadford Sr. (died 1809) was an English canal engineer as were his sons, Thomas Dadford Jr., John Dadford, and James Dadford. Biography[edit] Thomas Dadford probably originated from Stewponey or Stourton, Staffordshire near Stourbridge
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Share Capital
A corporation's share capital[1] (or capital stock in US English) is the portion of a corporation's equity that has been obtained by the issue of shares in the corporation to a shareholder, usually for cash. In a strict accounting sense, share capital is the nominal value of issued shares (that is, the sum of their par values, as indicated on share certificates). If the allocation price of shares is greater than their par value, e.g. as in a rights issue, the shares are said to be sold at a premium (variously called share premium, additional paid-in capital or paid-in capital in excess of par). Commonly, the share capital is the total of the aforementioned nominal share capital and the premium share capital. Conversely, when shares are issued below par, they are said to be issued at a discount or part-paid. Sometimes shares are allocated in exchange for non-cash consideration, most commonly when company A acquires company B for shares
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Second World War
Allied victoryCollapse of Nazi Germany Fall of Japanese and Italian Empires Dissolution of the League of Nations Creation of the United Nations Emergence of the United States
United States
and the Soviet Union
Soviet Union
as superpowers Beginning of the Cold War
Cold War
(more...)ParticipantsAllied Powers Axis PowersCommanders and leadersMain Allied leaders Joseph Stalin Franklin D
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House Of Lords
The House of Lords
House of Lords
of the United Kingdom, also known as the House of Peers, is the upper house of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. Like the House of Commons, it meets in the Palace of Westminster.[2] Officially, the full name of the house is the Right Honourable the Lords Spiritual
Lords Spiritual
and Temporal of the United Kingdom
United Kingdom
of Great Britain and Northern Ireland
Northern Ireland
in Parliament assembled. Unlike the elected House of Commons, all members of the House of Lords (excluding 90 hereditary peers elected among themselves and two peers who are ex officio members) are appointed.[3] The membership of the House of Lords
House of Lords
is drawn from the peerage and is made up of Lords Spiritual and Lords Temporal
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Birmingham
Birmingham
Birmingham
(/ˈbɜːrmɪŋəm/ ( listen),[3] locally /ˈbɜːmɪŋ(ɡ)əm/ or /ˈbɜːmɪnəm/) is a city and metropolitan borough in the West Midlands of England, standing on the River Rea
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Ironstone
Ironstone
Ironstone
is a sedimentary rock, either deposited directly as a ferruginous sediment or created by chemical replacement, that contains a substantial proportion of an iron compound from which iron either can be or once was smelted commercially. This term is customarily restricted to hard coarsely banded, nonbanded, and noncherty sedimentary rocks of post- Precambrian
Precambrian
age. The Precambrian
Precambrian
deposits, which have a different origin, are generally known as banded iron formations. The iron minerals comprising ironstones can consist either of oxides, i.e. limonite, hematite, and magnetite; carbonates, i.e. siderite; silicates, i.e
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Limestone
Limestone
Limestone
is a sedimentary rock, composed mainly of skeletal fragments of marine organisms such as coral, forams and molluscs. Its major materials are the minerals calcite and aragonite, which are different crystal forms of calcium carbonate (CaCO3). About 10% of sedimentary rocks are limestones. The solubility of limestone in water and weak acid solutions leads to karst landscapes, in which water erodes the limestone over thousands to millions of years
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Dividend
A dividend is a payment made by a corporation to its shareholders, usually as a distribution of profits.[1] When a corporation earns a profit or surplus, the corporation is able to re-invest the profit in the business (called retained earnings) and pay a proportion of the profit as a dividend to shareholders. Distribution to shareholders may be in cash (usually a deposit into a bank account) or, if the corporation has a dividend reinvestment plan, the amount can be paid by the issue of further shares or share repurchase.[2][3] A dividend is allocated as a fixed amount per share, with shareholders receiving a dividend in proportion to their shareholding. For the joint-stock company, paying dividends is not an expense; rather, it is the division of after-tax profits among shareholders. Retained earnings (profits that have not been distributed as dividends) are shown in the shareholders' equity section on the company's balance sheet – the same as its issued share capital
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Great Western Railway
The Great Western Railway
Great Western Railway
(GWR) was a British railway company that linked London
London
with the south-west and west of England, the Midlands, and most of Wales. It was founded in 1833, received its enabling Act of Parliament on 31 August 1835 and ran its first trains in 1838. It was engineered by Isambard Kingdom Brunel, who chose a broad gauge of 7 ft (2,134 mm)—later slightly widened to 7 ft 1⁄4 in (2,140 mm)—but, from 1854, a series of amalgamations saw it also operate 4 ft 8 1⁄2 in (1,435 mm) standard-gauge trains; the last broad-gauge services were operated in 1892
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Selly Oak
Selly Oak
Oak
is an industrial and residential area in south west Birmingham, England. The area gives its name to Selly Oak ward
Selly Oak ward
and includes the neighbourhoods of: Bournbrook, Selly Park, and Ten Acres. The adjoining wards of Edgbaston
Edgbaston
and Harborne
Harborne
are to the north of the Bourn Brook, which was the former county boundary, and to the south are Weoley, and Bournville. A district committee serves the four wards of Selly Oak, Billesley, Bournville
Bournville
and Brandwood. The same wards form the Birmingham
Birmingham
Selly Oak
Oak
(UK Parliament constituency), represented[when?] by Steve McCabe (Labour). Selly Oak
Oak
is connected to Birmingham
Birmingham
by the Pershore Road (A441) and the Bristol Road (A38)
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